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Harbor Freight Haul Master trailers? (Post a pic of your wood trailer!)

Post in 'The Gear' started by Badfish740, Nov 7, 2011.

  1. Badfish740

    Badfish740 Minister of Fire

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    Anybody have one? I know some people hate HF stuff but the way I see it you take them with a grain of salt. Some of their stuff is good for what it is (cheap tools/equipment), and some of it is complete junk. Their log splitters for example are basically good units as long as you upgrade the components on some of the places they skimp (hydraulic lines, etc...), so I'm wondering if the same goes for the trailers? I was looking at this one:

    http://www.harborfreight.com/1720-l...-12-inch-five-lug-wheels-and-tires-94564.html

    Basically I need a trailer that will haul about half a cord of green wood. I figure the things to watch out for would be low quality bearings (they could be easily replaced for a few bucks), shoddy wiring (a once over with hot glue and heat shrink would fix that), and a poor paint job (I would just go over the whole thing in black POR-15), but other than that it looks like a good little base to start with. Tractor Supply has their trailer brand "Carry On" which is basically the same size with a slightly lower weight rating for the same ($400) price. I ought to look both of them over before I buy. Harbor Freight sends me coupons all the time too which might knock the price down even more. Over time I'll probably end up adding full stake sides, a tongue box for my saws, etc...so I might end up looking for junkyard springs for it one day, but I'll have to watch the total weight since I'll be towing with my 4 cylinder Toyota pickup. I wouldn't be towing any great distances or up any significant grades though. Let's see your wood hauling trailers, Harbor Freight or not-trucks seem to get all of the attention when it comes to wood hauling-what about the lowly trailer?

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  2. tamarack

    tamarack New Member

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    By the time you add sides, deck, toolbox, upgrades, you're going to have alot of $$ in that trailer.
    I haul with a 5 X 8 trailer with a 3500# axle that I bought new 10 years ago for @ $800.00.

    I'd keep looking for a welded frame trailer if I were you. That one looks a bit flimsy.
    But I always like to have some overkill with my gear.

    Attached Files:

  3. gpcollen1

    gpcollen1 Minister of Fire

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    You get what you pay for...and that looks like you still have a ton of work to do for a trailer that won't hold the weight of a half-cord.

    I got my Brimar with a landscape gate for around $1200. 5 yrs later or so it has become one of my best friends...

    http://www.bri-mar.com/trailerdetail.php?modelsid=115&categorysid=6


    With extended sides, she can haul almost a cord...but must drive slowly...
  4. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    I would not want it. Not enough of a load there. Look for used.
  5. stee6043

    stee6043 Minister of Fire

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    I debated what type if trailer I really needed a few years back. I decided to buy a trailer that should do everything I ever wanted and be done with it.

    I'd highly recommend Kaufman trailers. Quality is outstanding and they do deliver!

    http://www.kaufmantrailers.com/

    I've been extremely pleased with my "car hauler" that's been adapted to wood hauling 99% of the time. I can throw just shy of 2 cord on this beast. For me that means less trips to haul wood each year. Big time saver in my case.

    I believe it was last year that I didn't quite get my last load off before our first snow...

    [​IMG]
  6. firefighterjake

    firefighterjake Minister of Fire

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    Are the kids super heroes with a need to protect their secret identities? :) :)
  7. JustWood

    JustWood Minister of Fire

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  8. Skier76

    Skier76 Minister of Fire

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    Ive had a 4x8 similAr to that since 2004. I've used it to haul everything from mulch, to firewood to furniture. Youre not going to break the bank with the decking; 3/4" sheet of good ply painted with porch floor paint. I used some basic 2x4's to build the side stakes. I used 1/4" ply on the sides; again, painted. I think mine is rated for just under 1500 lbs. it has the semi boxed axle. Ive seen the one you posed in the local store. I believe it has a solid tubular axle. I put a better hitch on it recently, and gave it a rapaint with some decent red paint. ( the metal parts). I pack the bearings once a year and store it outside on a cement pad i made from old sidewalk pavers. Buy the time you get all the sides on, you'll still have under $500 into it.

    Im on the ipad now, ill pot some pics when i get on the pc.
  9. Blue2ndaries

    Blue2ndaries Minister of Fire

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    Picked this up on CL about 8yrs ago for $500. Looked around for a few mos, but they all seemed to go quick. 5'x8' w/4' sides, 3500lb axle, fold down ramp gate.

    Attached Files:

  10. bogydave

    bogydave Minister of Fire

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    After a few year of using a single axle trailer. I'd get a dual axle. Green wood is heavy & when you drive for a load, it's nice to get at least a cord per trip.
    A good single axle is rated 3500 lbs & a dual axle 6500, Just about the same gas mileage per trip, but lots more wood per trip.
    It's easy to overload my trailer. this load was 35 to 40 MPH all the way home, real heavy load. almost a cord, heavy & it wanted to fish tail.

    Attached Files:

  11. gmule

    gmule Feeling the Heat

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    I have had that same trailer for about 4 years now. I didn't buy it to haul wood with I bought it to haul my dirt bikes and camping gear with. It is light enough that with two bikes and my camping gear I can tow it with the minivan pretty easy. I would recomend something a little more robust for hauling wood.
  12. jhoff310

    jhoff310 Member

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    i have never purchased a trailer new from a store, I may buy a dump trailer in the near future. I have always bought mine from someone who built it in their shop/backyard or built mine. I have 4 trailers, the last one i picked up for $500. its a 22'er with 2 6,000 lb mobile home axles underneath. The frame is 3" channel iron. I have have loaded the guts out of it. My smaller trailers 2 4x8 and a 6x9 have 3500lb torsion axles underneath, they too have taken a beating.
    I guess what I am trying to say it look on craigslist or out in farm country. Someone might have one sitting back in the brush that may need some tires and some minor welding work. Probably get a better built trailer that way than going the HF route.

    Good luck to ya
    Jeff
  13. Shari

    Shari Minister of Fire

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    I looked for a long time to replace my little WWII 4x6 trailer.

    I wanted (in no particular order):

    4'x8' (easier to store at the home)

    A-frame tongue

    14" or 15" tires

    3000# axle

    I went to a company that builds trailers - too costly.

    Took me 6+ months to find my 'dream' trailer(used) which met all my requirements:

    [​IMG]

    I added the wire fencing sides, Buddy bearings, new tires/rims.

    Lovin' it every day!
  14. Beer Belly

    Beer Belly Minister of Fire

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    Gotta a guy a couple blocks away has for sale, what looks to be the a camper frame/trailer....looks a little flimsy because it is sitting on uneven ground and you can see that it has some flex.....but I'm thinking that if you add decking to it, it would stiffen it up....it has dual axles
  15. bogydave

    bogydave Minister of Fire

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    Many of the good hard woods are 6,000 lbs per cord "Green" or more & 4000 lbs dry.
    1/2 cord green you need a 3,000 lb "+" rated trailer.
    Some weight per cord:
    Beech Dry : 3100 - 4000lbs Green: 4890 - 6290lbs
    Locust, Black: Dry 3230 - 4150lbs Green: 6030 - 7750lbs
    Some green & dry weights/cord here:
    http://www.consumerenergycenter.org/home/heating_cooling/firewood.html
  16. Beer Belly

    Beer Belly Minister of Fire

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    Wow, great link....I never realized how heavy the wood was once loaded....I know that each piece had some wieght, just never thought about the load...my poor truck
  17. Shari

    Shari Minister of Fire

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    BD,

    Great link and here's another one that I often use: Sweep's Library

    Often times new wood burners just want to get the wood home as quick as possible in as few trailer loads as possible. What they tend to forget about, or don't realize, is the weight of the load they are hauling. You have to have a trailer axle rated for the loads you plan on hauling and a tow vehicle rated to haul those weights.

    As an example, I often haul shagbark hickory. Green wood hickory weighs 4,080#'s per cord. Adding the trailer weight I would be approaching the max trailering weight for my SUV which is 5,000#'s.

    I didn't want to get into trailer brakes and all that plus my SUV is older, doesn't have a trailering package (tranny cooler, larger radiator, etc.) so I opted for a 4x8x2 trailer which will haul 1/2 cord. Believe me when I have 1/2 cord of green hickory in the trailer I can 'feel' it when going down the road.

    My Reese hitch is rated for 6,000#'s, my trailer is rated for 3,000#'s, my 14" new trailer tires are rated for 3,100#'s - I'm good to go.

    Also, when I have a load in the trailer I try to pick roads with a 45mph speed limit and I NEVER haul a load of wood on the freeway. :)
  18. Beer Belly

    Beer Belly Minister of Fire

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    I just keep an eye on my Bump Stops (on my truck)....when they get close to sittin' on the axle (1 inch), I'm done
  19. DanCorcoran

    DanCorcoran Minister of Fire

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    As we've discussed before on this site, the problem is not the suspension, it's the brakes. You may not endanger yourself, but you certainly endanger others on the highway if you drive with a truck or trailer loaded to more than the rated capacity of the truck (which is primarily limited by its braking ability).
  20. lukem

    lukem Minister of Fire

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    I have one. It is the 4x8 folding model. It was given to me by my uncle who wanted a bigger one. I pull it with my mower and ATV.

    I beat the dog $#!t out of it hauling wood, dirt, rock and whatever. Keep in mind that this is all at ATV speed, but it still keeps going. The most i had on it was a half cord of green hedge. It was heavy to say the least but held up.

    If i were paying out of pocket i would shop around though.
  21. SolarAndWood

    SolarAndWood Minister of Fire

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    My lowly single axle trailer has served me well. 5000lb axle and LR E tires.

    Attached Files:

  22. KarlP

    KarlP Feeling the Heat

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    Have had a folding one for 12 years now. It came from Home Depot so it was Long Chih. HF rebrands them to their own name.

    It works great, but think 1/3 of a cord not half a cord. Since my tow vehicle was a Corolla when I got it that was perfect for me.
  23. Bocefus78

    Bocefus78 Minister of Fire

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    Thanks for the pic.....now I know how to carry the hand truck! I already have the weedeater racks!
  24. Shari

    Shari Minister of Fire

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    I don't have a photo view of where the "toe" of the hand truck fits but there is a bracket there also which holds the foot/toe area from flopping around in transit.
  25. Bocefus78

    Bocefus78 Minister of Fire

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    Here's mine.

    6.5 x 12
    3500 lb
    2 ft sides
    Spare tire.....a must.....add that to your list

    Takes a cord or so with the tires being the only limit. I would guess I've had 5000 lb plus on here.
    I got it on Craigslist for 750. Best money I spent that year, by far.

    I will also add that as metal prices increase, a quality built trailer will appreciate....doubtful a hf trailer will.

    Attached Files:

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