Hardack ?

Brian VT Posted By Brian VT, Mar 24, 2009 at 12:32 PM

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  1. Brian VT

    Brian VT
    Minister of Fire

    Jul 30, 2008
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    Loc:
    Southern VT
    I've been scrounging some wood from a roadside powerline cut (with permission).
    A bunch of it, 2 full loads in my Ford Explorer, is heavy stuff and my buddy says it's Hardack (sp?)
    and could melt my stove if I'm not careful. Anyone here know another name for this tree ? I Googled
    it and searched here but came up empty.
     
  2. drdoct

    drdoct
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    Jan 24, 2008
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    Unless it says super unleaded or Pure Potassium on the side then I wouldn't worry about melting your stove with any wood. Post a pic and you'll get the answer pretty quickly but maybe not with this title.
     
  3. LLigetfa

    LLigetfa
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    Nov 9, 2008
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    Tamarack maybe? Needles like an evergreen except they shed in Winter. Tamarack is a hot burning wood and purported to be hard on the grates of cookstoves but fine in any other stove.
     
  4. firefighterjake

    firefighterjake
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    Jul 22, 2008
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    I've never heard of that species . . . maybe you're thinking hackmatack . . . which is another local name here in Maine for tamarack as LLigetfa mentioned although some folks mistakenly call it juniper as well.
     
  5. Brian VT

    Brian VT
    Minister of Fire

    Jul 30, 2008
    807
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    Loc:
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    It's not an evergreen (well, I guess tamarack really isn't either).
    It's hard and very heavy. I'll try to post a pic. I just thought someone here might have heard of something being called hardack.
    I've talked to a few people that call it that but none know any other name for it. I thought maybe it was locust but my buddy said:
    "Nope. Hardack. Burns hotter'n hell. That's a locust over there. Burns hot too."
     
  6. Brian VT

    Brian VT
    Minister of Fire

    Jul 30, 2008
    807
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    Loc:
    Southern VT
  7. Brian VT

    Brian VT
    Minister of Fire

    Jul 30, 2008
    807
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    Loc:
    Southern VT
    Finally found something.

    "and I made 12 gallons on 63 taps, all of which are in mixed woods with hemlock, yellow and white birch, cherry and hophornbeam (?spelling aka hardack)."

    http://www.sfrc.ufl.edu/4h/Hophornbeam/hophornb.htm

    Also known as ironwood.
     
  8. JerseyWreckDiver

    JerseyWreckDiver
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    Nov 28, 2008
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    Well if it is Hophornbeam its dam good wood. What kind of diameter you have?

    Post a couple pics, I know the bark well and can confirm if thats what you've got.
     
  9. Brian VT

    Brian VT
    Minister of Fire

    Jul 30, 2008
    807
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    Loc:
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    Here's what I've grabbed so far.
    There's some more smaller/bent stuff that might not be worth trying to split but there's 2 large chunks. One I couldn't even move, never mind get in my car.
    It's the big brother to the one under the beer can. I'll have to bring my saw and buck it up.
    The bark isn't as stringy looking as the pic in the link I posted. Maybe because it's an older tree ? Maybe it's not hophornbeam ?
    .


    [​IMG]
    .
    .
    [​IMG]
     
  10. Rowski

    Rowski
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    Nov 29, 2008
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    North Central Vermont (Jay Peak)
    I just cut some standing dead "hardhak" a few weeks ago. I really have not had a chance to burn with it yet. Some split easy some split really hard. I've been told it burns hot and leaves little light ash.
     
  11. jpl1nh

    jpl1nh
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    Jan 25, 2007
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    That's definately hop hornbeam. Awesome firewood, about as dense as it gets, (like me! :eek:hh: ) Found this mention doing a search "The Hop-hornbeam running along the top of the railing system came from woodland in Waitsfield, Vermont that is being managed for maple sugar production. The "ironwood" or "hardack" as it is called in Vermont, was harvested as a favor to a farmer. Tje Genesee Beer is a dead giveaway, thats where the "hops" in the hornbeam comes from.
     
  12. Brian VT

    Brian VT
    Minister of Fire

    Jul 30, 2008
    807
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    Loc:
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    Cool. Now I'm anxious to see how it burns. Probably takes 2 years to dry, huh ?
    Maybe I'll put a few splits in the paint drying booth at work for a few months. :cheese:
     
  13. RAY_PA

    RAY_PA
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    May 13, 2008
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    will you have to cut those rounds to length?....if so...your in for a new experience, it has the nic-name 'ironwood' for a good reason!
     
  14. Brian VT

    Brian VT
    Minister of Fire

    Jul 30, 2008
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    Loc:
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    Yah. I guess I'll be doing quite a bit of filing.
     
  15. kalevi

    kalevi
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    Sep 20, 2007
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    Ottawa Ontario
    Tree that look like an evergreen that shed their needles in winter are called Larch.
     
  16. kalevi

    kalevi
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    Sep 20, 2007
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    From Wikepedia

    Larch is a wood valued in for its tough, waterproof and durable qualities; top quality knot-free timber is in great demand for building yachts and other small boats, for exterior cladding of buildings and interior panelling. The timber is resistant to rot when in contact with the ground, and is suitable for use as posts and in fencing. The hybrid Dunkeld Larch is widely grown as a timber crop in northern Europe, valued for its fast growth and disease resistance.
     
  17. Todd

    Todd
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    Nov 19, 2005
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    Also known as Tamarak around these parts
     
  18. LLigetfa

    LLigetfa
    Minister of Fire

    Nov 9, 2008
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    Yes, Tamarack is valued for fence posts because of the resistance to rot. I remember cutting down a big Tamarack to use as a clothesline pole decades ago. That sucker was heavy to carry out and a chore to up end to drop into the hole I dig for it.
     
  19. firefighterjake

    firefighterjake
    Minister of Fire

    Jul 22, 2008
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    . . . and hackatack or juniper around here (although the only "true" juniper is ground juniper which is more of a bush).
     
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