1. Welcome Hearth.com Guests and Visitors - Please enjoy our forums!
    Hearth.com GOLD Sponsors who help bring the site content to you:
    Hearthstone Soapstone and Cast-Iron stoves( Wood, Gas or Pellet Stoves and Inserts)
    Caluwe - Passion for Fire and Water ( Pellet and Wood Hydronic and Space Heating)

Has anyone heard of Liberty Bricks

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by timothyjok, Jun 26, 2008.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. BioPellet

    BioPellet New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2006
    Messages:
    121
    I read this thread with great interest. I want everyone to know that we have increased our production and now we are fully stocked. Our dealers also should be fully stocked, including BT Enterprises and others found here :

    http://www.biopellet.net/wheretobuy

    We use the finest quality kiln dried hardwood sawdust in making our BioBricks(R) and continue to produce the same quality product we always have.

    We have our best price now so please stock up.

    Thomas Engel, Founder, BioPellet LLC

    Helpful Sponsor Ads!





  2. zombie*mommie

    zombie*mommie New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2009
    Messages:
    3
    Loc:
    New Milford Ct
    Just wanted to follow up and say BT was great in the way they handled the situation. We are sticking with the Biobricks now. Stocked up already for next season. No more toxic Liberty Bricks for us. Thanks for the help everyone.
  3. mmmmna

    mmmmna New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2008
    Messages:
    3
    To buy real Bio Bricks in Central New Hampshire (whenever they become available, IF they are available), there is a consortium in Manchester NH area that has replaced smaller distribution channels. One always hopes such a development is a good thing, but my old supplier which I formerly used (Big Fish in Sanford ME) is no longer listed as a distributor according to Bio Bricks website. The consortium has relatively decent prices and delivers, but I am skeptical about the future since this exclusivity will make competition rather difficult.

    On a related note...
    I went to the Rochester (NH) Fair last fall (2008), a local woodstove distributor was exhibiting. I talked to the distributor representatives there, and we talked about alternative fuels such as Bio Bricks. He had a LOT of misconceptions about Bio Bricks, and yet he took orders for wood pellets at the Fair. I told him the Bio Brick product is 100% mixed wood product that has been chipped and compressed (without binders) into block form. Despite this information, he maintained this was not acceptable as a fuel. I told him the bricks used the same formula as wood pellets, he told me I was wrong, these bricks contain straw, agricultural by-products, etc.

    One VERY important thing that came from him: a woodstove manufacturer will VOID you warranty if you burn anything but a mixture of hard and soft natural wood logs such as are cut from a woodlot and properly dried (meaning not even machine processed). I said what about those color logs that are sold at the supermarket? He said one in a season shouldn't be a concern unless it damages their stove (yeah: he said their stove). He argued that if they can determine that their stove was damaged by any non-natural wood products, if their stove was damaged by OVERFIRING for any reason, if their stove was damaged by burning only pine, then they would void your warranty.

    Distributor, you have lost my interest in any of the brands that you sell - if your manufacturers will only allow me to burn 3/8" diameter x 24" long 2 year old indoor dried yellow birch, you are no longer dealing with woodstoves that consumers will want. On the other hand, mister distributor, these alternative brick fuels are selling very quickly and the reasons we consumers buy these bricks include the delivery and storage convenience and for the consistent and clean burn characteristics. So, mister distributor, get off your high horse, tell your stove manufacturers to play HERE in the field where the buyers are heading, because, mister distributor, if you don't stand up for the consumer, the consumer will ignore you and you woodstove manufacturers and we will stand for ourselves by not buying your weak designs.

    American business wants to be all about the income, so they design unique, niche market, one of a kind but inflexible items; the consumer doesn't ask for those unique, niche market, one of a kind but inflexible items. It is not just the money to us, it is 'cost for performance + cost per value', and the consumer decides what performance and value they want (business CANNOT force us to buy anything, so they will have to come back to what we want), the decision of what we want to buy is not made by the woodstove manufacturer.

    Woodstove distributor, send these weak, inflexible woodstove designs back to the manufacturer and make the manufacturer see that they failed to reach these consumers; on the other hand, if you stand on the manufacturers side in support of woodstoves that fail to work for the consumers needs, see if that helps you any repeat buys.
  4. mmmmna

    mmmmna New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2008
    Messages:
    3
    Getting ready for the heating season. My woodstove is 2 seasons old, I see it is already crapping out. The woodstove distributor is coming by tomorrow to install a new upper baffle, mine has split into several pieces.

    They sure don't make them like they used to, and I'm not so sure that Bio Bricks were the cause of the failure.

    When I went in to ask about getting that baffle plate replaced, the service man said he had to order them, they had run out. I immediately realized that meant they had to have been stocking them! I asked if these were a big issue, he said no, not that he knew of. I asked how many he replaced in a year, he said I have no idea (that sounds reasonable, right? The guy that services stoves has no idea if he replaces a lot of them. Right.). Since he did not have the baffle plate in stock, we agreed he would call me when he got the replacement plate (upper baffle) in the coming week. That week came and almost went by so I called him at the end of the week. "Oh, hi! They are on backorder, we'll be getting our allotment Monday". I'm thinking... allotment? That sounds like they are planning on going through a few of these.

    Anyone want to buy a slightly used Heathstone Bennington? It isn't TOO hard to light.... and it really IS rated for 1800 square feet of Ranch style house (cough cough). More like 1000 square feet, in my opinion.

    By the way, if Liberty Bricks have ever contained remnants of counter tops, plywoods and glues, I believe the EPA needs to hear of it, since (as I understand it) construction materials are not supposed to be burned in consumer heating appliances (air quality issues, combustion deposit issues).
  5. bbc557ci

    bbc557ci New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2007
    Messages:
    208
    Loc:
    Central NY State
    Maybe you should order a few face cords of fire wood and see if that works out better for you?
  6. Laserman88

    Laserman88 New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2009
    Messages:
    1
    Loc:
    Richmond, VA
    I used liberty bricks all last winter, and I'm not going back to wood--even though my neighbor just started a wood business! i love a number of things about the bricks over using wood:

    1. it's dense, stackable and clean: I can put 1/3 ton in my hall closet below the coats. This means I go to the woodpile to get more wood every 5 days and can pick my time based on weather and how busy i am. This means I'm not tracking in mud and leaves when it is raining. This means no more bugs and dirt in the house that fell off the wood. i bring them into the house with a handcart.

    2. it's consistently dry: a friend told me that i would freeze if i tried to heat with unseasoned wood and they were right. the only consistency from local wood vendors is their willingness "to be mistaken" about when their wood was split.

    3. no more stockpiling 2 years of wood (see number 2 above) to make sure it is seasoned.

    4. if my back goes out, it is nice to know that i can lift as little as 2# (one brick) at a time to fill the stove.

    does everybody know you can burn the plastic wrapper? it is a kind of plastic that is like candles burning. it even smells like candles.

    this year the bricks are better--they hold their shape until they are done burning, which makes for a more complete burn.

    enjoy the global cooling!

    johnny
  7. btuser

    btuser Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2009
    Messages:
    2,026
    Loc:
    The island of Rhum Boogie
    The thing that scares me about processed firewood is the eventual corporate ownership. Thigs are fine now because the industry is growning, but once the market stops growing, pellet and biobrick manufactures will begin to demonize their cordwood competition. I'm not kidding. What happens when we are all brought to the understanding that trunkslamming rednecks moving raw forest products from one location to another results in the death of our forests? Outlaw small firewood operations. Make it illegal, akin to bootlegging. Evil, like growing your own dope.

    Its bad enough everything we eat is processed.
  8. tickbitty

    tickbitty Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2008
    Messages:
    1,537
    Loc:
    VA
    One of the proprieters of this product (liberty bricks) has been visiting "the wood shed" forum within the last week or so and in addition to explaining and defending the product he seems to be trying to get more conversation going regarding these and what his customers want. I was wondering about these myself since I live close to where they are made and the craigslist price for picking up a ton is pretty great. And we don't have as much seasoned wood around as I think we might end up needing this year.

    What I would like to know from folks here, if any of the folks who posted on this are still around, is whether there is any difference in burning this kind of thing in cat stoves vs. non-cat. Nobody really seems to have addressed that, and the stove I am getting is catalytic.
  9. fossil

    fossil Accidental Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2007
    Messages:
    10,359
    Loc:
    Bend, OR
    Lots of information if you do searches for "Liberty Brick", "BioBrick", or whatever name they're sold under. Moving this old thread over to the Wood Shed, since it's really about fuel for stoves, and the Wood Shed forum didn't exist as a separate entity when this thread was started back in June of 2008. Rick
  10. Fuelmaker

    Fuelmaker New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2009
    Messages:
    27
    Loc:
    Virginia
    You don't have to worry about corporate ownership of processed firewood. It is not nearly lucrative enough to attract financiers.

    With regard to us trying to corner the market by restricting woodcutting, I would never waste my time making trouble for the woodcutters, I spend far too much of my time dealing with regulation as it is. I think we need to defend each other's freedom to manage our own property and fight to continue using public lands without intervention by absentee do-gooders. No current brick producer has a dryer so we can't use cordwood and we are not going to compete for it. There are pellet producers that have started using pulpwood, but to make a premium pellet, you have to debark the logs first so they cant even use whole tree chips. So there is very little risk of competition from pellet mills. Pellet mills are the woodcutter's allies regarding access to public timber, because they need the lowest cost stuff like beetle kill or fire salvage timber.

    I look forward to the time some suit shows up at your property and tries to tell you you can't cut down a tree without a permit. I think with the power tools and firearms around, that some of those regulators would end up as cordwood. The better fed might lend a new meaning to "fatwood"
  11. Hunderliggur

    Hunderliggur Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2009
    Messages:
    602
    Loc:
    Lothian, MD
    I look forward to the time some suit shows up at your property and tries to tell you you can't cut down a tree without a permit. I think with the power tools and firearms around, that some of those regulators would end up as cordwood. The better fed might lend a new meaning to "fatwood"

    I guess you haven't been to Anne Arundel County, Maryland. I have 44 acres of woods and cannot even get the county forester to return a phone call or an email. I finally got a State of Maryland Forestry Department "Forest Stewardship Plan" for my property. It includes processing up to 10 cords/year from my forest. If the suits come by (they don't actually wear suits, but do drive white cars) they can take a look at my State plan. I did get reported twice by a neighbor for cutting down trees along the road for a 1/4 mile to bring in the utilities (15 feet wide from the pavement edge by 1500 feet long). I did have a county permit for that operation so the county deep sixed the complaint (twice). I did get fined $250 for digging out the stumps with my own backhoe instead of paying the utility to do it since I did not have an approved engineered grading plan for stump removal. Of course, the approved plan would have cost me more than $250 so I guess I came out ahead on th deal ;-)
  12. nojo

    nojo New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2009
    Messages:
    224
    Loc:
    Western/cent Mass
    Just picked up 6 bundles of Liberty Bricks today. The first bundle I used the bricks looked a little shaggy (not like the "bad" bricks in a previous post, just a little shaggy less fine material) and when they burned they flaked away in layers... I wasnt impressed by the heat output or burn time. The second bundle was very fine material like MDF. I put a 7" round in the back of the stove (maple??) a small red oak split(a little wet) ontop of that. Then 4 liberty bricks two on bottom long way (e/w) then two stacked the same on top of those in front by the intake and put a smal 2-3" round ontop of that. After about 20 minutes I was up in the 500deg stove top range and that was two hours ago. Its in the 450 range now. Flue temps are only about 300-325. (magnetic gauge). I had the Pipe Damper shut as well. When I shut the pipe damper I notice the stove holding a lot more heat, otherwise it just goes right out the flue. Anyway these bricks are burning nice, especially with other wood in the stove. Its a little just over 1cbft Trailblazer Classic 1700 stove thats supplementing my 1800 sqft 1880's colonial thats only partly insulated right now. Our heat bill last month was like 280 before I installed the stove.. and it wasnt this cold (its about 4 deg f right now).
  13. whotheguy

    whotheguy New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2009
    Messages:
    81
    Loc:
    Idaho
    You said it was "scrap", how much cutting and splitting do you need to do? Are we talking Noah's Ark here?!!!!! :)
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page