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Have to cut a roof beam.

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by Magus, Nov 30, 2010.

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  1. Magus

    Magus New Member

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    Well...I have my Hearth installed, Went with Slate.

    I was taking another look at where the stove pipe will go through the roof...(vaulted ceiling) and it appears that there is no way around cutting one of the roof beams.

    Looking at where the stove pipe needs to go, it is short of an inch.
    If I cut the wood beam then I can go straight up and out.

    If I try and move the stove back then I dont have enough clearance from the combustible wall...must be 13 inches with my stove.

    If I try to put an off set on the pipe so that it goes between the rafters, my stove can stay where it is but then I dont have enough clearance for the stove pipe from a combustible wall...18 inches.

    I am trying to keep from having to have a gawd awful heat shield on my wall...it look like the only way is to cut the beam.
    :?(

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  2. Dakotas Dad

    Dakotas Dad Minister of Fire

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    You could use double wall stove pipe to reduce your clearance to combustibles.

    A beam needs to be cut, or a joist, rafter or stringer? very different critters.
  3. TROY COOK

    TROY COOK New Member

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    Can't you off set the run with two 45's or 90's ?

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  4. Mad Tom

    Mad Tom Member

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    Don't do any structural damage to your house. Not worth it. Double wall pipe make any difference with the pipe clearance?. Are you talking a beam , a stringer, or a floor joist. A stringer could be cut and boxed out. Make sure you beef it up and screw it all together with good screws.

    I was in a 1.5 million dollar second home last year that had over 3 to 5 inches of deflection in the floors. Seems that the wife didn't like the columns that the builder had put in . It wasn't in sync with her open floor plan scheme so she had them removed. House was 2 years old and what I consider unsafe.
  5. MarkinNC

    MarkinNC Minister of Fire

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    I had a zero clearance "box" placed between my rafters and used two 45's to locate the pipe correctly. I was able to get the stove within an inch or two of where I planned.
  6. Rockey

    Rockey Minister of Fire

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    I hope your not contemplating cutting a rafter to make room for your stove pipe. You need to consult a structural engineer about your intentions. One good snowfall in Michigan this winter and you'll be wishing you never knew about wood stoves.
  7. Stump_Branch

    Stump_Branch Minister of Fire

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    Dont risk integrity, but think of Skylights or any other 'hole' in your roof. most of the time care is taken to miss those areas, might have helped to triple check before hand. But, if you do it proper box in with same size, species, etc. of wood. (vaulted ceilings...2x4 prefab truss, very strong, unless pieces are removed) i would double up either opposing support member, and box in , again doubled, with metal shear connections. dont just toenail them together. you should be fine. although...two 45's coming out towards the room..heat. plus pretty neat looking... always room for creativity.
  8. xman23

    xman23 Minister of Fire

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    My chimney box going between the rafters is 12" X 12". The rafters being 16" on center, it's almost impossible to not hit one. I have a cathedral ceiling and didn't want any offset's in the exposed pipe. Also a straight run can make cleaning easier. So I cut out the rafter and put in a double header above and below the box. It's not very difficult. and structurally correct. If it's something you don't want to tackle, any decent carpenter / framer will will do it in a couple hours. So put the stove where it should be and put in a straight chimney.

    Tom
  9. Lighting Up

    Lighting Up Feeling the Heat

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    I second this...third, forth and fifth it...
    md
  10. wkpoor

    wkpoor Minister of Fire

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    A properly installed and constructed box would not only preserve structural integrity but would also keep your chimney well away from combustibles.
  11. Renovation

    Renovation New Member

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    Go with double-wall stove pipe and offsets. Then your minimum clearance to combustibles is 6" And double wall stove pipe will last longer, improve draft, and keep your chimney cleaner and safer. Done.
  12. tfdchief

    tfdchief Minister of Fire

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    If it is truly a beam, you can't cut it without some engineered restructuring and re-supporting. If it is stick built with dimensional lumber, a good carpenter can probably re-support the cut rafter. If it is part of a truss, don't cut it without an engineer's analysis and recommendation on how to re-support it. The safe thing to do would be either get an engineers recommendation or not cut it and go around as others have said.
  13. Magus

    Magus New Member

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    You know how you visulally know what you are talking about yet it comes out wrong...well...I did that.

    It is not a beam that I am thinking about cutting...it is a JOIST that connects two beams.

    I was told that double walled pipe does not let off as much heat as single walled pipe? Is this not where some of my heat from the stove will come from?

    I have added a crude drawing of the stove from the side to show the side view...wall and joist. Also keep in mind that the roof slopes up ward from the view you are looking at.

    Option A will have a off set going in front of the stove, Option B will have the pip going to the rear of the stove thus reducing the clearance to less than 18"


    Now...Option C I would put the off set toward the bottom toward the stove...but then I would need a longer length of double walled.

    Also can you go from single wall to double walled?

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  14. raybonz

    raybonz Minister of Fire

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    Is it possible to have the stove exhaust exit from the back so you could connect a tee with a bottom cap to the stove then go straight up from there? That would move the pipe back and also give access for cleaning..

    Ray
  15. Magus

    Magus New Member

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    No...it only exits from the top :?(

    I will have this stove for about a year or so until I can get one with a bigger box and one that will have a 6" pipe connection.
  16. Magus

    Magus New Member

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    I have put in a pic of where the stove will go and also my first tile job :?)

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  17. Dakotas Dad

    Dakotas Dad Minister of Fire

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    Cutting and framing a ceiling joist is no problem at all. If your house is built with trusses, you may have a rafter also in line with your pipe, and that's a different deal, doable, but different. But you can do an off set in the attic if needed with your chimney pipe if you have room.

    Double wall stove pipe does not give off as much heat as single wall, that is true, but the amount of heat actually derived from the stove pipe in a modern EPA stove is a very small percentage, compared to the heat from the stove. I doubt you could tell the difference in the overall heating of your home either way.

    I would go "option C", double wall the whole way.
  18. Dakotas Dad

    Dakotas Dad Minister of Fire

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    Just out of curiosity.. You have some sort of heat shield plan? The cable connection and electrical outlets will not do well there behind the stove, (I don't think)...
  19. Magus

    Magus New Member

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    L@@KING and hearing dollar signs " cha-ching" in re to double wall pipe.
  20. Magus

    Magus New Member

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    No I dont. I am far enough from the wall 13" that I dont have to have a heat sheld on the wall.
    The stove has a built in head sheld on the back and that is where the blower will need to be plugged in.

    I have gotten rid of the cable in that box already...its just a box that I will need to cover up with a stainless steel plate.
  21. joel95ex

    joel95ex Member

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    Not sure which brand of chimney you're using, but some brands have a 15 degree pipe so you could clear that rafter. I would NOT cut a rafter after I saw what the tree did to my roof when it fell on it. the 15 degree bend could be place well below the beam then another with some rotation of the offset section to position it correctly.



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    I

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    Like that ??
  22. Magus

    Magus New Member

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    Im not stuck on any particular brand, what brand do you use?
  23. KWillets

    KWillets Member

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  24. joel95ex

    joel95ex Member

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  25. Magus

    Magus New Member

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    Well I took some measurements last night and this is what I found.

    The "center of the stove pipe that I have now is 4 inches off center of dead center of the wood beams.

    It sounds like two 15 degree elbows and a 12 inch should do it.
    I attatched a picture of were the pipe ends up and where it should be...
    That doble wall pipe is gawd awful expensive.

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