Hearth Repair

rook_ki Posted By rook_ki, Jul 31, 2013 at 10:02 AM

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  1. rook_ki

    rook_ki
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    Mar 2, 2013
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    In preparation for my BK Princess inserts, I have to repair my hearth. 3 of the 4 bluestone were so lose that I can lift them right up. After removing the blue stones, I see that they were being supported/secured on a few yellow bricks with mortars. Can I use regular red bricks and mortars from HD/Lowes or must I use refractory bricks and mortars? I posed the question to 2 of my local mason retailers. 1 said yes and 1 said no. I asked my friend who's a GC and he said no. I asked my stove installation contractor and he said yes. I asked my local fire inspector and he doesn't know. Would appreciate any much feedbacks. Thank you.
     
  2. begreen

    begreen
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    I would say no. the fireplace interior is part of the structure of the house. Unless the fireplace has been altered so it can never be used as a fireplace again, it should be repaired correctly. If it can never be used as a fireplace again, there should be a metal place affixed to the back fireplace wall stating this. It should be no big deal for the mason to get these bricks, they are common.
     
  3. webby3650

    webby3650
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    There is no reason to use firebrick or refractory cement unless its going to be exposed to open flames and intense heat. Since you are putting in an insert, this won't be the case. Either way, it will under the blue stone right?
     
  4. begreen

    begreen
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    Can it be guaranteed that it won't be used for direct fire in the future? Inspectors need to think about the next home buyer as well as the current one.
     
  5. webby3650

    webby3650
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    That's true. But from what I understand, it sounds like the brick in question is under the hearth. ? If so they would never be exposed to the flames of an open fire.

    I'm yet to meet a home inspector that's even knows the difference between firebrick and standard brick. In this area they aren't very with it. It's important for homeowners to educate themselves!
     
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