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Hearthstone Mansfield for my application?

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by brian_in_idaho, Aug 23, 2006.

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  1. brian_in_idaho

    brian_in_idaho New Member

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    I am currently building a new house that will be heated with a wood stove. Portions of the design are focused on the stove, in terms of layout and an indoor/outdoor closet for bringing wood into the house. I had done a bunch of research a couple of years ago and pretty much decided on a Mansfield, can you let me know if you feel if it is an appropriate choice? Here's my application:

    House is new construction, 2x6 walls, R21 walls, R49(??) (upgraded insulation) ceilings. The main floor (where the stove will be located) is 2100 square feet, there is a daylight basement of the same size we would like to get some heat from the stove to (more on this later). The house layout is a center open area/great room approximately 1000 sf (roughly square), with the living room/entry/kitchen and dining area, this area has vaulted ceilings, approximately 14' at the peak. The stove will be towards the center of this, with a 1/2 wall of cultured stone and a raised hearth dividing the room. There are wings at each end of the house, with a bedroom/bath in each.

    Now as to the basement. The stairway is open (no door). I am considering cutting register vents in the floor/ceiling to help with passive circulation, or would consider forced if necessary. Any thoughts on how best to accomplish this?

    Our backup heat is electric wall heaters (Cadet) upstairs, we have a Monitor that is going in the basement.

    The wood stove will be our primary heat source, thats why we did the elec/Monitor backup. I don't mind spending a bit more for the wood stove, but didn't want to dump a lot of money into an expensive forced air/propane system that will not be used much for my backup.

    Our winters hear in North Idaho typically are in the 10-20F range, with an occasional cold snap down to -20. There is virtually no hardwood available, I'll be burning mostly red (Douglas) fir and larch, from my property. Both of these are pretty good by western standards, but don't begin to compare with the hickory, oak and maple we burned back in western NY when I was a kid. My last experience with wood heat (also with the softwoods) was with a Quadrafire 5100 insert, I liked stove, but the heat output was at best OK for a 1800 SF house, and burn time was around 6 hours. I'm hoping to do better with the free-standing stove. The quality of the wood comes into play in the stove selection. I typically leave the house around 6 am, the wife does so as well, she gets home around 5, so we would like to maintain heat for 11-12 hours if possible. The Quad didn't do this.

    OK, any thoughts? Is the Mansfield a good choice for my application? Or would you recommend something else? I'm looking to order in the next week, due the price increase from Hearthstone. Oh, a local dealer has quoted me $2,204 on the stove, is this a fair price?

    Thanks in advance for any input.

    Bri

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  2. MountainStoveGuy

    MountainStoveGuy New Member

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    Im at work, so i cant make this to long, but a few points. You will not get that kind of burn time with pine in a mansfeild either. 8 hours max, but of course the stove will be heating for sometime after that.
    The price you got quoted was very good, almost too good. Double check it.
    That stove should be able to heat 2500 squares easy, and with your insulation it should not be a problem
    Im shure more will speak up to the other question, good luck.
  3. wg_bent

    wg_bent Minister of Fire

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    Sounds fine. My only sort of negative comment is that you will NOT get heat downstairs. It just isn't going to happen. If I were you, I'd install a second stove in the basement and look to get a small amount of heat up to the second floor early in the season, then run both in the colder season. Is the house built yet? If someone on this forum is building a home my stock suggestion is to look into masonry heaters. I'm not sure what they REALLY cost, but with the right design you could heat both floors with a single heater or have a single design that incorporated two chimneys into a single foundation. Other than that I'd say go with your plan. Also if designed into a home they can be an amazing center peice, but very little wood, are the cleanest burning wood appliances (although I find it hard to beat the big VC stove) and are said to provide a warmth comparable to standing in the sun. Even, gently and hard to resist.
  4. suematteva

    suematteva New Member

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    Sounds like you will have enough stove...getting the heat downstairs will be tough...especially with the higher ceilings..That stone hearth and such will hold good heat..The soapstone will give you a heat cushion.

    We have burned our mansfield for 3 seasons. Prior stove was a big Cast iron monster..After having both cast and soapstone, I am biased towards the soapstone because of the even heat and the ability to hold it longer..

    Don't have any experience burning pine or softwoods in it..When it is single digits or colder we can load at 10 pm and at 6 am there are plenty of coals to get it going with one small split and 2 normal piece. Primary air will be closed half to 2/3..Our wood is big.
  5. brian_in_idaho

    brian_in_idaho New Member

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    Thanks for your inputs guys.

    Mountainstoveguy, that price is the lowest of the 3 stores in my area that carry the Mansfield, they are normally $2400+, they have a 10% discount right now, in conjunction with our county fair. I'm going to go ahead and order it tomorrow, both to get the discount, and before the price jump on September 1.

    I figured I was out of luck on passive heating the basement. The only way I could see making it work would to put an air return from the high part of the vaulted ceiling down to the basement. I'll just pass on this for the moment. We have ICF concrete walls and upgraded insulation on the stick built walls of the basement, I don't figure it will be too bad to heat.

    Another Mansfield question, it looks like the outside air intake kit can pull air in at the rear centerline of the stove, can you tell me if this is correct? I need to run my rough-in ductwork and do my stonework before I get the stove, I don't want to create problems with how I do this.

    Thanks for your input guys.

    Bri
  6. MountainStoveGuy

    MountainStoveGuy New Member

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    You might or might not be wasting time and energy on outside air, enjoy this thread im sending you.... its only 8 pages long, and i was supposed to be writing a wiki, just havent gotten around to doing it. I have been to busy studying the Code of Hammurabi.

    http://www.hearth.com/econtent/index.php/forums/viewthread/2496/
  7. brian_in_idaho

    brian_in_idaho New Member

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    Warren, I looked at thermal mass stoves, Tulikivi in considerable detail. I also considered some of the outside wood burning boilers (Central Boiler) with in-floor radiant. After considerable pondering I decided they were out of my price range/skill level. The masonary heater meant a big change in terms of adding additional footings and structure to support the heater, plus the cost of the heater. I'd have liked to go that way....just beyond my reach. With this stove, I installed the chimney system (tripple wall) and am building the hearth, with cultured stone for the facing. This much I can do myself.

    Bri
  8. MountainStoveGuy

    MountainStoveGuy New Member

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    What brand of chimney did you install?
  9. brian_in_idaho

    brian_in_idaho New Member

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    MSG, thanks for the link on the outside air kits. Thinking back, at my last place I had an intake kit on my Quad, when I had a strong wind from the side of the house opposite the intake, I had all kinds of problems with it reverse drafting. Problem was that the air flow around the house created an area of reduced pressure on the downwind side of the house, but not at the chimney, since the air was not restricted there. I ended up blocking the intake with fiberglass, no more problems after that. Quite honestly, it had been so long that I had forgotten about this. I think I'll pass on it now. The design of my place is such that I can always add it if required. With the insulation upgrade and a vapor barrier I'm a bit concerned about the house being "too tight", but I'm sure I'll have enough accumulated leaks. I saw on the thread you linked that you also build your own house, as I am doing on this place. Whats wrong with us :).

    Bri
  10. MountainStoveGuy

    MountainStoveGuy New Member

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    Nuts i tell ya, my locatation added to the excitment. If you have provisions for adding it OAK later, then you cant go wrong with trying it out first without. My house is tight, and so far i havent needed it. That was a good thread, both sides of the issue well stated.
  11. brian_in_idaho

    brian_in_idaho New Member

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    I'm going to have to check. I put it in about 2 years ago, when I was still framing and roofing the place. It's what my local Hearthstone dealer recommended. I may have been wrong on triplewall-metalbestose is possible, IIRC thats double wall with insulation?? Getting old I guess, I could have told you a while ago.

    Bri
  12. MountainStoveGuy

    MountainStoveGuy New Member

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    Whew, OK. tripple wall is not typcially used on stoves, You have class A double wall, not tripple wall. Big difference.. I was just checkin.....
  13. brian_in_idaho

    brian_in_idaho New Member

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    MSG, it's definately a class a chimney system. When I said triplewall I was thinking back to my old place. At that time I believe triple wall stainless construction was approved as a class a as an alternative to metalbestoes. It's been 10 years on that, I'm fuzzy on details.

    Here's another question for Hearthstone owners. My only concern looking at the design of these things is the door and hinge system. Compared to my old Quad, and the Lopi's I looked at, the door is considerably thinner, and the hinges are a lot less beefy. Has there been any problem with the doors deflecting under the load of the gasket and not sealing properly, or of bowing and taking a set that way? IIRC they do their seals a bit differently, more of a sliding shutoff, rather than a straight compression seal so this may not be an issue. I had looked at the details pretty carefully, but that was some time ago. Or are there any other recurring problems with the Hearthstones I should know about?

    Thanks again.

    Bri
  14. MountainStoveGuy

    MountainStoveGuy New Member

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    Some time ago they re designed there door latches, i think that was last fall. The latches are much better then they were. That said, i have the old style latch, and i havent had any issues with stripping out the shaft. The door frame is beefy as it needs to be, never have had a problem with it ever getting out of wack. When a stove has a soapstone front, the door frame will not be as beefy as a cast stove or steel, because the frame is cast to the stove, not built in like stone. I have had miss cast door frames out there, just a manufacturing defect. Of course those were replaced ASAP, and that was during a time of quality control managemnt issues they were having last spring. I had 2 out of 80 stoves sold have a bad cast. Check the door when you get it, if it has a fat handle, its the new style, and it the door and frame match up when you get it, it will match up for the service life of the appliance.
  15. brian_in_idaho

    brian_in_idaho New Member

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    Well nuts. I ordered the stove yesterday, in the matte black. I just got a call form the dealer, according to Hearthstone, they wouldn't have it built and shipped till November! I didn't realize the back log was this long. The dealer has one in the blue/black porcelain, for $270 more, in stock. I'm going to run over and look at it at lunch. Any advantage to the porcelain finish? I like the matte black look fine, I'm thinking that the procelain might be a bit easier to keep clean.

    MSG, how fat is the fat handle? This stove has been on the floor for a while, I would like to make sure its one of the newer designs. Is the on here the old style? http://www.hearthstonestoves.com/wood_stoves/mansfield/

    Thanks again for all the input.

    Bri
  16. MountainStoveGuy

    MountainStoveGuy New Member

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    The new handle has 1 set screw, the old has 2 set screws. With the increase, if he will not honor the price now for the special order stove, obviously the blue black will be cheaper now then the matte later. Enamel is fine, no maintence needed like matte black.
  17. brian_in_idaho

    brian_in_idaho New Member

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    Turns out it is one of the older, 2 screw designs-nuts! I went ahead with it anyway, I like the blue/black satin finish. It seems to bring out the colors of the soapstone a bit more than the black. Though, for the price difference I would have been happier with black-sucks to be a poor working stiff!

    Anyway, I have been working on the hearth all weekend, I have the structure finished, CBB installed, I cut in a couple of vents to better cool the wall. I'll be facing it with cultured stone, I hope to get the lathe on tonight, and start the stone work tomorrow. I'd really rather be out cutting wood!

    Is there interest in pics of the construction/stone work? I have been trying to take some as I go along.

    MSG, thanks for all the input in this thread.

    Bri
  18. MountainStoveGuy

    MountainStoveGuy New Member

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    You bet, and dont worry, if your handle has a problem they will send out the new one. My old style is as good as new.
  19. suematteva

    suematteva New Member

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    Msg & Brian in Idaho,

    Ours from 02 blue/black had the one set screw on original, with that little ball that lasted about 2 mths. Since Jan of 03 have the one they sent and it has been fine, have not touched since..blue black is great, we wipe it off a couple times with damp cloth and that is it..
  20. MountainStoveGuy

    MountainStoveGuy New Member

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    you have the second version, wich has worked well for me too. People were still cranking on them to hard, so they went to a spline type of shaft, instead of a D style shaft. If any of them fail, they have always been good about getting it taken care of.
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