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Hello everyone , I am new here

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by Joey Jones, Sep 13, 2008.

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  1. Joey Jones

    Joey Jones New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2008
    Messages:
    237
    Loc:
    New hampshire
    Switched to wood because of the price of oil and found the new stoves need very dry wood to operate constantly and efficiently.... I have a new Englander 13 model stove. Have lit it twice with super cedar staters and noticed that the door must be left slightly ajar to accumulate coals and allow this stove to burn. A little freaked out by this thing as I don't have lots of kindling to provide many quick starts during the shoulder months. I did try to buy regular seasoned wood from a dealer I didn't know at $250/cord, but now that I have tried the wood out ....it goes out without constant attention. Is this what i bought into....a constant struggle with wood to keep a flame alive?
    Been Downhearted, JJ

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  2. bluefrier

    bluefrier Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2008
    Messages:
    320
    Loc:
    Maryland
    Most, if not all new woodburner have trouble getting properly seasoned wood in the first year. Just try to mix this wood in with
    some super dry wood like pallets or some compressed logs. Also, you can split the wood smaller to aid the drying process.
    Good luck with that 13 as you already know it likes dry wood.
  3. aandabooks

    aandabooks New Member

    Joined:
    May 29, 2008
    Messages:
    141
    Loc:
    Central Illinois
    Start a small fire in it with the door open. Leave it open until the good coaling starts. Then add wood and don't clean out all of the coals. If you tend to the fire and are around to do so, you shouldn't have a problem. There is definately a learning curve with woodburning. Also, get some of the wood under cover and bring a couple of totes in and put near the stove. Amazing how a woodburner will dry out wood.

    You do have another 3-4 cords on order or know where to get it, right? 1 cord in a woodburner solo heating a house is not as much wood as you might think.
  4. btj1031

    btj1031 New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2008
    Messages:
    320
    Loc:
    NH
    It can be a struggle without dry wood. I learned this last year, as a first year stove burner. I bought my wood long before deciding to get the stove, since I had a fireplace, but it wasn't stacked in a place that was good for seasoning. At the end of the season, when I got to the two year old wood hidden behind the newer wood, I really noticed how well the stove could burn with well-seasoned wood. So, maybe your expectations will not be met this year, but if you buy some good green wood now for next year and repeat that process year after year, you should be OK.
  5. My_3_Girls

    My_3_Girls Member

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2006
    Messages:
    147
    Loc:
    Massachusetts
    Yup, what he said
  6. savageactor7

    savageactor7 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2008
    Messages:
    3,700
    Loc:
    CNY
    Joey get some junk pallets to cut up and add to your wood. You can find them around around truck terminals and shopping centers. Keep a couple of crow bars/wonder bars with you and pretty soon you can dismantle them on site in less than a minute. No problem burning nails/staples...just don't cut into 'em with your saw. And try and burn on the hot side stove top temp 450-500 if you can to keep the creasolt at bay.
  7. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2008
    Messages:
    15,971
    Loc:
    Anderson, Indiana
    The fun really starts with 8-10 in of snow down!
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