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Help a newbie figure out how to install his wood stove

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by Jason867, Nov 6, 2012.

  1. Jason867

    Jason867 New Member

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    Like the title says, I'm new and I need some expert help.

    I just got this Lopi stove from my dad for free (it was used briefly by my deceased grandfather as well)

    [​IMG]

    I'm wanting to install it for a backup heat source. My house is totally electric, so if the power goes out, I have no heat. I figure this stove would work great in an emergency for both heat and a cooking surface.

    Other than emergencys, I don't plan on using it any, except maybe during thanksgiving or Christmas meals (more for ambiance, than for heat...)

    My chimney is right behind this drywall, you can see where the previous owners had something hooked up to it, and later covered up the hole.

    [​IMG]

    Here is the chimney in the attic, directly above the stove. Notice that it does not protrude through the roof, it ends just underneath it.

    [​IMG]

    Here is the top of the chimney, the hole is 8.5" in diameter.

    [​IMG]

    A view of the side:

    [​IMG]

    And a view of the inside:

    [​IMG]
    I know what you're thinking, no that's not an animal down there, it's just some shiny rocks that in the camera flash looked like an animal with glowing eyes. It freaked me out too!

    To me, the chimney looks like it's in great shape, what do you guys think?

    So anyways, I know I need to line the chimney with a 6" liner (to match the 6" opening on the stove).
    I know about all the clearance issues, and how to properly reduce clearances using shields and such.

    What I don't know is how to properly transition from the black pipe coming off the stove to the side of the chimney, going through the drywall.

    Another thing I'm stumped on is how to come off the top of the chimney and go through the roof, I know I can't just have the liner pop through the roof, it needs a special box or something.

    So what parts do I specifically need to make those two transitions?

    I was planning on ordering my liner and stuff from woodlanddirect.com, but it seems I can't find the proper parts to push through the roof, as well as the side of the drywall.

    Also, about the hearth pad. Would a sheet of cement board, covered with some 1/4" tile, set directly on the wood (cutting away the carpet) work for a hearth pad, and keep the wood slat floor from smoldering?

    Also, I don't have a lot of room for a huge hearth pad, it wouldn't look right and could be a trip hazard. Since I'm not going to use the stove very often, if any, I wondered if I could make the hearth pad rather narrow in the front. I understand I'd be risking embers and ashes setting my carpet on fire. But I figured I could simply lay down a fire-retardant rug in front of the stove whenever I am using it, and then stow the rug away for the 99% of the time the stove will not be used.

    Keep in mind I'm not made of money, I'm doing all the work myself with the help of my dad. We have a lot of common sense and experience about home repairs and such, but this is a bit beyond our expertise.

    Any help would be appreciated.

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  2. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Welcome. Which model Lopi is this, the Endeavor? If so, your hearth can be as you proposed. It just needs ember protection. As for the chimney, can it just be continued up using cement block through the roof? Is there a patch in the roof where it used to go through?

    Here's an article about connecting the stove through the wall:

    http://www.hearth.com/econtent/index.php/articles/passing_a_chimney
  3. Jason867

    Jason867 New Member

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    I'm not sure what model it is, it looks a lot like the Liberty that Lopi advertises on their website.

    Here's a couple pictures of the label on the back of the stove, I can't tell exactly what model it is.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I guess I could do the cement block through the roof, but me and my dad aren't brick layers and don't know anything about doing that sort of thing. I just figured there was a safe way to put the pipe through the roof.
  4. ridemgis

    ridemgis Burning Hunk

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    I'll be curious to see how you deal with that chimney. My situation was identical. Being a wide eyed innocent to such things, I also assumed that a chimney liner could be run up and extended through the roof into a new class A. A half dozen installers and masons said there was no way to make the transition from a liner to Class A. All said that to use the existing chimney they would have to rebuild it back up above the roof line and then install a liner.

    PJ
  5. Jason867

    Jason867 New Member

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    So that's what you did? You had someone build your masonry chimney back up through the roof?

    I know I can't put the liner through the roof, but I figured a double wall pipe or something would connect to the liner and then go through the roof.
  6. ridemgis

    ridemgis Burning Hunk

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    We ended with a bigger stove that would not fit by the original chimney, so we went straight up with a new class A.
    All the installers we spoke with said there was no way to make the transition from liner to class A under the roof.
  7. Jason867

    Jason867 New Member

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    so what is a class A? I keep seeing people refer to it, but I don't recall reading about it.
  8. schlot

    schlot Minister of Fire

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    Good luck with the installation and with using it "just" on those days. I think once you use it you will enjoy it too much to keep from using it more often than that.
  9. PapaDave

    PapaDave Minister of Fire

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    Jason, welcome to the Hearth.
    That looks like a prime candidate for a through the roof kit.
    The money you'd spend on a liner and anything else needed (mason, liner, etc.) would possibly be more than that.
    Through the ceiling/roof is pretty easy as long as all CTC's are followed.
    What part of the country are you in?
  10. Jason867

    Jason867 New Member

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    I'm in east central indiana.

    What's the through the roof kit you speak of?
  11. PapaDave

    PapaDave Minister of Fire

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  12. Jason867

    Jason867 New Member

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    So that would get me from the chimney through the roof? I'm not sure I'm following...
  13. granpajohn

    granpajohn Minister of Fire

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    Agree. You read my mind, Schlot.
  14. DAKSY

    DAKSY Patriot Guard Rider Staff Member

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    You need to open that hole in the wall & see what's in there for the thimble. That's gonna be your first issue.
    Once that's shown to be ok (or not), you can then run your liner from a tee at the thimble to the top of the existing structure & attach it to an anchor plate. Then you will hafta continue thru the roof with Class A. You will need a flashing on the roof with a storm collar, & a cap on top. Looks like your roof penetration is gonna be close to the ridge beam, so your visible Class A is probably gonna be right at three feet (or a little more). You don't have a choice on the hearth pad. The MINIMUM dimensions will be specified by the plate on the stove & or the installation manual...Like schlot said, once you feel the heat, there's no turning back...
  15. ridemgis

    ridemgis Burning Hunk

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    So there is a way to make use of that existing chimney without having to install new masonry above the roof line? I was pretty sure there must be in spite of all the naysaying from local installers.
  16. Jason867

    Jason867 New Member

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    Come to think of it, the label on the back of the stove says this about the floor protection:

    "Floor protection must be a non-combustible material, extending beneath the heater and to the front, sides, and back as indicated. See owners-manual for examples of non-combustible materials that can be used."

    I don't have the manual for this stove, but I found a manual for the Lopi Liberty on their website, which looks exactly like this stove.
    The link to the manual is here:http://www.lopistoves.com/TravisDocs/100-01164.pdf

    In that manual, it states: "Floor protection must be non-combustible and at least .018" thick (26 gauge)." That's all it says about floor protection. It doesn't say anything about a hearth pad or whatever.

    Does that mean I just need something under the stove that won't catch fire from ashes and embers? It makes me think that it doesn't get hot at all under the stove, and that the only worry is about embers catching stuff on fire. In that case, I'd be tempted to leave the carpet under there, use no hearthpad, and only use a fiberglass rug when the stove is running.
  17. jeff_t

    jeff_t Minister of Fire

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    Is it possible to transition from the liner to class A? I have never seen anything to do that, but I have never looked for it. How would the pipe be supported?

    Seems like by the time the liner is installed, and the flashing and the flashing and storm collar, and whatever it takes to transition, and the extra pipe, it would be close to the same money as a new SS chimney. All it would take is a ceiling support, insulation shield, and a few more pieces of pipe. Then it is done right, and can be located in another place if there is a better location for it.

    How tall is the chimney? Single story, two, three?
  18. jeff_t

    jeff_t Minister of Fire

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    You need non-combustible flooring under the stove. Durock and tile would be fine. Hearth rugs aren't adequate. Fire-resistant does not equal non-combustible.
  19. DAKSY

    DAKSY Patriot Guard Rider Staff Member

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    I can't speak for your local guys, but these type of products have been around for years. They are safe when installed correctly & are approved by NFPA. I personally, have installed 4 or 5 of them in situations JUST like the OP has. The NICE thing is that you have a hole in your roof for at MOST a couple of hours. No waiting for mortar to dry. No framing - dependent upon the existing conditions of the roof & rafters.
  20. DAKSY

    DAKSY Patriot Guard Rider Staff Member

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    That's what the adapter plate does. It is brand specific on the top side but it will receive the SS liner from below. The plate then gets anchored (tapconned) to the existing masonry of the chimney. The additional Class A is supported by the adapter, & is secured by the flashing, unless it goes high enough to require a roof support kit.
  21. jeff_t

    jeff_t Minister of Fire

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    Good to know. We've been looking at vacation properties, and saw one yesterday that had the same situation.
  22. PapaDave

    PapaDave Minister of Fire

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    That's great info Daksy.
    How does cost compare doing it through the wall or with that adapter plate setup? Any idea?
    OP mentioned cost issues (I can relate).
  23. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Check the burntubes inside of the stove. The early models used steel which burned out after time.
  24. Snotrocket

    Snotrocket Burning Hunk

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    Why are you even lining it? That looks like a typical 6 inch masonry chimney to me.

    Get it inspected and hire a mason with the money you were going to use on the liner.
  25. Jason867

    Jason867 New Member

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    The diameter is actually 8-1/2" inside the chimney. My stove has a 6" flue. It's my understanding that for best draft I should use that 6" diameter all the way up.

    I also read that 99% of existing chimneys need relined or something. Mine looks like it's in nice shape, but I figure I don't know any better.

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