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  1. Treemoss

    Treemoss Member

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    LI NY
    Lol, ok Dix thank you for the info. I can get a full seasoned cord delivered for 180 not far away. But I have to see if its seasoned.
    Backwoods Savage likes this.

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  2. Doing The Dixie Eyed Hustle

    Doing The Dixie Eyed Hustle Minister of Fire

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    If it's seasoned, it's a deal.
    Backwoods Savage likes this.
  3. lumbering on

    lumbering on Feeling the Heat

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    New York
    Prianti farms is expensive. $175 per FACE cord.

    http://www.priantifarmsinc.com/Home_Page.html
  4. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Gotta say you are really stacking the deck against success. A poor flue, poor wood and perhaps the wrong stove combined have the potential to make for a bad experience. Maybe pass for now and look at ALL the options, including getting an easy breathing stove if this is really the only option for chimney location.
    Huntindog1, Joful and Mitch Newton like this.
  5. Treemoss

    Treemoss Member

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    Really, What would you think would be a good set up and a good stove for my application.
  6. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    For your setup I think you might do better with a cat stove with no secondary manifold air. The Woodstock Fireview would be a good size. This is what Backwoods Savage is burning and it has worked well with his setup. A Buck 20 catalytic stove might also work if you prefer steel. Pacific Energy's stoves have a short secondary manifold that seems to breath a bit easier than the Nappys. I have a friend that has one on a poor chimney setup and it gets a decent secondary burn, but not nearly as good as we get with a straight up chimney.
    Backwoods Savage likes this.
  7. Treemoss

    Treemoss Member

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    I little to rich for my pocket right now. I have ordered the napoleon 1450 already. I can maybe just maybe change to the napoleon 1400pl only. If he lets me even.
  8. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Sounds like your course is set. Adding some extra pipe up top and bracing it may help. Try to pitch the horiz. run up 1/4" per ft. and watch clearances at all points, especially at the tee.
    Backwoods Savage likes this.
  9. Treemoss

    Treemoss Member

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    Thank you, I talked to the chimmey installer and he said he will put an additional 4 foot height above the gutter and pitch the horizontal quarter inch per foot. Do you think the smaller stove my be better for my Application. Or do you think a catalytic stove would be better than my secondary air noncatalytic stove.
  10. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    This is not a matter of stove size. It is more a matter of how the stove breathes. Stoves are not all built the same. Some have long secondary preheat manifolds and others are shorter. Some cats have no secondary air feed at all. Draft is the engine that drives the stove. Dry wood is just the fuel.

    What will the total vertical rise be from stove top to stove cap?
  11. Treemoss

    Treemoss Member

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    There will be total of 20 vertical ft. Without the 4 ft horizontal and the offset passed the gutter.see pic.
    image.jpg image.jpg
  12. Doing The Dixie Eyed Hustle

    Doing The Dixie Eyed Hustle Minister of Fire

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    BG is like freaking Obi Wan Kenobi



    **apologies in advance for the hijack**

    ;lol
    Huntindog1 and firefighterjake like this.
  13. firefighterjake

    firefighterjake Minister of Fire

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    Which makes me wonder . . . which hearth.com member is Yoda? Han Solo? Chewbacca? Princess Leia? Luke Skywalker? Darth Vader? The Emperor?

    I think I would make a fine ewok. ;)
  14. Tenn Dave

    Tenn Dave Feeling the Heat

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    Hi Treemoss,
    I just happened upon a website that advertises chimney power draft fans. I have no idea if these work, but if they do, it might be the answer to your problem. Perhaps someone with some experience with these can crime in. I have attached the link to the website. There is a video on the site which explains the whole process. Good luck.
    http://www.tjernlund.com/Hearth.htm
    Last edited: Sep 4, 2013
  15. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    The farce is strong Luke.
    PapaDave likes this.
  16. Machria

    Machria Minister of Fire

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    Brookhaven, Long Island
    Treemoss,
    I would lose the 2 thirty's at the top, and cut a hole in the roof/sofit, and go straight thru/up. Two reasons, one is for better draft, straight pipe..., but more importantly, for strength. A support box going thru the roof will hold much better than the two 30's passing around the gutter.

    Ask me how I know this? Ok, since you ask, because I did the exact same thing you are about to do, but for my oil burner chimney. It lasted 3 weeks and the top blew over/bent/broke. They came back and re-did it thru the soffit and its 2 years later, and 2 hurricanes later (Irene, Sandy) and its still perfect.
  17. Hogwildz

    Hogwildz Minister of Fire

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    Next to nuke plant Berwick, PA.
    That is easy enough on a rake edge, but he is running at the eave. Can't just cut that out and the gutter etc. Ain't gonna work without being a PITA and looking quite awful.
    BrotherBart likes this.
  18. Joful

    Joful Minister of Fire

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    FYI... If looking for a cat stove at a good price, There's a nice Jotul Firelight 12 for sale in our forum classifieds. I'm running one on much less than 20' of chimney.
  19. Joful

    Joful Minister of Fire

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    Also for looks. He can box it in with a chase, and look less ghetto.
  20. jharkin

    jharkin Minister of Fire

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    If its oak, even split for 2 full years and cracking is no guarantee if you are not positive it was stacked in single or at most double rows with good sun/wind exposure. Wood greys and starts to crack very quickly, long before the drying process is complete. Even the best wood sellers that actually do split a year ahead usually stove the wood in massive piles. Only the top of those piles actually dries so what you end up with is a load that has a peppering of dry gray pieces and looks good, but the bulk of it is sopping wet.

    Not to mention that many dealers definition of a "cord" is a pickup load :(

    I also live in a suburban area and have to buy wood from time to time - especially my first year. I tried a number of suppliers. Some of them sold me a seasoned cord and what showed up was a pickup load that was in logs for a year and split that morning. Moisture ran 40% + :( The best guy, and the one I use to supplement now when I cant find enough free wood to cut delivers wood that was split 12 months ago and stored in heaps on blacktop (Ive seen the yard). The wood is a mix of oak, maple, ash and other hardwoods. If you used the look test you'd think it was all seasoned - as its mostly grey, cracked and makes the hollow sound. Do a split test however and the oak is in the 33-35% range !! and the other woods are around 25%. What I do is sort it and stack in single rows, the maple/ash/etc I will burn next winter (14/15), and the oak in 2 winters. The good thing is this guy delivers in a high side dually dump (think its an F350) - each cord load is over 200ft3 loose so it sacks out to a legitimate 128ft3 cord when sorted.

    Again, the wood guy I only use to supplement when I run out of options to cut my own. For wood I cut myself I stack single row and aim for 2 full summers of seasoning time minimum before burning.
    Joful likes this.
  21. Joful

    Joful Minister of Fire

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    Short bed: 6.5' L x 5' W, would need to be stacked as a cube 4' high to make 1 cord

    Long bed: 8.25' L x 5' W, would need stacked as a cube 3' high to make 1 cord

    No way in hell you're fitting a cord in a pickup without stake sides, not to mention a cord of most woods (green) is too heavy for the average pickup:

    Ash: 4237 lb./cord, green
    Red Oak: 4886 lb./cord, green

    You're into dually territory, here. Not many firewood dealers with dual wheel pickups, around here.
  22. Treemoss

    Treemoss Member

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    LI NY
    I dont care if its cat non-cat all I want is to make sure I have a good draft and a proper running stove. I don't want smoke issues and bad Creosote problems.
    But I feel I'm going to have problems with my offsets and 45s and I'm thinking maybe I shouldn't put in a stove now.
  23. Grisu

    Grisu Minister of Fire

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    Maybe you just need a very creative solution like just looking at a floorplan and determining from there what would be the best location for the stove. After that you can figure out how to arrange the furniture.

    Another option: Ever thought of extending the room onto your porch and getting a straight sidewall? It is probably too expensive for you right now but could be something to keep in mind.
  24. Treemoss

    Treemoss Member

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    Well I'm having a different chimney installer come today and maybe see what options he thinks would be best to run.
  25. bag of hammers

    bag of hammers Minister of Fire

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    Northern ON
    The veterans here are giving great advice. I'm just harping on here but I just feel the need to chime anyway, on focusing a bit - don't sacrifice a bit of function / stability / safety for the sake of "form". Your installer (hopefully) is a good one, just saying that the vibe I get (from reading the responses here from seasoned burners) is not a real good one. I would exhaust every possibility / option - re-arrange the room, relocate the stove so that a straight up run (or even a reasonable offset in your connector pipe) would put the chimney in proximity to any wall in the room above, and go out the roof. Your installer could get you set up and running, and a chase upstairs might even be a DIY thing you could do later, as time permits. Ironically, this might be a better look anyway, without all the chimney, bends, clamps, brackets, offsets, etc. coming out of your porch and up the wall. For sure ask the installer(s) for all options.

    Good luck with the new install....

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