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Help Selecting A Quality Stove

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by RossB, Oct 4, 2013.

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  1. Dave A.

    Dave A. Minister of Fire

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    Then prolly not worth doing the insulation. Eliminating the vapor barrier, I'd be more careful about with a hardwood floor there.

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  2. firefighterjake

    firefighterjake Minister of Fire

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    Random thoughts . . .

    Enjoying the pics and narrative . . . it's fun following this project.

    Granite slab? Slate? Soapstone slab? Just some possible ideas for the hearth if the wife isn't a fan of bluestone. One member went with a black granite slab once and I have to say it was stunning.

    Hehheh . . . I too once thought I would just be burning nights and weekends in an effort to help reduce the oil bill . . . that was a number of years ago . . . just put some oil into my oil tank this Summer . . . I think the last time the oil company swung by was in 2007. Once you see the view of the fire, feel the heat and get into the swing of things and see how easy it can be to run the stove you may find yourself burning a lot more . . . heck, honestly, for me it is often more work having to start a fire from a cold start vs. just reloading on coals.
  3. HotCoals

    HotCoals Minister of Fire

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    Ours is similar to what you are doing.
    The guy that did this one left the bricks out from the wall I guess a inch or so.
    Towards the bottom and top of the" walls" he left gaps in the bricks so that air could travel behind.
    I'm not sure why he went to that trouble but I guess he did it to keep the wall cooler.
    I don't know if that's something you might want to look into or not..just thought I would throw that out there.
    I could get a better pic if you're interested.

    EDIT: I went back and looked at your pics again and I see you have no need to do what they did here. I think i just have drywall behind the brick.
    Last edited: Nov 2, 2013
  4. RossB

    RossB Member

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    Busy day today...we hit the roof bright and early to install the chimney...I had already mocked the stove up and dropped a plumb bob to figure out exactly where to cut the hole...I took some pictures along the way, but please don't assume that I have any expertise in this area...I just thought it might be fun for some of you folks following along at home to see the whole process from shopping for the stove all the way to actual fire. I'm sure that I'll make some blunders along the way.

    Step 1: Clear the insulation where the chimney is going to go.

    [​IMG]



    Step 2: Installing some blocking to make a 12"x12" frame for the Ceiling Support Box. My rafters are 2x12s so I used a few 2x6s to block from ceiling to roof.

    [​IMG]
  5. RossB

    RossB Member

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    Meanwhile, up on the roof, my buddy Kyle is stripping shingles that we just installed about a month ago...cursing me as he goes...

    [​IMG]
  6. RossB

    RossB Member

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    Step 3: COMMITMENT...cutting a hole in my brand new roof...this just feels so wrong...

    [​IMG]
  7. RossB

    RossB Member

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    STEP 4: PENETRATION...err...umm...well...you know...stick the big black thing in the hole...ummm...no...I mean...well....the ceiling support thingy...time to see if it actually fits...

    I marked the support box at the 3" from the bottom so I'd know just how far to slide it up...3" at the rafter should be just over 2" once I put the ceiling back up...pre-drilled a couple holes in the side of the box for mounting (that's Kyle's job up top)...got the 2' level and put it right where I want it...then I yelled up for him to drive in a few screws.

    THis seems about right...

    [​IMG]
  8. RossB

    RossB Member

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    Up on the roof...

    We discussed how to handle the portion of the box that extends above the roof. I considered just cutting it off flushwith the roof sheathing, but instead, we trimmed it off about 1.5" above the roof, cut the corners with snips, and then folded over the sides to create a flange of sorts. With screws already going through the walls of the box and into the blocking/rafters, this was complete overkill, but it felt right at the time. I'm pretty sure that I can swing from the support box now and it will never move.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
  9. RossB

    RossB Member

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    So, with Norm Abram up on the roof working his magic and dry fitting the shingles, I set to unpacking my shiny new chimney pipes, cap, and braces. This stuff is shinier than my Harley...I hate to even touch it...a 4 footer and a 3 footer ought to get me the chimney height I need. Time to get up on the roof and start slinging the roofing tar...lots and lots of tar...

    [​IMG]
    Last edited: Nov 2, 2013
  10. RossB

    RossB Member

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    We had a slight difference of opinion on the flashing...I was inclined to take a much simpler path that I had seen in the Duratech installation instructions and Kyle was intent on going a little more extreme...I really couldn't find much fault with his approach though...he certainly covered all of the bases...water isn't getting in there unless the entire house is submerged...lots of gooey roofing tar under there.

    I put on the storm collar, but I wasn't totally satisfied with the locking tab design so I used a couple pop rivets to keep everything nice and tight. Unfortunately, the high temp silver caulk had a real loose consistency and I made a bit of a mess with it. I'm not entirely proud of the caulking job on the storm collar. I suspect that it will be water-tight however.

    [​IMG]
  11. RossB

    RossB Member

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    The chimney pipe screwed together easily with 1/4 turn or so to engagement...making sure that the seam is facing the house for maximum aesthetic pleasure from below...then the cap and finally, with the help of a 2' level, the braces.

    Now all I need is that crew of Munchkins from the Wizard of Oz to give it the same buff treatment that the Tin Man got...

    [​IMG]
  12. RossB

    RossB Member

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    Down on the ground, things are looking pretty good...the chimney is about 14' from the main house and the wind blows due east from that mountain in the distance. I'm definitely good with the whole 2' from the top/10' from the roof thing.

    [​IMG]
  13. RossB

    RossB Member

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    Off to the building supply store for 600lbs of mortar mix and some cedar clap board. I really need to get this place buttoned up before the snow comes. I made a little headway before the rain came...

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    The whole back side of the house could use a coat of pain next summer.
  14. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    Nice looking pipe sticking out of a great looking house.
  15. RossB

    RossB Member

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    Very kind of you to say.
  16. Holiday

    Holiday Member

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    Looks great. Is there a reason you went with the length you did as opposed to shorter if it still met code?
  17. RossB

    RossB Member

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    I think the wife will warm up to the blue stone. I think I'm going to go with it. My guy at the building supply place thinks he can get me the entire slab in a single piece of 1.5" thick bluestone. I'm sure it will weight a ton (400lbs actually), but I think it would look really good when its done. I'm also going to try adding some Raven color to the mortar for something a little different.
  18. RossB

    RossB Member

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    Manufacturer's recommendation...12-14' total from the bottom of the stove to the top of the chimney. I think I'll be right in the middle of the range.
  19. Holiday

    Holiday Member

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    Makes sense, mine ended up being in that 13' range but only 4' sticking out above the roof.
  20. RossB

    RossB Member

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    You know, now that I think about it...there's no way that the chimney is 11' long. I went out and looked at the boxes...turns out it was a 4' and a 3' section of chimney pipe. The chimney is 7' tall from the bottom of the support box which equates to about 6' above the roof. I think the double wall stove pipe will be about 6' in the house. I think I'll be about 13' when it's all said and done.
  21. Holiday

    Holiday Member

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    Makes more sense to me now, 11' feet is a lot of chimney.
  22. RossB

    RossB Member

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    I read up a little a couple weeks ago about the air gap you're talking about. My understanding is that I could use that method to decrease the required distance to flammable materials, but since the stove I purchased is shielded and only requires 6" clearance to combustible material, I gave up on the pursuit. While the idea of air flow behind the bricks makes sense to me, I never found a comprehensive definition of just how much you could safely reduce the clearance distances. Maybe its a brick mason secret.
  23. bag of hammers

    bag of hammers Minister of Fire

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    [quote="RossB, post: 1562057, member: 28787"
    I put on the storm collar, but I wasn't totally satisfied with the locking tab design so I used a couple pop rivets to keep everything nice and tight. Unfortunately, the high temp silver caulk had a real loose consistency and I made a bit of a mess with it. I'm not entirely proud of the caulking job on the storm collar. I suspect that it will be water-tight however.

    [/quote]
    Ross don't sweat the caulking thing - as long as its watertight you got 'er beat. Nice job - you guys are on fire (no pun intended)...
  24. firefighterjake

    firefighterjake Minister of Fire

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    Does Kyle know he's now famous here at Hearth.com? ;)
  25. RossB

    RossB Member

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    No, he didn't even see me taking the pictures. The only thing he uses the internet for is to shop for race car parts. I'm sure he'd wonder why I'd ever bother documenting this process in the first place.
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