Help with Englander stove igniter!!

p8ntballer789 Posted By p8ntballer789, Mar 4, 2013 at 6:09 PM

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  1. p8ntballer789

    p8ntballer789
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    Mar 4, 2013
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    Just out of curiosity, how come i should not solder the new leads onto the old ones?
     
  2. SmokeyTheBear

    SmokeyTheBear
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    It has to do with the melting points of some solder being lower than the temperature of some parts of the stove that the joint may find itself near. The insulation on the wiring is a high temperature insulation.

    ETA: Solder has melting points ranging from 244::F to 585::F.
     
  3. p8ntballer789

    p8ntballer789
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    Mar 4, 2013
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    ohhhh ok. so using one of the blue butt splice connecters will be ok then? attempting to do it in a few minutes
     
  4. SmokeyTheBear

    SmokeyTheBear
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    I don't know what they have for a temperature rating, you need to take that into account when doing anything with a stove.
     
  5. p8ntballer789

    p8ntballer789
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    ok thanks for the input i appreciate it!
     
  6. Harvey Schneider

    Harvey Schneider
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    Thanks for the assist there, Smokey.
    People don't realize that soldering isn't welding. With igniters reaching well over 1000 deg it doesn't take long for heat to backtrack along the wires to the solder joint and bring it to the melting point. I have even seen active electronic components melt the solder off their leads when the soldered connection was not properly cooled during operation of the circuit. A good gas tight mechanical connection (crimp) will never have those problems.
     
  7. SmokeyTheBear

    SmokeyTheBear
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    Anytime Harvey.

    Inside the shell of a stove is a very harsh environment for things mechanical, electrical, or electronic.
     
  8. Idahokid

    Idahokid
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    Should you be able to feel the warm air coming out of the igniter hole.I have a friend who just picked up a refurb model.The igniter comes on as you can see a red glow in a hole right of the auger.But want light the pellets.It runs for 20 minutes and shuts of. they get lit manually.
     
  9. SmokeyTheBear

    SmokeyTheBear
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    You should be able to feel heat above the burn pot over the igniter hole, do not place anything in front of that igniter hole as it can get very hot there even if it doesn't light the pellets, it is a severe burn risk.

    The area around the igniter may have some dirt in it or the igniter is improperly positioned in the stove. I'd suggest that your friend call England. In some cases (high altitude situations) there is an additional air hole that has to be opened to allow enough air to be heated to start a fire.
     
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