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High cost of Flue

Post in 'The Boiler Room - Wood Boilers and Furnaces' started by Bspring, Jan 20, 2008.

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  1. Bspring

    Bspring Feeling the Heat

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    Aug 3, 2007
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    Loc:
    Greenville, SC
    I am looking at new construction and have been told to expect $2,000 for a flue and a two story house with a basement. I was wanting to put a wood furnace in the basement. There has to be a less expensive way to do this. Any ideas?

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  2. Gagz

    Gagz New Member

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    Jan 14, 2008
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    Loc:
    Rush City,Minnesota
    I have a Kozy Heat ZC31 on the main floor of a rambler with 23' of Class A that was installed in a wood chase back in '03 and I just went and found the receipt . It was $1036 back then.
  3. ericjeeper

    ericjeeper New Member

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    central Indiana
    Menards has six inch type A on sale for 56 dollars for 36 inch section.normally 62
  4. derbygreg

    derbygreg New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2007
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    Loc:
    Columbus - Hilliard, OH
    The cost of steel and especially stainless steel has gone way up.

    For example back in 2003 when we took a car to the shreadder we would get around $25.00 per ton so perhaps $50.00 for a car.

    Last week we took a 300ZX to the shreadder and got $350.00 for the car. They were paying over $200.00 per ton.

    My chimney is about 30 feet and I believe I paid over $2000 - partially because I have an offset.
  5. Bspring

    Bspring Feeling the Heat

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    Loc:
    Greenville, SC
    I assume that on new construction a masonry chimney would be even more? Are there any alternatives to the stainless steal chimney that might be less expensive?
  6. pbvermont

    pbvermont Member

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    Yes, a masonry chimney would be more expensive. However, I sense you are trying to get by with an "inexpensive chimney." Now, there is something about this phrase that troubles me. Think about it...an inexpensive chimney. I would not sleep very well with such a thing in my house.
    Especially since you are building new, don't skimp on an important feature like a chimney. A high quality masonry chimney with appropriately sized refractory flue tiles is a thing of beauty. An interior chimney will add MUCH thermal mass to the house, it will draw magnificently and add much to the value of the house. You will sleep better. Safe AND warm.
    Take some money out of the stock market and put it into something real like a safe chimney. Heck, go borrow some money and do it. You can't make a better investment.
  7. berlin

    berlin New Member

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    Western NY
    building a masonry chimney yourself using not brick but concrete "chimney block" (made for that purpose) lined with, ideally round, self-aligning flue tiles, you will save yourself a lot of money IF you build it yourself, it's not terribly difficult or time consuming to do. and if you have any questions your local masonry supply house will be glad to help you out.

    use concrete chimney block

    round self-aligning clay tile if possible, if not square tile that fits the block is fine too.

    use fireclay between all clay liners

    type S mortar between the chimney blocks

    remember 2" clearance from combustibles, including framing etc.

    suitable foundation of your design, generally a 6" thick reinforced concrete pad sitting on undisturbed inorganic soil that extends 36" in all directions from the chimney will be more than addiquit for most soil types and most residential chimney heights.
  8. Eric Johnson

    Eric Johnson Mod Emeritus

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    I don't think you can buy round clay tiles anymore, but I agree, they would be the best choice.
  9. WRVERMONT

    WRVERMONT New Member

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    Stainless chimneys are excellent technology and expensive and safe! Pbvermont is Absolutely Right! For new construction, splurge for a well built masonry chimney. My two cents.
  10. berlin

    berlin New Member

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    "I don’t think you can buy round clay tiles anymore"

    they were for a time getting to be harder to find, however most manufacturors switching to self-aligning ends (male/female) has made them more popular in recent years and now are becoming easier to find. they are nice because round tiles 1. draft better 2. hold up much better (when installed properly) to thermal shock/stress such as mild chimney fires, 3. self-aligning ends makes for a better, tighter seal with little to no moisture/creosote seepage.
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