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High temp mixing valves

Post in 'The Boiler Room - Wood Boilers and Furnaces' started by wdc1160, Jan 8, 2008.

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  1. wdc1160

    wdc1160 New Member

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    I have looked high and low for a vendor with mixing valves that support over 200F on the outlet side.
    Anybody ever done anything with this? I probably need 4 way, but I could work with 3 way If I found something.

    Thanks guys

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  2. Eric Johnson

    Eric Johnson Mod Emeritus

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    I can email you a brochure for a Termovar Loading Valve, Bill, which looks like a mixing valve to me, with a max temp of 110 C. Let me know if you're interested.
  3. wdc1160

    wdc1160 New Member

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    I was actually looking for mixing temps that are higher. I dl'ed the brochure online. It looks like an awesome company. The maximum operating temperature show 110, but I only see a mix of 80C. Do you have a specific model your looking at? Your talking to the world's worst plumber, if I am using confusing language please correct me.

    Much Thanks Bill
  4. Eric Johnson

    Eric Johnson Mod Emeritus

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    I'm not familiar with mixing valves, other than the manual kind, so I guess I don't know the difference between the max operating temp and the mixing temp. My thinking is that you can put water up to 110 degrees (230 F) into one side of the valve and presumably it will raise the mixed water temp accordingly, depending on the input temp.

    Are you saying you want a mixed water temp higher than 175? I think the spec sheet I have is generic to all their models. It does say that they can provide you with a valve set up to handle different temps than the ones listed, so it might be worth further inquiry. I got the spec sheet from Cozy Heat, so presumably they can provide more details.
  5. wdc1160

    wdc1160 New Member

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    If you ever want a good laugh call Taco Corp and listen to the gal on the outgoing message.
    She has the thickest NY accent possible. She must have been selectivly bred from other NY orkers with the harshest accents possible.
  6. wdc1160

    wdc1160 New Member

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    Yes hotter than 175.

    If by manual, you mean that you turn nob and it only will allow water to go out the "outlet"(into stove) that is a minimum temp > 180, then that is the same thing I am talking about. Bottom line is I am trying to get hotter water into the stove. I am about ready to try and concoct something myself-- so we better find something quick.
  7. wdc1160

    wdc1160 New Member

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    I found it. Thanks for you help eric.

    This is what I was talking about
    Link
  8. Eric Johnson

    Eric Johnson Mod Emeritus

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    Nope, you lost me, man.

    I guess what I'm talking about is actually a tempering valve. All it does is mix hot and cold water to produce something in between, typically for stepping down the temp of DHW when you've got your tank up to 200 degrees or so.

    The automatic mixing valves I'm familiar with allow you to take hot water from the boiler supply and mix it with cooler return water, to produce something in between to avoid low return water temps in order to protect the boiler from corrosion. I'm trying to figure out what two sources of water you would be mixing to result in an output of higher than 80C, or why you would want to.

    But people do a lot of fancy things with mixing valves that go way beyond my knowledge. If you want to elaborate, I'm all eyeballs.

    Taco is headquartered in Rhode Island, so I'm at a loss to explain the NY accent. Do you mean a Brooklyn NY accent, or a Long Island accent? Or perhaps the Queens derivation?

    Seriously, maybe they checked out the demographics of their customer base and concluded that the vast majority reside in the greater NYC area. Or, perhaps you're confusing a Rhode Island accent with one from NYC. Being from Wisconsin originally myself, everybody east of the PA/OH line talks funny.
  9. wdc1160

    wdc1160 New Member

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    I know it wasn't Jersey, but beyond that I cannot identify.

    I am trying to accomplish 2 things.
    1. Not having to replumb (my worst fear) - by having more flexibility with return temps
    2. Potentially higher effciency - because of either smaller delta of (in/out). Or, higher overall temps with a 20 degree delta.

    All in an effort to find the sweet spot.

    Now how I am going to do this is not certain. Likely not possible with this step alone, but I know it bridges a large gap.
    As a general rule I like to run things hotter than 180 out.


    But here are some of my solid fuel burning axioms.
    1. if you control inlet temperature and damper you control the boiler circ
    2. if you run a boiler "cold" or with "large" deltas, then you have smothered/idled the boiler - a little.
    3 If it doesn't endanger someone, cause wear, or hurt the pocket, then hotter is better.
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