historical wood

ScotO Posted By ScotO, Nov 12, 2012 at 9:07 AM

  1. eclecticcottage

    eclecticcottage
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    Renos NEVER stay on time, in my experiance. I wanted ours done by thanksgiving too...I don't think it's gonna happen though, lol.

    Ditto. We're adding some beadboard in the last two rooms without wood on the walls shortly. I thought about lake stone as the backsplash in the kitchen...then I remembered grouting the hearthpad and decided to cheat and use faux brick panels, lol.

    BTW, don't let that super seasoned pine overnight burn fool you, they don't grow them like that anymore, lol.
     
  2. ScotO

    ScotO
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    I know, that wood is denser than some hard maple I have. The annual rings are amazingly tight, almost need a magnifying glass to see them all. That old, virgin timber is definately a cut above almost everything you can get today.....
    Good luck on your reno, Eclectic......any pics of your project? I'd love to do a mountain stone backsplash in our kitchen, someday down the road.
     
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  3. eclecticcottage

    eclecticcottage
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    Yup, see the link to the blog in my sig. I do need to update it with some more recent pics.
     
  4. firefighterjake

    firefighterjake
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    Very, very cool.
     
  5. Sprinter

    Sprinter
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    How easy was your stuff to work with? I built a barn in the 80's with old Douglas fir that came from a demo'd 100 year old sawmill. (Sorry, but 100 years is actually pretty old out here). The dimensional lumber, especially the 2x6's, were so hard, I couldn't drive a nail through them. Might as well have been petrified. Really strong, though.
     
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  6. osagebow

    osagebow
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    Would love to find some stuff like that. I'm sure it's gonna look great! I remember a study of 800 year old cypress tree rings suggesting Roanoke and Jamestown were affected by severe droughts. Rings from those time periods were all piled together.
     
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  7. Senatormofo

    Senatormofo
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    Scotty, we will let your deadline slide as long as you promise to post pics! Looking forward to seeing the completed project!! (I'm sure your wife is too!)
     
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  8. fishingpol

    fishingpol
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    Nice piece of history there Scott. I'm all for a good wood repurpose project.

    I've read that enormous pines in New England were called "Kingswood". They were crown property to be used for masts in building the Brittish Navy. The Brittish even had ships with doors in the stern that would open to allow the tree to be slid into the ship under the deck. Woodcutting was highly regulated back in colonial times.
     
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  9. Thistle

    Thistle
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    November 2010 my neighbor replaced the shingles & most of the sheathing on his 1906 Craftsman 1 1/2 story house.Originally had clay tile roof but he had that removed in early 90's.Still had exposed 6 x 6,5 x 5 & 4 x 4 old growth Doug Fir beams/braces with a 24" overhang.That was in need of major repair,was sagging pretty good.

    They removed all the old wood,reduced the overhang to 18" & fabricated new 'non-load-bearing' braces from 4 x 4 western red cedar w/ a 2 x 8 backplate attaching them where the old ones were.Everything reduced slightly in size,looks really good since it all matches now.

    I ended up with all the old beams/braces removed - anywhere from 2 to 4 ft long,after trimming/squaring all the pieces with mortices/tenons,rot,large knots etc..Removed a few broken nails (I have a small hand held metal detector also) & they're covered with several layers of paint.But its the tightest grain Doug Fir I've seen in decades,an amazing orangish-red color.Will be great for small decorative boxes,woodturning & other things.1 really nice 3ft 4 x 4 will eventually be the column for a plant stand I'll surprise my neighbors with soon.....
     

    Attached Files:

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  10. fishingpol

    fishingpol
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    Drooling here Thistle. Nice score.
     
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