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Holtz Hausen

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by BucksCoBernie, Sep 7, 2009.

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  1. adrpga498

    adrpga498 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    853
    Loc:
    New Jersey
    Good work on your 1st.HH Having built 6 or more over the past few years I do recommend a wide base. Approximately 7ft. diamater minimum. The last few I built had a 4 pallet base. All had a slight tapper to a narrower top. Eachl stayed well intact,and as you mentioned I have always found a "foothold" step as it gets taller.

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  2. golfandwoodnut

    golfandwoodnut Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2009
    Messages:
    1,413
    Loc:
    Pittsburgh PA
    adrpga498 it looks like we have more than one thing in common, HH's, Golf and I just bought a Jotul 550, great minds think alike!? Just wondering with all your experience how well the HH's have seasoned for you?
  3. adrpga498

    adrpga498 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    853
    Loc:
    New Jersey
    My HH have seasoned very well. I wouldn't try to burn any split without at least 8 months drying time regardless of how they have been stacked.
    There are a few reasonsons I prefer the HH. 1. less room to store more wood. 2. Gets wind and sun from all sides. 3. Stable. 4. Can hide strange size splits in the center without adverse affects on stacking. 5. No tarps needed.6. Good conversation piece, in suburbia. Kinda like trying top down burn fire starting. Onece you get the
    hang of building a hh. you won't hesitate building another.
  4. mnowaczyk

    mnowaczyk Member

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2009
    Messages:
    228
    Loc:
    Delaware
    Anyone built one of these on a hill? Bad idea for the first one? I've got about a 30 degree slope behind my garage and think this would be perfect. The hill behind my house is open to a street with houses on the other side. So I'd be a little worried about my wood disappearing. I'd know immediately if someone started stealing my wood with a HH.

    I'm in a "city", or at least a neighborhood of the city that feels a bit like suburbia and have only 40'x150' of land and a house that's attached on one side. I've got enough room next to my garage for maybe 2 cords or so, but the sun and wind there will be limited. The hill behind my garage would be great for seasoning, especially if I could figure out a way to use it... and assure the wood won't disappear. I think I could easily fit two of these if it's possible to built one on a hill.

    I would think sliding down the hill would be a huge concern. Maybe if I staked a few pallets into the ground, and have splits sticking up to brace the pile?

    Anyone ever tried one on a hill?
  5. golfandwoodnut

    golfandwoodnut Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2009
    Messages:
    1,413
    Loc:
    Pittsburgh PA
    Mine is on a small slope. I really don't think you will have a problem with a hill. Just put more splits on the low end to get it level with the front. Always keep the wood sloping inwards for strength. That is one of the great things about a HH, being level is not a big deal.
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