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How do I find a stud...............

Post in 'DIY and General non-hearth advice' started by WoodMann, Oct 9, 2009.

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  1. Gooserider

    Gooserider Mod Emeritus

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    VERY NICE TOOL!!! That is a good reference pointer for certain....
    Gooserider

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  2. WoodMann

    WoodMann Minister of Fire

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    Thanks guys, and thanks for a link to that sagulator. Good call on the heavy look I'd be ending up with, Goose; that's exactly what I don't want- focus being drawn to the cabinet. Thinking back thru the daysand remembering that a 3/4" of 4x8 plywood for a ramp for the 3- wheeler was more than adequate I wonder now if 1/2" would infact be suficient. I see you're point goose for considerint 16" rather than 18" shelves, and no problems with that it was just the ultimate width of the topmost shelf as well as housing the TV up there I'd also mybe like another couple knick knacks ans such.
    With that, what's luan? Guess I could Goggle that. Also, this is grea- if I could do the sides out of ont peice, hopefully 1/2" ply that would free me up to get a bit more creative with vent holes for the electronics rather than the bland ladder look................
  3. Gooserider

    Gooserider Mod Emeritus

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    Luan is a fairly low grade plywood that is typically about 3 ply, 1/4" thick... Usually sells for very little money, and has a nice but bland finish that can be stained or painted. It's usually used to give smooth surfaces, but doesn't have a lot of strength itself... Common applications include the bottoms of furniture drawers, the backs of shelves, cabinets, and other "box like" furniture carcasses and underlayment for some sorts of flooring... It doesn't have real good load bearing ability, but it is good on the back of a peice of furniture to prevent diagonal racking.

    As to the thickness of stuff - there is a balance, going to thin can look problematic even if it is "structurally sound" - I think the optimal range to the eye is in the 3/4 - 1" range... More or less just doesn't look right....

    The other thing that might be worth looking at is what the options are in pre-fab - not as satisfying as making it yourself, but what I've observed is that often times, unless you want something unusual in the way of size, color or whatever, the folks at IKEA and so forth can do a pre-fab for nearly as good a cost as doing it yourself...

    Gooserider
  4. WoodMann

    WoodMann Minister of Fire

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    Ya mean have them cobble something together to your specs? Sounds cool, but I don't totally know what I want yet. I've ben thinking of doing a mock up with some cardboard. Hey, the cat just ate my waffle asw I was typing...............
  5. WoodMann

    WoodMann Minister of Fire

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    Here's what I was thinking about geting a bit creative on the sides. Was thinking I could fortify the structure via a 2x4 front and back at the bottom and another one at the top rear....

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  6. Gooserider

    Gooserider Mod Emeritus

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    No, I wasn't talking about having IKEA make something for you, rather just to look at what they have in the way of stock items to see if something works - I haven't seen anything all that unusual in your specs, and 36" W x 36" H x 16-18" deep is a pretty standard size...

    I haven't tried it, but I've heard cats are fairly good when deep fried and served w/ ketchup... At least it will keep it from bothering your waffle again :p

    As to the idea with the hole, that might work, though I'd still put some holes in the shelves for wiring passages. That way the wires don't show - if you just had the wires looped around the front or sides of the shelves it would look kind of tacky. Wouldn't need all that much reinforcing either, as long as you keep the size of the opening reasonable and allow at least a couple inches of "meat" front and back... One of the advantages of using sheet materials is that they offer tremendous resistance to diagonal "racking" forces, as they in effect act like an infinite number of diagonal cross braces. 3/4" ply can more than handle the vertical load and putting a back on the carcasse prevents it from going side to side, while the depth of the panel keeps it stable fore and aft...

    Gooserider
  7. kenny chaos

    kenny chaos Minister of Fire

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    Walmart.
  8. WoodMann

    WoodMann Minister of Fire

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    Hmm- I've been negating the thought of addressing putting a back on the shelf. But seeing now how it would contribute significantly to the structureal rigitdity. Yeah- as for running wires I guess I could leave a corner hacked out outta the rear of the shelves. But yeh- I'm gonna checkout wallyworld, armed with a tap measure......................
  9. Gooserider

    Gooserider Mod Emeritus

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    As I mentioned earlier, cut out both corners, or drill TWO large holes (possibly less obvious if you can hide the holes and wires behind the equipment) - AC and signal wires shouldn't be run next to each other, so you should have one passage for power and one for signals...

    Gooserider
  10. WoodMann

    WoodMann Minister of Fire

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    Gotcha- thanks again, Goose...............
  11. pybyr

    pybyr Minister of Fire

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    Along with the knock on the wall trick, get a small cheap but strong magnet (rip apart a cheap radio's speaker or a hard drive) and put it on a string about a foot long.

    When you think you have found the stud by the knock on the wall trick, get out the aforementioned magnetic pendulum, and move it up and down the vertical axis of the suspected stud, and then also move it side to side- just slightly off the surface of the wall.

    It should be attracted quite noticeably to the sheetrock nails or screws, thus giving you a closer read than the knock on the wall method by itself.

    Cheap studfinders give poor/ erratic readings and crap out in a few years.
  12. WoodMann

    WoodMann Minister of Fire

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    Thanks, pybyr- I'll confirm my stud findings with the hanging magnet...........
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