How do you stack your wood grain side up or bark side up?

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by FireaddictSC, Nov 16, 2009.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. FireaddictSC

    FireaddictSC
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2008
    Messages:
    19
    Likes Received:
    0
    Loc:
    Cowpens SC
    I just finished bucking, spliting, and stacking a red oak that i cut down. While i was stacking the splits i placed most pieces grain side up thinking maybe it would speed up the drying process. Is there any truth to this, or stacking the splits how ever they may fall will dry at the same rate. I only ask this because i know red oak can take a long time to season properly. Thanks for the feed back i have one more large red oak to take down due to draught.
     
    Collapse Signature Expand Signature

    Helpful Sponsor Ads!





  2. jeff_t

    jeff_t
    Expand Collapse
    Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2008
    Messages:
    4,150
    Likes Received:
    1,098
    Loc:
    SE MI
    I never put any thought into it, but apparently my subconciuos tells me bark down. My wife pointed that out to me one day.
    I stack for stability.
    At any rate, you're not going to burn it this winter or next. By that time I don't think you'll notice the difference.

    Jeff
     
    Collapse Signature Expand Signature
  3. adrpga498

    adrpga498
    Expand Collapse
    Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    874
    Likes Received:
    113
    Loc:
    New Jersey
    Oh boy , watch the sparks fly on this debate. I do both, bark down on 90% of hh then bark up for the top shingles .
     
    Collapse Signature Expand Signature
  4. Hurricane

    Hurricane
    Expand Collapse
    Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2009
    Messages:
    565
    Likes Received:
    2
    Loc:
    Central NJ
    There will be many of opinions on both sides of that question.
    I have stacked how the split fits best in the space when stacking. If the wood is top covered so water and snow does not lay on your stack I do not think it will matter.

    Just my opinion.
     
    Collapse Signature Expand Signature
  5. JustWood

    JustWood
    Expand Collapse
    Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2007
    Messages:
    3,596
    Likes Received:
    503
    Loc:
    Arrow Bridge,NY
    My wood goes on a heap for 2 years then in the shed for 6-12 months. Don't worry about what side up.
     
    Collapse Signature Expand Signature
  6. KeepItNatural

    KeepItNatural
    Expand Collapse
    Member

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2009
    Messages:
    141
    Likes Received:
    0
    Loc:
    Western Conn
    I stack it bark side up when I can- I'll go out of my way to do it- but some splits don't have any at all- so there's nothing i can do for those. Plus, sometimes its just the nature of the wood I have on hand and all that junk. So long story short- bark side up for me when I can do it.
     
    Collapse Signature Expand Signature
  7. LLigetfa

    LLigetfa
    Expand Collapse
    Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2008
    Messages:
    7,361
    Likes Received:
    110
    Loc:
    NW Ontario
    Bark side up, of course!
     
    Collapse Signature Expand Signature
  8. donatello

    donatello
    Expand Collapse
    Member

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2007
    Messages:
    68
    Likes Received:
    0
    Loc:
    Connecticut
    I find the bark retains moisture. So when I stack, I prefer to have bark side up to act like a natural rain hat. I think this may help some when you have a hard rain, maybe some wind and plenty of splash. I don't get anal about it though... I do cover the TOP of my stacks with wood pallets (extra air flow/and the tarps don't get forced between the stacks of wood by the rain collecting) and a tarp fastened to the top of the pallets.
     
    Collapse Signature Expand Signature
  9. drewboy

    drewboy
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2008
    Messages:
    185
    Likes Received:
    0
    Loc:
    Lakes Region, NH
    Bark side up for "superior rain repellency".
    I made that up...but I do the top row bark side up.
     
    Collapse Signature Expand Signature
  10. kenny chaos

    kenny chaos
    Expand Collapse
    Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2008
    Messages:
    1,995
    Likes Received:
    4
    Loc:
    Rochester,ny
    I can't keep up.
    I thought we all decided to take the bark off!
     
    Collapse Signature Expand Signature
  11. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart
    Expand Collapse
    Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division
    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    32,188
    Likes Received:
    9,470
    Loc:
    Northern Virginia
    Since the bark side of a split is the wide side I stack one course bark down and then fit the wedges of the next course in the V's between them bark down for the next course for the tightest stack I can get.
     
    Collapse Signature Expand Signature
  12. fossil

    fossil
    Expand Collapse
    Accidental Moderator
    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2007
    Messages:
    10,508
    Likes Received:
    2,396
    Loc:
    Bend, OR
    I don't pay any attention to it. Wood I have stacked or heaped outside is for future years, and remains out there to season, uncovered, for a year or two, (or more) until about a year before it's gonna get burned, then it goes into the shed...where it really doesn't matter what side's up, since it's all under roof. I think if I was gonna worry about my outside wood, I'd just stack it however it wants to be stacked, then I'd throw a tarp over the top of it. I wouldn't give a thought to how the bark's oriented. A pretty good percentage of my split wood has no bark on it anyway...either it fell off or the split was from the interior of the round where there was no bark to begin with. Before my shed was built, I had wood stacked out in the open, and I just kept a tarp over the top. In fact, I stapled it to the wood in a few places to keep it from blowing off. The primary function it served was to keep the snow & ice off the wood stack, for convenience in handling and bringing it inside. Rick
     
    Collapse Signature Expand Signature
  13. quads

    quads
    Expand Collapse
    Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2005
    Messages:
    2,746
    Likes Received:
    140
    Loc:
    Central Sands, Wisconsin
    Bark side up. I don't know if it makes any difference, but the way I see it, when the tree was growing the "bark side" was exposed to the elements. So why not the bark side of the dead pieces of it too?
     
    Collapse Signature Expand Signature
  14. Bone1099

    Bone1099
    Expand Collapse
    Member

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2009
    Messages:
    165
    Likes Received:
    3
    Loc:
    Northwest GA
    I dont pay much attention to stacking it any certain way but if i were gonna stack for the fastest drying time i think vertical would allow gravity to aid in moving the moisture to the ends where it could then be evaporated. but its not a very pracitical way to stack. plus you would have to keep the ends off the ground/concrete/whatever to allow airflow but it does seem that the moisture would travel better along the grain this way. I have never tried this or studied it and maybe im just wrong. oh well just a thought.
     
    Collapse Signature Expand Signature
  15. EKLawton

    EKLawton
    Expand Collapse
    Member

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2009
    Messages:
    130
    Likes Received:
    0
    Loc:
    central pa
    +1 on the tight stack. You get a true cord that way and they don't fall over as easy ;-)
     
    Collapse Signature Expand Signature
  16. flash49

    flash49
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2009
    Messages:
    74
    Likes Received:
    0
    Loc:
    Virginia

    Does this mean I have to put the bark back on now??? I'm so confused.....
     
  17. Wood Duck

    Wood Duck
    Expand Collapse
    Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2009
    Messages:
    4,642
    Likes Received:
    777
    Loc:
    Central PA
    Which ever way fits best, but if all things are equal I put the bark up. I never used to think about it, but somewhere on this forum I read something, and now I have to think about it. Reading makes your life harder.
     
    Collapse Signature Expand Signature
  18. Stevebass4

    Stevebass4
    Expand Collapse
    Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2006
    Messages:
    845
    Likes Received:
    2
    Loc:
    Franklin MA
    who knows but the rubber roof i have covering my stacks seems to keep the water / snow out
     
    Collapse Signature Expand Signature
  19. LLigetfa

    LLigetfa
    Expand Collapse
    Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2008
    Messages:
    7,361
    Likes Received:
    110
    Loc:
    NW Ontario
    Collapse Signature Expand Signature
  20. Stevebass4

    Stevebass4
    Expand Collapse
    Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2006
    Messages:
    845
    Likes Received:
    2
    Loc:
    Franklin MA
    god i love that shed!!
     
    Collapse Signature Expand Signature
  21. joshlaugh

    joshlaugh
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    May 1, 2009
    Messages:
    330
    Likes Received:
    2
    Loc:
    Granville, Ohio
    I never really noticed how I stack, I usually do for stability and where pieces will fit. Plus I have close to three years supply of wood, so either way for me it will be dry when I finally burn the wood.
     
    Collapse Signature Expand Signature
  22. BroadCove

    BroadCove
    Expand Collapse
    Member

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2008
    Messages:
    47
    Likes Received:
    0
    Loc:
    Casco Bay, ME
    The answer is obvious: strip the bark off all of the splits, stack the wood as tightly as possible, and then weave together the bark that you've stripped off to create a natural impervious barrier to lay on top of the stacks.

    Kidding, of course. I just stack the wood, leave it outside for a year or two (depending upon species), and then burn it. We've already had 50 inches of rain this year, and I don't cover my stacks, and the wood is still plenty dry (under 20% MC). To each his own, but the keys are: split it, stack it, and leave it alone for at least a year. The rest is all personal preference.
     
    Collapse Signature Expand Signature
  23. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart
    Expand Collapse
    Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division
    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    32,188
    Likes Received:
    9,470
    Loc:
    Northern Virginia
    The most time consuming for me is planing the splits to identical sizes and weights, bar coding each one and scanning the information into the database. The stacking goes really fast.
     
    Collapse Signature Expand Signature
  24. gzecc

    gzecc
    Expand Collapse
    Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2008
    Messages:
    4,367
    Likes Received:
    844
    Loc:
    NNJ
    BB, bar codes, are the answer to my dilema! I have been writing a sn and date of origin on every split before stacking. The barcode eliminates that step. Do you glue the barcode on? I assume you attach it to the exposed end of the split.
     
    Collapse Signature Expand Signature
  25. fossil

    fossil
    Expand Collapse
    Accidental Moderator
    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2007
    Messages:
    10,508
    Likes Received:
    2,396
    Loc:
    Bend, OR
    Yeah, that, and all the time spent on the bench-mounted belt sander to get the lengths just right and the ends perfect. They sure do burn better than just regular old splits, though. I think they appreciate all the extra attention and love and just want to do whatever they can to return the favor...and, after all, what do they know how to do other than to burn? :coolsmile: Rick
     
    Collapse Signature Expand Signature
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page

Entire Site copyright © 1995-2016 - email to webinfo@hearth.com
Hearth.com and HearthNet are property and trademarks of Hearth.com LLC Advertising Information