How far should my stack be from the wall?

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by Cabin Fever, Mar 5, 2013.

  1. Cabin Fever

    Cabin Fever
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    I just picked up an old 1983 "King" model Blaze King that has an oval cat and another member here was kind enough to give me a link to it's manual. Our current cheap wood stove from Lowes has a 6 inch stack that sits 11 inches from the wall while the King will have an 8" stack that will put it at 10" from the wall. The manual states that the King's stack needs to be at least 13" from the wall. My question is will the 10" clearance be enough since the wall behind our stove is flame retardant? If not, what other options do I have?
     

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  2. chimneylinerjames

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    Single wall pipe requires 18" clearance. You could use a double wall pipe, that would reduce clearance requirements to 6". Or you could use a heat shield on the wall or on the pipe with a 1" air space to reduce the required air space.
     
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  3. webby3650

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    If Blaze King gives a minimum clearance from combustibles in their manual, than you will need to stick to that. You really aren't able to reduce clearances any further than that by code. The only way to do this properly is if the wall is made of solid masonry.
     
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  4. Bret Chase

    Bret Chase
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    there are considerably more options than that according to NFPA211...
     
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  5. webby3650

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    Not when the manufacturer lists a minimum clearance, minimum means just that, the minimum. It's not to be reduced beyond that.
     
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  6. chimneylinerjames

    chimneylinerjames
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    Agreed, NFPA does give the option to reduce clearances. For example, single wall pipe requires a minimum of 18" inches to combustibles. That is the minimum with out further protection, it can be reduced to 6" with proper protection.
     
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  7. Bret Chase

    Bret Chase
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    you might want to re-read 211....
     
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  8. webby3650

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    Single wall pipe is not listed. Listed Double wall can be 6" from combustibles, as long as it tested for this. Single wall can be reduced to 9" using a shield, per NFPA 211. Not 6".
     
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  9. webby3650

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    Old, unlisted stoves can be reduced by 2/3rds. Meaning a 36" clearance can be reduced to 12" with a proper shield, or a single wall pipe can be reduced from 18" to 9". If it's tested and listed, you must go by the published minimum clearances.
     
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  10. Bret Chase

    Bret Chase
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    No, you have to go by what the minimum the AHJ will allow...
     
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  11. webby3650

    webby3650
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    Which, if they even know, will be based on NFPA 211 or International Residential Code, unless the manufacturer has a tested and listed minimum clearance to combustible, then they will require you to go by this, regardless.
     
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  12. begreen

    begreen
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    Yes, but that means the shielding for the pipe carries all the way to the ceiling if single wall.
     
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  13. webby3650

    webby3650
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    That's right. Any place that the single wall connector pipe is closer than 18" would need to have a pipe shield.
     
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  14. webby3650

    webby3650
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    So what did you end up doing with this situation?
     
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  15. Cabin Fever

    Cabin Fever
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    We're gonna install the stove within the next week or so. I'll chime back in and let you know how it goes.
     

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