How many cord a day can you put up.

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by woodsmaster, Jul 29, 2011.

?

How many cord put up in a day.

  1. 1/2

    78.0%
  2. 1

    6.0%
  3. 1 1/2

    12.0%
  4. 2

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  5. 2 1/2

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  6. 3

    4.0%
  7. more than 3

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
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  1. woodsmaster

    woodsmaster
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    On average how many cord a day can you put up. Be Honest this not a competition. I'm talking drop the trees, cut split haul and stack. how many hours does it take and with what equipment. I can do around a cord a day with my husq. 455 and a slow 35 ton splitter. If I had a larger saw and a four way wedge on a faster splitter I could improve some. I usually only work on wood for a max of 8 hours, after that I'm worn out.

    Edit : I wanted to add that I split mine to the size of playing cards. Obviously if You use splits twice as big It wouldn't take as long to split.
     
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  2. SolarAndWood

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    I don't drop anything and it is usually all bucked when I pick it up. My process times:

    1-2 hours to pick up a cord with a 1 cord dump trailer
    1-2 hours to split and toss a cord with a 4.5" cylinder electric powered splitter that splits faster than I can feed it
    2+ years in the heap
    Upwards of an hour to stack a cord with a 2 wheeled plastic cart, a kitchen ladder and a box of beer

    Kept your poll results clean by not voting as I don't drop the trees.
     
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  3. quads

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    Leave the house with my little ATV and trailer which holds 1/6th of a cord, fell a tree and cut it up, split it by hand with my 6# maul, load splits on the trailer, haul them 1/2 mile or so home and stack, repeat. I can complete 1 1/2 cord in 8 hours from trees to stack. If I want to.......
     
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  4. kettensäge

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    I never take a tree from standing to firewood in 1 day. Not saying it's wrong but all my cutting and bucking gets done in the summer and fall, and splitting for the coming year is done in April, and immediately stacked in the shed for the coming year.

    I don't split, stack in rows to dry and restack in the shed, that to me seems like a lot of work and apparently isn't necessarty in my case.

    About 3/4's of my yearly supply (8 pickup loads) comes form a local tree guy. I pick it up at the customers location, it's stove length and stacked near the edge of the property, ready for pickup. no saw required.
    I unload and stack the rounds next to the filled woodshed and split in the spring.
     
  5. lukem

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    I would say I can do a cord in 6 hours working at a leisurely pace, not including travel time (which varies for me). I've never paid a lot of attention to time. If it starts to feel like work, I usually quit and start again another day. That's the beauty of being 3 or 4 years ahead.

    I use a 361, Huskee 22 ton, and 8lb maul. Most of what I get is pretty easy pickins...never more than a couple feet from tree to truck. If it's more than that I just drag it over with the tractor or quad.
     
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  6. muncybob

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    Same here. I have probably only once spent the majority of a day cutting/splitting. Usually I go about 4 hours excluding any travel time involved.
     
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  7. deck2

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    Burning Hunk

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    We lived in the Village when I started burning and I would have a log truck deliver log length to a friends shop outside of town, he had a tractor with a loader and a clam shell bucket, so the bucking was a bit more easier, I would easily take the logs to stacked and split in 3 days about 6-7 cords working 10-12hrs a day. Using a Stihl 310 and an old didder splitter. I would cut, split and stack right there and move to the wood shed in the fall.

    This year we moved to our own acreage so I have been cutting up standing dead and blow downs and I can usually get a 3/4 to a cord out a day. New saw Dolkita 6401, been using the fiskars more, sometimes easier than pulling the splitter out to the woods and most of the time its faster. The truck just sits in the garage (3/4 ton GMC) a purchase I justified to the wife by using savings of firewood as the reasoning, been using a small garden tractor with a 4X8 light duty trailer to go get the splits-Three trips a day seems to be about right with around a face cord at a time if the ground is dry enough to allow traction for the little garden tractor. Been stacking on pallets in the back yard. Awaiting the yet to be built wood shed. I have only had a few days to really go at it and have about 4 cords stacked at this point mostly sugar maple and some white birch and a little locust.

    Have really been interested in buying a compact tractor (25-40hp) maybe someday the finances will allow for it but not today. (Boy those things are expensive, even the older ones hold their value)

    So I voted 1 cord a day.
     
  8. Duetech

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    20 ton huskee splitter, wedges, maul, splitting maul and a fiskars splitting axe thing. One trailer load= 2/3 of a cord and about 6-7 hours when it's big rounds that are tough, gnarly and stringy. Clean popping red oak is probably 2-3 hours less. I'm saying 1/2 cord but some cuts obviously don't need splitting. I usually quit splitting when the pile gets big enough to look like I have work to do and I can be flexible (lol).
     
  9. smokinj

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    Right now 1/100th of a cord is a BIG DAY! ;-)
     
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  10. Wood Duck

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    The only time I have cut down a tree and ended up with stacked, split firewood was recently at a friend's house. Two of us cut down some trees and ended up with about 1/2 cord of stacked splits in about three hours. Other than that I never have enough time to do the entire process in a single session. I didn't answer the poll because I don't know what my answer would be.
     
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  11. golfandwoodnut

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    alot depends on the kind of wood it is, where it is. I almost never work for 8 hours and usually I cut for a day or two and then split for several days by hand. If I were to estimate a full day probably a cord.
     
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  12. oldspark

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    After I got way ahead on my firewood I split and stack the load when I get it home, less lifting that way but it may be slower, 1 cord a day at my age will be fine for me.
     
  13. mecreature

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    The way I'm doing it 1/2 at best, unless I don't have to clean up and its pretty straight forward.

    then again 4 hours is a good long day if you're bustin it.
     
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  14. Kenster

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    Just curious... why don't you split the wood when you bring it home, instead of stacking the rounds and coming back and splitting/stacking in the spring? If you split when you bring it home you'll be getting several more months of drying time, and better drying since it would be left outside, exposed to wind and sun, until you move it into your shed in the Spring - which I assume you do once you've opened up space after winter burning.

    Not being critical. I just like to read about and try to understand other peoples' methods.
     
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  15. smokinj

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    +1, 4-5 hrs tops no breaks and balls to the wall!
     
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  16. woodchip

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    You need to put a quarter of a cord up if you want my vote, that's the most I have ever actually cut, split, and stacked in a day.

    But that was collecting the wood using a wheelbarrow from a quarter mile away, no access road.

    That ought to count for something...... ;-)
     
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  17. smokinj

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    Yea a stick in the eye, Thats what I get! ;-)
     
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  18. Bigg_Redd

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    Everything depends. I've worked all day to get a cord in my truck, and I've worked 4-5 hours to get 2.
     
  19. Adios Pantalones

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    A cord in a day, not stacked, is a hard day's work for me, and I have a splitter. I dunno what I'm doing wrong but I still enjoy myself.
     
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  20. joefrompa

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    Using a fiskar's axe (2# head), the x25, I can take rounds,split, and stack them into about .5-.75 cords in a single day before I feel as worked out as I want to get.

    Usually this is ash and pine. Ash is a piece of cake and really fun to split. Pine has become my nemesis - it's "easy" to split in theory. But branches go through it every which way, it's knotty as hell, it's sap filled, and it's actually a very heavy wood when newly split due to all that sap/water. It's also soft, which means you'll often find places where the force of the axe is blunted by the the ability of the wood to absorb a good swing.

    However, ash and pine together make a really nice burning combo. Ash is almost never hard to burn, coals nicely, and burns evenly. Pine always burns easily and always keeps the firebox hot and clean (in that it burns very cleanly and hot and rarely smolders).
     
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  21. lukem

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    I do pretty much the same thing. Cut and haul, dump in a pile on day 1, and split and split and stack over the course of several days. I like to be able to go out and split and stack a few hours at a time in the evenings. I'm not worried about extra drying time since I already have 15 or so cord split and stacked. Also, if I'm in scrounge mode it is usually a grab and go operation and I want to get it hauled home as fast as possible. I also find I can haul more if left in the round...I can get a half cord on the f 1 fitty...it overloaded but safely driveable for short distances on secondary roads at low speed.
     
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  22. nate379

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    I can do around 2, but I'm talking a full day of work, 14-16hrs.

    Also it's one cord, two cordS... CORDS... CORDS... not two "cord"
     
  23. lukem

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    Nah...it's like deer. One deer, two deer, three deer. At least with me it is...
     
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  24. iskiatomic

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    I'm in for the box of beer, I'm six feet tall, that is plenty high for my stacks, and that's about there height.


    KC
     
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  25. Danno77

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    I have no real idea. I have firewood ADHD, so I can't do anythinging all day long.

    I'll do some sawing, then wanna play with the old chainsaws, so they might take some fiddling,

    then I see the weedwacker sitting over in the corner all lonely, so I get it out, then I start trimming the yard,

    then I wanna trim around the woostacks, and I see some rounds from last week and stack a few of them on the cord rack,

    but then I decide I wanna see how easy the walnut will split in comparison to the white oak,

    then I decide I wanna see if the fiskars will work better than the 8lb maul on the easy splitting stuff,

    then I have to stack the splits, but it would probably be easier to carry a load in the yard cart, so I get the Deere hooked up

    and then figure that while I have the cart hooked on I should real quick run to my neighbors cause he says he has some extra sand I can use to pave my walkway

    then I decide to do a row of pavers real quick,

    Then I decide I had better get back to cutting the wood, but I have no idea where I set the stupid chainsaw, so I spend half an hour looking for it.

    Then I run outta bar and chain oil, so I have to run to the store for some

    But while at the store I pick up a new blade for the push mower, so when I get home I need to put it on.

    Then I realize that the bolt for the blade is exactly 3/4" and I can't find that socket. I could use an adjustable wrench, but this missing socket will drive me nuts.

    I think it's inside in the basement, so I go down there looking for it, and see a half finished wooden storm window that I've been working on building for about three years.

    Then Mrs. Danno tells me it's time for supper, so I need to get cleaned up.

    Then I eat supper

    Then I decide that i'm already cleaned up and need to help with kids' baths in about an hour, so I might as well call it a day.

    (All of that is only if I don't decide to sit inside and surf hearth.com for the day)
     
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