1. Welcome Hearth.com Guests and Visitors - Please enjoy our forums!
    Hearth.com GOLD Sponsors who help bring the site content to you:
    Hearthstone Soapstone and Cast-Iron stoves( Wood, Gas or Pellet Stoves and Inserts)

How old where you when you learned to use a chain saw

Post in 'The Gear' started by xman23, May 2, 2013.

  1. Delta-T

    Delta-T Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2008
    Messages:
    3,123
    Loc:
    NH
    at 36 I figure I'm almost mature enough to learn to run a chainsaw....I have never liked "age" as a useful category....some people have their stuff together sooned than others, some later. Ever notice the number of "adults" in those "hold ma beer and watch this" videos? nuff said i thinks.

    Helpful Sponsor Ads!





  2. Danno77

    Danno77 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2008
    Messages:
    5,007
    Loc:
    Hamilton, IL
    I star in those videos.
    Delta-T likes this.
  3. Delta-T

    Delta-T Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2008
    Messages:
    3,123
    Loc:
    NH
    ...and you're good...real good.
  4. MrWhoopee

    MrWhoopee Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2011
    Messages:
    567
    Loc:
    Shingletown, Northern California (elev. 4000 ft.)
    57, Poulan Pro 18 in. electric
  5. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2006
    Messages:
    15,256
    Loc:
    Northern IL
    I have no input on the age thing, that is a kid to kid decision IMHO...but no matter the age, get that young lad strapped into the proper PPE. Teach the safety side early and often.
    Thistle and NH_Wood like this.
  6. nate379

    nate379 Guest

    Me too but I'm able to still hold my beer!

  7. nate379

    nate379 Guest

    That is something I didn't learn till a later age. A few times Dad had us use earplugs around the chainsaw, but he didn't enforce it much and at the time I thought it was silly. I still have pretty decent hearing, unlike my Dad (every time I call my Mom has to yell for him to turn the TV down!).

  8. tekguy

    tekguy Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2009
    Messages:
    335
    Loc:
    west mass
    brand spanking new mcculloch eager beaver as wee kid.. that should date it a little
  9. Scols

    Scols Burning Hunk

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2012
    Messages:
    242
    Loc:
    Springs New York
    Late 20's fot the chainsaw,but only because that was the first time I needed one. I was taking the boat out by myself and go clamming and fishing when I was 11 and I could drive when I was 12. My parents let me start working on fishing boats which involves using hydraulics and electronics when I was 14. But every kid is different, since your grandson can handle a maul hes probably ready for the saw.
  10. Danno77

    Danno77 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2008
    Messages:
    5,007
    Loc:
    Hamilton, IL
    BTW, i used a saw before I found this site, but I was doing it all wrong. this forum has probably saved my life on more than one occasion.
  11. lukem

    lukem Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2010
    Messages:
    3,687
    Loc:
    Indiana
    Times are a lot different now than they used to be too, and it didn't take long for things to change. I'm 32...20 years ago when I was 12 I can remember hauling grain from the fields a couple miles down the backroads on a straight truck loaded with 20K + lbs of corn...sometimes driving the semi with 40K+. If I got busted back then the local cops would have told me to go home and had an adult conversation with the farmer I worked for. Now it would be all over the evening news and the farmer would probably get locked up and bankrupted.

    I don't know how that applies to chainsaws, if at all, but the point I'm trying to make is society is a lot less forgiving with minors doing "adult" jobs.
    Thistle and MasterMech like this.
  12. briansol

    briansol Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2009
    Messages:
    1,906
    Loc:
    central ct
    I think he's old enough. Just start him on some branches, not the trunk. work him up to thicker content that actually requires thought into getting the blade stuck/etc.
  13. MasterMech

    MasterMech Guest

    I'd be careful having him limb branches. They can be even more dangerous than the trunk. Straight cuts through trunk or heavy branches that have no chance of pinching the bar will be best to start. Teach him what the bucking spikes are for and to never use the nose of the bar (that'll come much later) to cut small branches. Teach that it's OK to use the top of the bar (after he has mastered the top-down cuts) and what to expect in reactionary forces. Make sure he understands when it is appropriate to do so.

    Perhaps most importantly, drive into him that if something isn't performing well, STOP, do not force the saw through the cut.
    jackatc1, Danno77 and Thistle like this.
  14. Piston

    Piston Member

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2008
    Messages:
    70
    Loc:
    Upton, MA
    My opinion on the first question is that I don't personally think its a crazy idea, but I'd check with his parents first and go with their opinion. I'm assuming your not acting as parent which I know is entirely possible :)

    To answer the second question, I was about 28 when I actually learned the correct ways to operate a chainsaw, fell a tree, correctly cut, and do it not only safely but more efficiently. However, my father "taught" me how to run a chainsaw at 14. He is 59 now and still hasn't actually learned how to run a chainsaw. All I can say is he is one lucky man!
  15. lukem

    lukem Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2010
    Messages:
    3,687
    Loc:
    Indiana
    Agree. Much more room for things to go wrong limbing (tripping especially). By comparison, not a lot can go wrong bucking a big old trunk.

    And show him what kickback looks like....rev it up and touch the top of the bar nose on something. Better for him to see it happen and know what it looks like ahead of it actually happening.
  16. Flatbedford

    Flatbedford Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2009
    Messages:
    5,235
    Loc:
    Croton-on-Hudson, suburbs of NYC
    It should be a kid by kid basis. I agree that some adults shouldn't be allowed to operate power tools, machinery, or even automobiles.

    I was driving garden tractors at around 10 or 11 and smaller farm tractors at around 16. I learned how to drive when my sister turned 16 and I was 13. I sailed the family's small sailboat, and trailered it home with a couple friends when I was 17. The first time I used a chainsaw I was 18. I borrowed it and figured it out myself based on what I had seen others do with one over the years. About a year later, my father and I bought a crappy Homelite saw at Sears. I read the book cover to cover before I used it. Most of my chainsaw knowledge came from that Homlite manual. We upgraded to a Stihl 029 a few years after that and it had an even better manual. I bought some PPE out of the Northern Hydraulics catalog because I thought it looked cool when we bought the 029. I didn't get real serious about using the saw until I got serious about burning wood and reading about it on the net about 6 or 7 years ago. Now that I have read a lot about technique and safety, I'm better and safer, but those manuals sure did give a very good foundation of knowledge.
  17. briansol

    briansol Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2009
    Messages:
    1,906
    Loc:
    central ct
    I was suggesting limbs from an already downed tree.... not a standing one. sorry if that wasn't clear.
  18. Danno77

    Danno77 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2008
    Messages:
    5,007
    Loc:
    Hamilton, IL
    even then, the bigger the better. Think of the moving target effect that you get with smaller limbs, the saw drags them all around, they pinch down on the saw after a second of cutting.

    Best to learn on really big stable logs laying on the ground. you throttle up and get into the wood and just get a feel for the power of the saw and the tug of the cutters. Too much rev-up, cut from above, then cut from below, apply break, move, drag debris away, etc when it's limbs on the ground. Just my 2cents.
  19. lukem

    lukem Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2010
    Messages:
    3,687
    Loc:
    Indiana
    I was too.

Share This Page