how should i stack my wood?

iamquaker Posted By iamquaker, Jun 4, 2009 at 2:19 AM

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  1. iamquaker

    iamquaker
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    so i finally got my fence done and made myself a nice 25' x 28' "white trash" corner of my house for stacking my wood, parking my trailer and splitter and anything else i drag home that the wife hates me to pile around the house.

    the area to stack wood is 8' deep and 28' wide. i will need access to the stack with a wheel barrow to stacking and running loads to the house in the winter. so a solid 28' of wood would make it hard to get a wheel barrow past all the metal posts to hold the stack ends up.

    shoot me some ideas.

    the wood will be stacked on the right side of the gate in this photo 8 feet deep.

    [​IMG]
     
  2. SolarAndWood

    SolarAndWood
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    I'd run a few 2x4s horizontally across the 4x4s and then put up some of the metal fence from TSC or Mr Seconds or whatever is near you to protect the fence. Then, run 28' wide and not bother with the metal posts. You will want something between the grass and your stacks as well. Pallets are quick and easy short term but I like coarse gravel in the long run.
     
  3. gzecc

    gzecc
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    Look on craigslist for free pressure treated wood. It comes from old decks, wheelchair ramps etc, that come down.
     
  4. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage
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    iamquaker, you don't need those posts and your yard will look better without them after the wood has been taken from the stacks. Here is how we do it.

    [​IMG]

    You could stack it in 8' rows but you would get better air circulation using the 28' rows because the fence and garage will block all the wind from those directions.
     
  5. SlyFerret

    SlyFerret
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    To quote my father, when I asked questions like that.... "Very carefully".

    In all seriousness... I stack all my wood on pallets to keep the splits off the ground. If you can find pallets, they work great. If you stack carefully, you can stack on the pallets, and "box" the ends to keep the stacks from falling over.

    -SF
     
  6. Tfin

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    I get my pallets free from Home Depot (the ones without the yellow or blue paint on them ofcourse). My brother-in-law is an AM there and he's glad to get rid of them otherwise they have to pay to do do.

    Anyways I stack on pallets in the same manner as Backwoods. Just take your time in sizing/building the ends and you shouldn't have any issues with them toppling over. Some of my ends have been stacked in this manner for over a year and are still fine.
     
  7. LLigetfa

    LLigetfa
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    BWS makes some nice stacks but the way each row is independent of the other would topple from frost heave on my clay soil. The variation I used was to lay down a first course of long rounds (perpendicular to the ones on the ground) tight together like a corduroy road. The three rows then move as one with the frost rather than independently.

    I no longer have the patience for making cross-piled ends and prefer to use T-bars. True, they do present an obstacle when the stacks are depleted but that doesn't bother me. IMHO, cross piling ends take too long and can be precarious if stacking really green wood as it shrinks a lot.
     
  8. Bigg_Redd

    Bigg_Redd
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    Not on end. I hope this helps.
     
  9. billb3

    billb3
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    upright is for pellets
     
  10. daveswoodhauler

    daveswoodhauler
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    And here I was thinking that I was the only one that has used this method....Talking about stacking wood that is :)
    How do I know?....well last night one of the sloppy piles fell over...
     
  11. gzecc

    gzecc
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    Cut some holes in the fence to allow air flow. If you don't want to do that, take off every other slate or dig some holes under the fence at least 12" across to allow airflow.
     
  12. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage
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    To answer the guys above. If my memory is correct, I think only one or two ends have ever fell over on any of our piles and none has ever fallen sideways. At present, we have some wood that has been stacked 5 years with no sign of falling over even if we left them another 10 years. Just be careful building the ends, which takes very little time; it's almost as fast as just stacking in the rows.
     
  13. Jamess67

    Jamess67
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    how about 2 rows like this.
    [​IMG]
     
  14. daveswoodhauler

    daveswoodhauler
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    Might need the room for future wood, and keep it neat and clean for the significant other ?
     
  15. ansehnlich1

    ansehnlich1
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    Alright dude, here's my take on this stacking dilemma.

    I'd lay out pallets. Looks like you can get three, maybe four 28 foot rows in there, and I'd leave enough room to run a wheelbarrow between the fence on the right and the wood pile. That way you can stack it in there tight, air can get to either side of the stack, you can access it from either side, and it'll be easy to cover up.

    There's a Pennsylvania boys .02$
     
  16. iceman

    iceman
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    make a maze in your yard 2 pallets together and stack and then do it in different places and it would look cool!
     
  17. Northwind

    Northwind
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    Here's 6 cords...


    [​IMG]
     
  18. 11 Bravo

    11 Bravo
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    Northwind.........you're kinda sick........matching poles even :bug:
     
  19. gzecc

    gzecc
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    Northwind- Is it no wife or the best wife?
     
  20. iamquaker

    iamquaker
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    thanks for all the input on ideas guys. i am thinking something like what northwind has here, except instead of just driving the stakes into the ground. i was thinking of digging some post holes with pipe in them to insert the posts into so they are removable for wood access.

    i guess i forgot to mention part of the problem i have for stacking wood is the quantity of wood i need to stack. my wood scavenging started out this year with a buddy whos brother took down "2 trees" if you want them go on over. well those "2 trees" turned out to be about 20-25 trees! my only payment to the guy is to help him run his chipper to clean up the branches. and now that we have gotten about half down with these trees he is already talking about taking down more trees! i will end up with easily over 10 cords of wood.

    so i am thinking i will need to make rows 8' deep all the way across the 28' foot wide section and still not sure i will have enough room! :)

    what a hassle free wood is!!!!!!!!!!!!!
     
  21. LLigetfa

    LLigetfa
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    Those T-bar post pull up easily. Just put a big pipe wrench on it near the base and pry them out with a long bar or farmer's jack. You won't be pulling up anything in the Winter when it's frozen into the ground.

    I cram 12 cord into a 10x20 woodshed by stacking 9 feet high with no spaces. Mind you for stacks that high, you really need a good concrete slab.
     
  22. deck2

    deck2
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    I used the T-Bars for the first time this spring and they seem to work OK (don't buy the cheap ones spend a few extra bucks and buy the heavy ones-- don't ask how I know!), But I found that everytime I stack over 4ft high my stacks start to lean and eventually fall over, the t-bars help me to control the heigh of the stacks also I know when I get to the height of the bar all the way across I am done with the. I also started stacking on some course crushed stone, way easier than screwing around with pallets and I don't have to pick up the stone in the spring.
     
  23. Northwind

    Northwind
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    Stack it neat and your wife just might say, "wow, that looks nice". Like they said, the end posts pull up easily. I also run 14 or 16 ga wire between the end posts to keep them from pushing out. The wire doesn't show up in the pic.
     
  24. fishinpa

    fishinpa
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    When I first saw the title to this post my initial response, being he pig I am was to say "any way she wants you to", but I won't go there on this one. That's what my buddy calls it... stacking wood..... (yeah, I'm 15 mentally, sometimes)

    The two above responses are more my reality. I have decided though... due to the same row (times 3 rows deep) going over 3 times, that once split, I won't stack it for 2 to 3 weeks, due to what I feel may be 'initial rapid evaporation', or "initial shrinkage' for lack of a better phrase.
     
  25. Tfin

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    Then you could have a paintball course as well!
     
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