1. Welcome Hearth.com Guests and Visitors - Please enjoy our forums!
    Hearth.com GOLD Sponsors who help bring the site content to you:
    Hearthstone Soapstone and Cast-Iron stoves( Wood, Gas or Pellet Stoves and Inserts)
    Caluwe - Passion for Fire and Water ( Pellet and Wood Hydronic and Space Heating)

How "substantial" are good chainsaw gloves?

Post in 'The Gear' started by Gooserider, May 11, 2007.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Gooserider

    Gooserider Mod Emeritus

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2006
    Messages:
    6,737
    Loc:
    Northeastern MA (near Lowell)
    The topic has come up here http://www.hearth.com/econtent/index.php/forums/viewthread/7688/P15/ and was a bit of a thread hijack, so I thought I'd start a new thread...

    A couple of us, including me, have purchased new Husqvarna "chainsaw gloves" - Husky P/N 505-64-22-10 These are listed on the Husky website (go to "protective clothing", "gloves") as "chainsaw gloves" containing "chainsaw protective material" of undefined sort. No certifications are listed, and nothing appears on the gloves. When I wrote to Husky, (see earlier thread) they said everything they sold was ANSI certified, but I'm not all that reassured.... (My other PPE specifies an ASTM certification - is this the same as ANSI?) They sell several other models of gloves that are clearly NOT marked as "chainsaw" gloves, and appeared to just be standard work gloves with a Husky logo on them.

    My boots and chaps have really serious levels of padding in them, you can feel and see it (not to mention sweat in it... 8-/ ) However these gloves only claim to have padding in the left hand, and you can barely detect it when comparing the two gloves, they really feel "skimpy" compared to either a pair of welding gloves, or even my SUMMER weight motorcycle riding gloves (let alone the winter gloves which have padding that feels more like my Stihl chainsaw chaps...) They have about the same "look and feel" as a cheapy pair of cotton back leather work gloves, except that the back is dayglow orange. However they certainly COST a heck of a lot more, I got them on sale for $21 at my local hardware store, list is $26, a price which seems about in line with the web stores when one adds in shipping.

    Is this typical of chainsaw gloves? Or are these Husky gloves a bit of a "rip-off" (Unlike their pro-grade saws) and other brands offer more / better protection? My feeling is that I would like to know that the PPE that I spend extra money on is actually offering enough added protection to justify the cost. It may just be perception, and I know there is a tradeoff between protection and dexterity, but these gloves don't feel like the back would protect against a bicycle chain, let alone a real chainsaw...

    Gooserider

    Helpful Sponsor Ads!





  2. elkimmeg

    elkimmeg Guest

    Goose Can't tell you how good the gloves are I wear work gloves if only to prevent getting splinters in my hands.

    I doubt thery offer much protection for a chain. Again I can not make a value judgement concerning cost.

    Part of the judgement would be how long they hold up?
  3. zzr7ky

    zzr7ky Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2006
    Messages:
    1,043
  4. count brewski

    count brewski New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2005
    Messages:
    30
    Loc:
    Maryland
    hey zzr7ky could you please correct and repost that URL? thanks
  5. WarmGuy

    WarmGuy Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2006
    Messages:
    492
    Loc:
    Far Northern Calif. Coast
    Here's what gets me about these gloves. When I'm actually cutting, my hands don't have to do anything intricate. Left hand just has to hold the saw handle, right hand squeeze the trigger. So, at least for that part of the operation, I don't mind if the gloves are clunky. But the Husky gloves are more supple than my regular work gloves.

    True, when sawing you have to do other things like move branches, adjust choke, etc. But I'd be willing to give up some convenience (e.g. to need to remove the gloves when not actually cutting) in exchange for some extra safety.
  6. carpniels

    carpniels Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2005
    Messages:
    536
    Loc:
    Rome, NY, USA
    Hi Goose,

    I noticed the exact same thing. I actually got mine in Holland, because at that time they did not have chainsaw proof gloves in the USA, but they were on the European website. Anyway, when I got them, they felt less substantial than a $2 pair of work gloves. At 15 times the cost!!! I felt jibbed.

    So, I guess we will have to sacrifice a pair and put a hogs leg in it and cut it with a saw and see what happens. That would be fun for Utube!!!!!! Until then, just be really really careful!!!!!

    Carpniels
  7. zzr7ky

    zzr7ky Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2006
    Messages:
    1,043
    Hi -

    I have some experience in industrial settings with metal fabricating. There are also Kevlar gloves listed on the website I listed. Many of these gloves are great a preventing lacerations. However 4-6 horsepower does a lot of damage to comparitively fragile fingers and hands.

    ATB,
    Mike P
  8. Gooserider

    Gooserider Mod Emeritus

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2006
    Messages:
    6,737
    Loc:
    Northeastern MA (near Lowell)
    Elk - No telling how they'll hold up. They look well made, but the base material is still leather - it would take a heck of a lot of wear for them to outlast 2-4 other pairs of my usual work gloves that I might pay $5-10/pair for.

    zzr7ky - The link you posted didn't work. Peeling it back to a minimum URL got me to Magid, but they have several pairs of cut-resistant gloves, but none are described as "chainsaw gloves", and I can't tell which ones you were pointing at that your roofer friends liked.

    WarmGuy - These gloves are clunkier than the usual "technical" gloves I wear, but I wold agree they seem more flexible than the usual "generic leather work glove" design they are based on... I just wonder how they compare to other gloves like these from Forestry Suppliers or these from England

    It actually sounds like the Europeans may have slightly more sophisticated standards than the US does based on this Wikipedia article. Now I did find a link to Amick's Superstore that says the gloves meet CE (European Union) requirements, but the gloves don't have the "chainsaw logo" that the Wikipedia article says that the CE requires. However in the fine print on the little materials tag, the last line does say "CE CAT-1". According to the English site I linked to above, and the Wikipedia article, Class 1 is the better class for gloves, so these may be OK...

    Any comments from the pros that whack on trees for a living :question:

    Gooserider
  9. zzr7ky

    zzr7ky Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2006
    Messages:
    1,043
    Hi again -

    Use the http://www.magidglove.com Search on GP150 or JDW150

    ROC Size 10 (I’m 5’10")

    I got a dozen to try and gave 6 par away. The others haven't worn much at all in a year, including all splitting and some brick and block work. My buddies are now wanting to know where to get them. I like them for stretching fence also.

    ATB,
    Mike P
  10. Gooserider

    Gooserider Mod Emeritus

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2006
    Messages:
    6,737
    Loc:
    Northeastern MA (near Lowell)
    They look similar to the gloves I've been getting at the hardware store with a nylon back and rubberized fingers and palms. Magid looks cheaper assuming you need a dozen (Do they sell to non-commercial accounts in less than case lots? how is their shipping and handling?) I don't know how their quality is, but I'd expect it was OK.

    I agree that style seems pretty durable, at least I haven't blown mine out yet. However I don't think they are suitable for wood splitting when using a maul - they might be fine with a power splitter. The reason is that part of my swinging technique is to slide my left hand along the handle of the sledge or maul as I come down with it. I find the rubber glove surface has to much friction and won't slide smoothly or freely, so it tears up my hand and screws up my aim.

    So now I use the rubber and cloth gloves for a lot of stuff, including stacking and moving wood, but for splitting I have some gloves with a leather or synthetic leather (I forget which) palm that slides better and has some of that "gel padding" stuff in them which helps a little with soaking up the hammer impacts. I was using those for the chainsaw as well, but will now be using the Husky chainsaw gloves for whatever protection they give.

    Gooserider
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page