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HS TARM BOILER INFO

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by bigdummy, Sep 8, 2006.

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  1. bigdummy

    bigdummy New Member

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    Sep 8, 2006
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    Hello:

    I own an HS TARM model 502 multifuel boiler. When I originally purchased the boiler about 15 years ago, the company made a conversion kit that could be installed with the boiler to use electricity as an independent or supplemental fuel source. I did not purchase this kit at the time.

    My wife has recently developed severe knee and arthritis problems so that the dampness at night or when it rains causes her a lot of pain.

    The US distributor of TARM products has told me that they can no longer get these electrical conversion kits and the company headquarters in Germany has not responded to my email.

    I am wondering if anyone out there has one of these kits or could send me a list of the required parts and the electrical specifications so that I could obtain the necessary parts from local suppliers.

    Thank you. bigdummy

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  2. webbie

    webbie Seasoned Moderator Staff Member

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    Western Mass.
    First of all, why do you want to convert to electric instead of using oil or gas which are usually much cheaper.

    Now, onto the electric.

    There are standard tappings for screw in elements in the side of the boiler - 6 of them can go in there. The electric panel was made here in the USA and had the real function of it was to sequence the elements so they turned on 2 at a time because all 6 of them would dim the lights in the neighborhood.

    In most cases, 4 elements about be enough to do the job and a qualified electrician and plumber could surely make up the controls and box for you. If I am not wrong, the elements would be heavy duty (sandhog?) 4500 watts - which means each element would provide approx 16,000 BTU - 4 of them is 64,000 which would heat most any home - in fact, 2 of them would go a long way in most homes considering full time use - but get ready for some massive electric bills.
  3. bigdummy

    bigdummy New Member

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    Hello Mr. Issod:

    I apologize for not stating my intent more clearly.

    I do not want to use the electrical option on a full time basis. I very much prefer using wood and coal during the regular heating season. The electrical option would only be used occasionally during the off season when the dampness in the house is bothering my wife's arthritis and knees and causing her a lot of pain. The cost factors of installing tanks, piping, etc for oil or gas seem to offset the savings I would get from using them in this manner. Also the bother of starting a wood or coal fire in the boiler for only a day or so, or possible just overnight, comes into play here. With the electrical option, I believe that I could simply turn on the system at night and shut it off the next day, circumstances permitting.

    I have talked to local plumbing and heating people and their first comment was to ask if I could get the original parts list and electrical specifications. It may have something to do with liability if something should not work properly. If I can not get this list and specifications, they will probably do exactly what you have said in your post.

    Thank you for your reply. bigdummy
  4. webbie

    webbie Seasoned Moderator Staff Member

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    Loc:
    Western Mass.
    The original was never made or approved by the factory - it was simply sub-contracted over here by the importing company. They have not produced any since 1990 or before since they were very slow sellers.

    For your off-season use, just two of the elements may do - in which case you would not have to sequence them. You could even install two banks of two and simply keep one set off most of the time - but 30,000 BTU should heat just about any house in the shoulder seasons. Good Luck.
  5. jbellies

    jbellies New Member

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    Have you considered a dehumidifier? Here in the PNW (Coastal British Columbia actually) we have been pleased with a dehumidifier removing extra moisture in the winter. As an added bonus, the dehumidifier produces heat, so in some respect it can be considered a more than 100% efficient electric heater. We could not use the cheaper dehumidifiers that are targeted for summer use, we needed to get one where the evaporator coils could not freeze up. The unit we bought was a Fedders A7DH..... and on the box it says it is good down to 45F. I already can't remember the price, but it was less than $cdn 400.

    Cons: it isn't quiet. It's not "central", it gets moved around from room to room.

    The solution you envision heats the damp air, thus lowering the relative humidity. A dehumidifier actually removes moisture from the air, and when the air cools down again, you are ahead of where you might have been if you had simply heated the air in the first place.
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