Huge house needs some heat!

sykesman Posted By sykesman, Feb 18, 2014 at 8:31 AM

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  1. sykesman

    sykesman
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    Dec 13, 2010
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    Hi, thanks in advance for advice.

    I have a large house, high ceilings with a very good hearth, 8" x 22' insulated lined flue in chimney.

    I burn oak and other hardwoods. Since I cut, split stack haul, it's a challenge to always have it dry enough...

    I've been struggling to heat with the existing CDW 2462, catalytic, but it's not cutting it.

    I just observed a Fisher Grampa that threw a lot of heat, yet I see by several posts on hearth that these stoves are not as efficient as modern designs.

    Can I get some advice recommending stove models that might throw enough heat without requiring a second mortgage?

    Really appreciate this site and your advice.
     
  2. maple1

    maple1
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    Is the stove your only source of heat?
     
  3. sykesman

    sykesman
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    I also have a gas furnace, forced air, thank you for your interest!
     
  4. coaly

    coaly
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    They may not be as efficient as the secondary burn in modern design, but you don't have the optimum fuel or correct chimney for a newer stove either. For a more efficient Fisher than Grandpa (Papa) you would need a 6 inch liner for efficiency as well. Notice the efficiency starts with the chimney.........
    For your fuel and chimney, put a baffle in a Grandpa or XL depending on how "huge" (3000 square feet) and feed it a little more wood. You'll be warm.
     
  5. maple1

    maple1
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    A stove is a space heater and they can only do so much.

    You didn't say how big your house is (or much else about it) - just that it's big. So far to me it sounds like a situation for a central heating - ie. a wood furnace you can tie into your existing ducting.
     
  6. gzecc

    gzecc
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    What kind of wood do you have? How long has it been split and stacked?
     
  7. sykesman

    sykesman
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    Last years storms gave me quite a lot of oak but its not ready, I'm trying to get 2 or optimally 3 years ahead. I'm sure part of my problem is greenish wood.

    Even with a load of good wood, the CDW 2462 doesn't get very hot.

    Thanks for your interest!
     
  8. sykesman

    sykesman
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    That's right, could be done, I'll look at some you tubes, any suggestions? What is your experience with you Varmbaronen?
     
  9. sykesman

    sykesman
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    Thanks for the tips, would you explain the baffle idea? I keep coming back to the CDW 2462, replaced the cat, it has a 8" flue but never gets as hot as the Grampa, maybe I need to get another year ahead on my wood pile! It's a year round job...
     
  10. Ram 1500 with an axe...

    Ram 1500 with an axe...
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    Big house plus cold weather will beat out a wood stove and greenish wood every time.....
    The way my house is laid out, I would need 1 more insert and a free standing stove to keep it completely warm.... And I only have 3 bedrooms, nothing special.....
     
  11. maple1

    maple1
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    Excellent - but it's a boiler not a furnace.

    You might want to spend some time browsing the Boiler Room, if you haven't already - if the idea of central heating appeals to you.
     
  12. valley ranch

    valley ranch
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    Greetings, I'm thinking, well first, a ceiling fan, to bring the heat down, that works very well in large houses with high ceilings. Now, a good size stove, a newer one if that will do it, if not a classic, something you can build a real fire in, that has a fan of it's own or add one.

    This house isn't of grand size, 2000sq ft and a 1000sq below that, garage and such. But we like it very warm, 80 degrees, I let the fire die down, as it approaches 70 degrees, I throw in a split or two. We're in and out of the house, working, feeding, moving snow or hay.. and..We're pro skiers, if we, the family, is on the mountain all day skiing,when we come in, we build a fire and want big heat as soon as possible. This stove sitting behind me does that for us. I like a large stove, with glass door. If your wood, like ours isn't always the driest, cat stoves are not for you, but a stove with secondary air tubes could be the answer, they can be added to many of the great old stoves, have a look here on the forum, some guys have added pipes, gaining a secondary burn that would make you proud.
    We cut our wood here also. It takes, the family, three or four days to cut split and stack 4 to 5 cords, if we have time to early in the year, it's drier come winter. Keep warm.



    Today is my birthday, the girls gave me a camera, maybe now I can, when talking about something show a picture, more often than in the past.
     
  13. sykesman

    sykesman
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    Thanks for the insightful note, and Happy Birthday with many more. I'll check out the air tubes and fan suggestions. I was really impressed with the Grampa bear!

    I keep a large part of the house closed off, but the living space has 8' ceilings, upstairs and down.

    I wish snow upon you there in the Sierra!
     
  14. coaly

    coaly
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    http://www.hearth.com/talk/threads/simple-baffle-solution-for-your-old-fisher-more-heat-less-smoke-under-25.74710/

    Post #28 includes video here;
    http://www.hearth.com/talk/threads/cant-seem-to-figure-out.119184/page-2#post-1617042
     
  15. sykesman

    sykesman
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  16. Frank625

    Frank625
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    See if you can find an old Ashley or Suburban Woodcheif in good shape. The cabinet style stove/heaters have thermostats controlling the air intake to help regulate the burn. You can add a blower to the cabinet or let it use natural convection. I found one on craigslist for $100 that just needed to be cleaned out. If the firebrick is in good shape and the grate is in good shape your are in business. They have big fire boxes and can burn all night or all day if you have to go to work. They have a separate ash pan door below to empty the ashes allowing you to keep the stove going easily and you can keep burning for weeks without stopping. I took a grinder with a scotch brite pad to my Woodcheif and repainted it with high heat grill paint. I now looks brand new. The new stoves are nice however if you can't build up enough wood to let it season properly, you will be better off with an older stove. I'm not saying to burn real wet wood like frest cut poplar or hickory but fairly fresh cut oak is no problem. I clean my chimney once a year and the soot build up is minimal. For me it works great and does it's job. When I was growing up my Dad always had a big wood/coal stove/boiler in the basement with a big ash pan below. I wouldn't want a stove of any kind that didn't have a big ash pan that couldn't be emptied independantly and I really don't want a glass door either, but that's just my preference.
     
  17. sykesman

    sykesman
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    Thanks for the advice, I'll start looking!
     
  18. Rich L

    Rich L
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    Get some bio bricks,envi blocks, or hot bricks to mix in with your not so seasoned wood.They burn so hot that the unseasoned wood will burn well.
     
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