Humidity revisted.........

MCPO Posted By MCPO, Dec 18, 2010 at 2:38 PM

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. MCPO

    MCPO
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    May 1, 2008
    2,302
    144
    Loc:
    western Ma , close to NY state border
  2. soupy1957

    soupy1957
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Jan 8, 2010
    1,365
    28
    Loc:
    Connecticut
    Two things seem to be being addressed here, .......E.S.D. and Humidity (which go hand in hand, obviously).

    From the "E.S.D." side.......I teach a class (have taught thousands of people, literally, the basic priniciples of E.S.D. and the dangers involved) on this. If you want to reduce E.S.D., you avoid certain types of materials, and you INCREASE the humidity. In other words, there's a fine balance between having ENOUGH humidity and have too MUCH humidity.

    E.S.D. is only a hassle in the home, from the point of view of getting "zapped' all the time. It's not a danger necessarily to you at 2,000 D.C. Volts (the level at which you can see, hear and feel an E.S.D. charge).

    Any tool that helps to balance out the humidity in a home, is an added plus, regardless of manufacturer.

    -Soupy1957
     
  3. save$

    save$
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Sep 22, 2008
    1,904
    365
    Loc:
    Chelsea Maine
    Thanks for the charts. Nice to have objective data available when you are trying to discuss this issue. There are far too many people that just blow off the concept of needing OAK and maintaining home humidity levels. Worse yet, so many dealers and installer never bring either issue up when discussing a new stove purchase or install. Look at the brochures that are put out by the manufacturers. Rare to see anything in those. OAK is usually mentioned in the installation manual, but the subject of humidity seems to be left out all together.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page