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Husqvarna 350 problems

Post in 'The Gear' started by Wayne214, Aug 7, 2006.

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  1. Wayne214

    Wayne214 New Member

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    Hi all,

    This is my 1st post here and am new to chainsaws. My wife was doing research for me and read great reviews on the Husqvarna 350 so we bought one at a licensed dealer (not Lowes). The salesman showed me how to start it up because I heard they were tricky to start. I made the fuel/oil mix (2.5 oz per 1 gallon of gas). Added the chain oil and I was ready to rock. The chain oil and fuel oil was Husqvarna brand just to be safe if the quality of other stuff wasn't as good.
    My cousin already had oak trees cut down and cut into 16" to 22" lengths. The diameter went from 8" up to almost 36". So I decided to cut the 16" diameter by 20" lengths logs first and cut them in quarters from top to bottom. I did 3 of these size logs. On the 4th log and halfway down, the chainsaw started to slow down until it completely stopped. The motor seized. I brought it back to the dealer after about 15 mintues of usage. They said there was a defective part and it shouldn't happen again. No charge. Cool.
    3 weeks later I started cutting the same size pieces again and managed to cut 2 logs into quarters. I put the chainsaw down for a few seconds while idling to move the wood. Before I picked it up, it stalled. I knew it was bad news again when it does that. That happened just before it seized up the first time. Yes, there was gas with the proper mixture and plenty of chain oil. This time I was able to pull the cord to try to get it going. The time it seized, the cord would not budge.
    Now I can't get it started even after letting it sit overnight in case I flooded it. There is plenty of spark coming from the spark plug. I primed it a few times and still no go. When cutting, I use full speed and hardly put any pressure on it while cutting. I let the chain do all the work.
    I've read these chainsaws can work for hours with very little break in between cutting. One thing I did notice is that underneath the plastic cover below your left hand, it gets really hot. Is that normal for it to get that hot?
    Why am I having trouble with this chainsaw? I've used this chainsaw for a total of 25 minutes and 2 major problems already. Am I doing anything wrong the 2nd time? Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.

    Wayne

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  2. MountainStoveGuy

    MountainStoveGuy Minister of Fire

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    trade it in for a XP series ;)
    Im kidding of course, but it doesnt sound normal, you have had two saws now, i cant imagine that you would get to defective saws, but i guess its possible. Saws overheat, If your working the saw to hard it could overheat. I had the 350, and it was not what i was looking for. I took it back and purchased 372 xp, you might not need one THAT big, but thats what i bought. It starts with a few pulls, and it has as much horsepower as a go cart. it has dont exactly what i expect it to do. This is not to dismiss that your having problems with your 350, but its like lottery odds that you have gotten two defective ones. Call your dealer, i would love to know what he has to say.
  3. MountainStoveGuy

    MountainStoveGuy Minister of Fire

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    isnt a 40.1 ratio 3.2 oz per gallon?
  4. elkimmeg

    elkimmeg Guest

    Lets see what is happening. Try your normal starting proceedure take the plug out see is the end wet with gas or dry dose it looks clean? While the plug is out pull the cord a few times this will clear out any flooding. insert the plug and wire and ground it to bear
    metal do you see a spark? Install the plug if you see a spark with a cap full of gas oe so pour it in the carb and pull the starter a few times did it cough remember switch between choke and no choke. Has condensation or water gotten into the gas? was it new gas ?
    If there is no cough or sign of firing take it back to the dealer. ASk for a new saw either equilvent Stihl or dolmar sack/ makita. Or your money back If you are having this much problems and the dealer has already replaced defective parts you may have a lemon.
    Hell I have fewer problems with my 1968 Mac 10/10 or any of my mid 80's poulans/ craftsmen saws or my 1978 Stihl farm boss
  5. suematteva

    suematteva New Member

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    Wayne,

    Welcome to the forum.

    Oak Logs 16" diameter and they are about 20" long? And you are cutting them lengthwise to split them? Am I reading your post right?
  6. Roospike

    Roospike New Member

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    Yep . 40:1 is 3.2oz oil per gallon , 50:1 is 2.6oz oil per gallon . The new Stihl and Husqvarnas are stated to be run at 50:1 as I'm sure the EPA has there hand in it . I always run 40:1 . I would take the saw back to the dealer or at least give them a call first . Something dont sound right .
  7. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    All saws get really hot working them hard and splitting rounds lengthwise is working them hard. That said if you have a proper fuel mixture those saws should be able to work hard for a long, long time.

    Take it back. Get your money back and don't take you ain't doing it right for an answer. And then come back here for good advise on using a saw.

    And quit splitting wood with a chainsaw.
  8. MountainStoveGuy

    MountainStoveGuy Minister of Fire

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    Learned somthing new today, didnt know that new saws want 50.1 I completly agree, and im not implying that its something that your doing, but saws just dont seize up. Any saw, paulon, stihl, craftsman, etc. If im not mistaken, friction causes seize up's. So what could be causing your second saw to seize up like your first? Doesnt make any sense. This is not a husky vs stihl issue, this is something else. So clairfy something for us, is this your second saw or the first saw that has been repaired, and are you ripping logs with your saw or just making crosscuts?
  9. Wayne214

    Wayne214 New Member

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    Hi guys,

    To answer your questions...

    1. This is the first saw that has been repaired. Repair bill states, cylinder, insulation wall assembly, couple of gaskets and spark plug. And then they wrote, "Leaking intake boot - seized"

    2. The gas was a month old (87 octane) sitting in a plastic gas container in the basement tightly sealed with the 50:1 ratio mixture.

    3. I was cutting the logs (16" dia. x 20" long) cutting downward 20". I had them standing upright. I was cross cutting.

    4. After it stalled the 2nd time after getting it back from the repair shop, I couldn't get it to cough. I primed it, tried to start it, no cough. I let it sit for 1/2 hour before trying again and still no cough.

    5. I took the spark plug out, put the plug back on, pulled the cord and saw a spark but I didn't try putting a small amount of fuel in the cylinder yet to see if I can get it to cough. I'll do that after work.

    Why shouldn't I cross cut? Is it too much work for this type of chainsaw? If I shouldn't, then I won't but I still need to split these logs in half just so I can get the halves onto the log splitter that I have. I have a DR 4 ton electric splitter. I tried splitting a whole log (16" dia. x 18" long) on the log splitter and it just doesn't have the power to do it. I have some very large logs that I need to chip away at with the chainsaw even if it means just making little pieces.
    If I can't get it to cough, then I will take it back and exchange it for something equal or heavier duty.
    Thanks all. I'll let you know what the dealer says. I hope I answered everyone.
  10. Roospike

    Roospike New Member

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    Yes , I would take it back . No , I would not cut long ways with this chainsaw . No , I would not tell the dealer your are cutting logs long ways . The dealer might just tell you that this chainsaw is not made for milling and end up giving you the run-around. Your chainsaw should not of shot craps like it did so soon even if it was over worked ,eventho..... a good rule of thumb for a NEW chainsaw is to break it in the first 10 tanks of fuel before going hog wild. Not to say that you should babysit your new saw , just be kind to it the first 10 tanks of fuel. In the overall long run "I" would upgade the splitter to a larger size. "The right (size) tool for the right job" Also .........Welcome to the forum. Good luck .
  11. suematteva

    suematteva New Member

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    Cutting with this saw lengthwise is putting a big load on the saw..most milling saws are minimum 80ccs and have special chains and some run dual power heads...the saw probably has 16 or 18 inch bar and your into 16" diameter wood..this chain is designed for cross cutting...look at the difference in your sawdust...small chips vs...spaghetti....Lots of spaghetti in the lengthwise cut could also contribute to the heat buildup especially if it gets packed in around the sprocket.....I don't think the saw should have crapped out if everything on the mixes is correct...The occassional lengthwise cuts should not be a problem..I would request a new saw not a rebuild/reman....If you are going to be cutting alot of wood you may want to look at xp line as MSG suggested.

    Look into renting a splitter for the day or half a day around here you can get one for $ 50 a day..
  12. elkimmeg

    elkimmeg Guest

    This is not a normal repair for a new saw A couple of hours work and they replaced the sparkplug Cylinder walls ;eaking intake boot?

    Sounds to me this is an extensive repair. Even the best products,, some lemons slip by QC,

    That saw model saw is plenty strong enough for normal cutting. If you are going to do ripping then you need a 10 degree ripping chain.

    I suggest you refrain from trying to rip rounds Get some splitting wedges and a decent maul

    And btw can you tell the members how your DR splitter works. I have done a review of the 4 ton ryobi and 6 ton and 12 ton electric splitters.

    Welcome aboard Did enough members tell you to either get your money back or demand a replacement
  13. Sandor

    Sandor Minister of Fire

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    I have been running 50:1 in racing two strokes for 25 years, without a single siezure. Synthetic oils have the shear strength to work at that mixture. I would not try it with the $1.50/quart TCW3 two stroke oil.

    High rev two strokes cannot tolerate a lean mixture. Combustion tempuratures are too high, which actually causes the siezure. The leaking air intake boot caused the failure, just like what happened to my old Poulan.

    When a manufacturer suggest mixing at 50:1, the saw has been jetted to operate with that mixture.

    When you mix at 40:1, the saw will run LEANER, not richer, due to the viscosity change of the mix not pulling through the tiny jet.

    As a reputable two stroke engine builder told me: I have never seen an engine blow up due to lubrication failure, but I have seen plenty blow up from a lean condition.

    And Wayne, check the compression on your saw. You may not have enough to support combustion.
  14. wg_bent

    wg_bent Minister of Fire

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    To put power in perspective, I have the Lowest power saw in the Husky line. the 136. I run 50:1 synthetic, and I've probably cut 25 cords with it in it's life. I've run it for 3 hours straight cutting dead elm and it's just keeps cutting. That 350 should blow the doors off my 136. Since you've got the Husky oil and the right mixture, you should have NO problems. Take it back.

    Personally if I had that much trouble I'd get a different saw. Like a Stihl.
  15. Roospike

    Roospike New Member

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    Here is one way to look at it . When the chainsaw had the problem the first time the options for the dealer were . #1 replace your chainsaw with a new saw and send the first one back to Husqvarna . or #2 Take your chainsaw and do repair work in there shop and charge Husqvarna for the work . The dealer is going to be making more money one way then the other . I would get a new / different 350 chainsaw . the dealer might like to fix your saw , fix it agian , fix it once more , fix it another time ...........
  16. drizler

    drizler Minister of Fire

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    Do the dealerthing and don't wait. You never know what it it and it can get confusing so if you can blow it off on them why not. My Husky 141 seized a few years back, took it in just under warranty ( for once in my life). Dealer said the engine seized and blew up due to carb nut getting ingested. Now how the hell can a carb mount nut get sucked in without someone chucking it in there you ask? So did I. He called Husky and they said "oh yea we have had that happen on more than a few occasions" At any rate they gave me a new saw. One of the new auto choke dumping rigs that starts like chit even in the summer till I removes that auto choke dumper. Even when I had taken the carb off the new saw to remove the offending junk I still can't figure how a carb mount nut can get into the saw with the air cleaner on?
  17. Randy S

    Randy S New Member

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    Hi Wayne,

    Sorry to hear you have had trouble. This is the same saw that I bought. I started using it 2 weeks ago for about 1- 1 1/2 hrs. cutting down small trees/bushes. Two days ago on Saturday the 19th, we worked it for 4 hours, cutting it off a couple, three times an hour to adjust wood/rest. We were cutting red and white oak in 12-18 inch diameter rounds and it did fine. I have really enjoyed working this saw, there is no vibration in the handle at all. My brother cut for the last two hours(all he has worked with in the past was Stihl) and he was really impressed with the saw. I bought mine at Northern Tool & Equipment, but will take it to a dealer closer to home who services Husqvarna. The manual that came with it(if I am reading it right) says to take it in to be serviced after 10 hours of use for the carb. to be adjusted.

    I hope you are able to get yours straightened out.

    SG
  18. Wayne214

    Wayne214 New Member

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    Thanks for your support everyone.
    I brought the chainsaw in for the 2nd time and they said it was the "leaking intake boot" again. At this point I had to laugh. the 1st time they said it was a defective part, and now I'm beginning to think it's operator error. I guess I shouldn't have been cross cutting on big pieces. A neighbor said cross cutting are bad for chainsaws just like everyone said on this board says. I wasn't doing the "see-saw" style of cutting, I was going level with the log. If it was a different part that broke, then I would try and get my money back or ask them to give me a new one. One of the salesman said that they have to ask Husqvarna for authorization to give me a new one, it wasn't their decision.
    A couple of weeks ago, another neighbor was having his tree (ash) cut down by professionals. They were using Husky 455 Ranchers. I was watching them cut pieces down, slicing across the round from a few inches up to 30" in diameter at the base. They never cross cut. They were jamming the chain, putting a lot of pressure on the motor and it kept on going. Yeah, me and the wife scrounged for a few pieces. We got about 1/2 cord of ash waiting to be cut and split. We didn't even consider taking the big pieces.
    Now that I know a little more of what not to do with a chainsaw, I'll have to use it for light use. And now that my neighbor showed me how to split large logs with a few steel wedges and a sledgehammer, me and the wife are making some decent progress and having a good time doing it. Everynight after work, she can't wait to get out and split a few.
    When I get the chainsaw back, I'll cut logs the correct way and see if it breaks down again. Not that I want to for the 3rd time. I'll be gentle. NO MORE CROSS CUTTING. I have enough to keep me busy for a couple of hours.
  19. Roospike

    Roospike New Member

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    Good to hear Wayne ........... I'm glad it all worked out for you. Its great that the wife enjoys helping with the wood , it makes it that much better for the both of you to injoy during the winter months for the fruit of your labor . "BE SAFE" and have fun . If you have any question just ask , thats what were are all about . Storys and pictures are a big + .
  20. BTOP

    BTOP New Member

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    Sounds like you need to learn a bit more than how to use a chainsaw. That saw doesn't need to be babied or restricted to "light duty" Next time that saw burps (and I am sure it will) take it back to the dealer and DEMAND your money back. Don't "ASK" don't "TRY". don't take no for an answer or that he needs authorization. Then go somewhere ELSE and buy another one. Husky's are great saws. It sounds like that dealer is the problem. He see's an inexperienced customer and $$$ signs in repairs. In reference to the first sentence of my post - there are plenty of jerks out there ready,willing and able to take advantage of you and profit off you.
    Good luck and get tuff.
  21. MountainStoveGuy

    MountainStoveGuy Minister of Fire

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    A husky 350 is ok for milling?
  22. ourhouse

    ourhouse Minister of Fire

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    Wayne I hope that saw works out great for you. I'm a Husky man myself. I have a question, are you pushing hard on the saw when you'r cutting?
  23. Wayne214

    Wayne214 New Member

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    I did at first up until the chain jammed while the motor was still running. So I stopped pushing down hard on it and let the chain do the work. I wasn't doing the "see-saw" way of cross cutting like I should have.
    After I got it back from the repair shop (1st time), I was doing more cross cutting and added very little pressure but not enough to jam the chain.
    Here's a pic of one of the logs that I was cutting. I didn't cut anything bigger. It's 14" diameter

    Attached Files:

  24. ourhouse

    ourhouse Minister of Fire

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    Wayne we run 346es and when guys musle on the saws we have seen the carb boots get damaged. The new guys seam to push on the saws too much. I have also seen them brake shock mounts on the saws. The reason they push on them so much is the saws get dull and they don't stop and sharpen them.
    Good luck with you'r new saw.

    John
  25. Turner-n-Burner

    Turner-n-Burner New Member

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    I'll add my $.02 ;)

    If that intake boot keeps leaking, it's a good bet that the mating part is misformed - you'll always have problems with that saw, and an air leak will cause your saw to run lean, fast and hot - until it seizes again. You want a new saw!

    Re- splitting with the chainsaw - you do not want to "rip" straight down the log. I do a lot of this type of cutting to make turning blanks. (Need to cut to a line rather than where ever the wood will split).

    If you do need to split with the saw, lay the log down lengthwise and wedge it with some offcuts. Then cut straight down with length of the log like you were slicing a pickle - keeping the saw mostly level. You don't cut vegetables on end do you?

    Instead of sawdust and heat, you'll get long stringy shavings as the saw "peels" away the grain of the wood. just take your time and let the saw do the work - and make sure the saw is clearing the shavings. Not only is this better for the saw than cutting endgrain, it is much, much faster.

    It will however generate mounds of stringy shavings, great if you have horses, not so great if you have municipal trash pickup. Unless I need the wood cut in just a particular way, or the round is particularly difficult to split, I'd recommend the sledge and wedge.You may find it easier to split with a wedge once you get the technique down.

    -Dan
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