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Husqvarna 445

Post in 'The Gear' started by ironman70, Jun 10, 2010.

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  1. ironman70

    ironman70 Member

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    Just wanted to comment a little on my saw. Have had it for about a year and a half now and haven't had any problems with it whatsoever. I mainly use it around my house to drop trees that were carelessly planted and to start landscaping my property the way I want it.

    Well, last Saturday a F4 tornado came through NW Ohio in Lake Township, Millbury, and Genoa. I live about two miles to the east of the devestation in Millbury and a mile to the south of the devestation in Genoa. Needless to say, I was lucky. Others...not so much.

    I took my saw down to help for a couple of days cutting wood and trying to make a dent in the countless trees that were laying about. My poor saw only could make it an hour or two at a time before i had to let it cool down. Went through numerous chains and even broke a file. Not sure how...but I did.

    Boy do I wish I had a bigger/higher quality saw to help more. Felt so helpless waiting for the saw to cool or when I couldn't sharpen my chains.

    Just my $.02...

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  2. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    Fresh chains more offten and your saw will run cooler....Practice makes perfect on chain filing.... I have ran saws where you cant touch the bar its so hot.
  3. StackedLumber

    StackedLumber New Member

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    I would counter point this a bit. I've been running my 445 w/ a 18in bar even in our super hot weather up here at the end of May, and I had the bar super hot (in 95 degree weather) and to the point I couldn't touch it, and it cut great. Yeah, it will bog down some on bigger cuts (cut some 36" beech w/ it this spring), but it's super rare that I come away thinking, "I shouldn't have cut that w/ this saw". Smokinjay couldn't be more right, you have to keep your chains sharp and keep your rakers filed down. One thing I might wonder out loud is how dirty those trees might be and if you dulled your chain quick w/ mud on the trees as you were cutting. The only other thing that might be needed is a carb adjustment on your saw. I know w/ my 445 I've had to adjust it between the outdoor temps. Cutting in January and cutting in June require two different setups and adjust. for my saw. Just my .02
  4. ironman70

    ironman70 Member

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    Smokin - Definately will be checking my chain more often. Any rules of thumb as to when to change chains?

    Stacked - You're right. All of the wood was pretty dirty. Not sure how to adjust the carb. Never even came to mind. Suggestions?
  5. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    Hand filing I would touch it up after every tank of fuel. (or until you have a good grasp on it) Oh AND KEEP THE AIR CLEAN! In the field you can just knock it on something but keep it clear of chips...........
  6. HittinSteel

    HittinSteel Minister of Fire

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    Keep an eye on the saws chip discharge. When the chips get small or turn to dust, you are no longer cutting effectively. This puts a lot more stress on the saw and is probably the reason for overheating. Keep an eye out at local dealers for 2 for 1 deals on chains. Might not be a bad idea to have a 6 or 8 new ones just in case a situation like this arises gain (hopefully not)

    Wish I was closer than 2 hours, I would have come up to help folks out.
  7. HittinSteel

    HittinSteel Minister of Fire

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    Jay, I remember telling you I had purchased some Windsor chain and you asked for my thoughts when I tried it out. Had a chance to use it on some big sugar maple last evening. Did not seem to hold its edge nearly as long as stihl chain. When these are gone, I'm gonna go back to RSC and RMC.
  8. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    I like the woodland pro from baileys price is right and holds an edge well, but you cant go worng with the stihl either....The stihl rsc for my 880 comes in at 40.00 bucks. Oh and I will stay away from the windsor!
  9. kenskip1

    kenskip1 Member

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    Ironman,
    Let me get this straight, the bar was hot or the engine was hot? If the engine was hot then I would suspect a lean mixture. If the carb has not been set from the factory then a possible lean mixture could cause a hot engine.

    Now if the bar was hot, this tells me that your oilier is not up to the challenge. Either a plugged oil hole in the bar of a pump delivery problem exists.

    Now a dull chain will cause you to put more pressure on the bar but this is not the doings of the saw and will raise the bar temperature and promote premature wear of the B/C. Are you using a quality bar and chain lubricant?

    I own the same saw and from the dealer it was set way to lean.Anyhoo, I purchased the tool and now it is most eager to attack any type of wood in front of it.

    My 445 is now my favorite saw right next to my 51. A new Husky 460 will make my collection near complete, Ken
  10. ironman70

    ironman70 Member

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    How do I adjust the carb? Both (bar and engine) were hot by the way and I am using Bar/Chain Lube from Husqvarna...
  11. StackedLumber

    StackedLumber New Member

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    I'm probably not the expert for tuning in a carb. but you have to have the tool that is for the splined screws which a dealer can order for you and then you turn the H and L jets all the way till they are seated down and then turn both back one full turn. I have a mark on my tool so I keep track of the turns that I make, because if you get lost on what turns you've made you can wreck a saw quick! From there its all done by ear and how the saw sounds and slightly turning either the H or the L jet screw or by a tach to reach roughly 12000-13000 rpm. (according to what I've read you could go a bit higher but not much) Search the website here, you should find plenty on tuning it in. Jay would probably be better at describing what you need to listen for when tuning it in by ear. Like I said there are others that perhaps could tell you this better or more clearly, but this is the process I was taught and have found to work for my saw.
  12. ironman70

    ironman70 Member

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    Ok. Thanks...
  13. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    I was thinking if he is getting 2 hrs. out of that saw before getting to hot its running strong its going to be the little things....Like air filter and chain sharpen this is much more a factor in milling but a saw running 2 hrs stright you can bet on chain and air fliter. Oh and btw you done good with keeping that saw humping like you did!
  14. ironman70

    ironman70 Member

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    Did my best to keep with some of the monster saws that the pro's were using. Overall, very impressed with the 445. Just need to learn a little more about the little things of the saw. Things that allow the saw to run at its highest efficiency...
  15. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    Yep the little thing show up when running that hard if with the pro saws! set wedges as well it will have less friction. Saw dust can build up in the fins of the jug rare but make sure there always clear.
  16. midwestcoast

    midwestcoast Minister of Fire

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    To add to all the good advice here. I find the oiler holes on the bar of my 455 plug-up alot. Not sure if design is the same on 445. I now check them every tank of gas or if bar seems hot. Also, if you're running a 18" bar, maybe try 16 or smaller. Chain will get more oil & engine will be less stressed in big wood.
  17. ironman70

    ironman70 Member

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    Yeah. I was thinking about going to a 16in bar/chain. Don't really cut wood big enough for the 18in.
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