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Husqvarna hard hat with mesh face shield

Post in 'The Gear' started by njtomatoguy, Jul 21, 2006.

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  1. njtomatoguy

    njtomatoguy Feeling the Heat

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    I saw a hard hat for use with a face shield- made by husqvarna - does anyone wear these when using a chainsaw?

    Edit- it was at Lowes on close out- $20.

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  2. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    If you don't want it I will send you the twenty and a pre-paid mailing label. They usually sell it for sixty bucks.
  3. MountainStoveGuy

    MountainStoveGuy Minister of Fire

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    yea, i have one, there nice. they protect your ears, head and face. Thats a great deal!
  4. Roospike

    Roospike New Member

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    Yep , there a must for chainsaw cutting . I have one and so does my 16 year old son ( along with all the rest of the gear ). I got my Husqvarna helmets off Ebay for $40. total . There $48. local . Anyone useing a chainsaw should have all the P.P.E. Your Helmet , chainsaw chaps , gloves , jeans , steel toe work boots . A chainsaw is not a "TOY" and working with limbs , branches and heavy wood is not a joke . All the right gear is a must when working with wood .
  5. suematteva

    suematteva New Member

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    Ehearthbay....Do I hear 25....twenty five dollars.....Whose got 25 for the brand new Husky helmet....
  6. njtomatoguy

    njtomatoguy Feeling the Heat

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    I didn't realize it was such a popular item or I would have grabbed it. They also had stove gasket replacement kits for $3.00

    I picked up 2 sections of Vinyl fence for $10 each, a set of 3 outdoor lights for 4.50 and a brass and bronze bird feeder for $8. and
    Vanity for $10 They are having a sidewalk sale..
  7. jabush

    jabush Feeling the Heat

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    +1

    I like mine as well. In fact the same system was a required purchase back when I went to forestry school.
  8. MountainStoveGuy

    MountainStoveGuy Minister of Fire

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    be carefull of that stove gasket kit, make shure its the right size or you will throw 3 bucks down the drain, did the helments on sale have ear protection? Mine does and they are realy needed.
  9. njtomatoguy

    njtomatoguy Feeling the Heat

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    Thanks for the replies--

    No the hard hat did not have ear protection, and whebn I went back i was gone-- somebody beat me to it-- sorry Bro Bart
  10. njtomatoguy

    njtomatoguy Feeling the Heat

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    MSG-

    I didn't know what size I needed- so I didn't buy it ..

    Dumb Question-- I don't have a chainsaw-- Does anyone else use a sawzall to cut wood--

    I bought a Porter-Cable Tiger saw a few years ago for some demo work on a job-- It seems to breeze through Maple, Cherry, Oak and Ash, which is the wood I have now-- I am using a Dewalt demo blade-- All the wood I have has been scrounged from the curb-- Curbside Recycling, I like to call it-- Do I really need a chainsaw??
  11. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    Ya burns what ya got to burn and ya cut with what ya got to cut with.

    Of course I wouldn't recommend it for falling a hundred year old oak tree. And a SawzAll is a great way to reduce your arms to mush.
  12. suematteva

    suematteva New Member

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    As you do your curbside recycling keep your eyes open for a big bow saw...i got one at a barn sale one time for a dollar..the thing was probably 40-50 years old...put a new blade on it and was it is perfect for all the wood that is 1-4 inches in diameter..when processing a tree i leave this in 6 - 8 ft lengths and cut later...The big find was that i ran into a guy who could actually sharpen the old saw blade..he charged me 5 bucks. the new blade right off the hardware shelf does not cut anywhere near as well as that old one.
  13. jabush

    jabush Feeling the Heat

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    Occasionally I use my (18v cordless) sawzall for light pruning, but I don't cut my cordwood with it. If all your dealing with is 4-6 " diameter pieces of wood, and it works for you, then you are set. I think eventually you will start to find bigger, better finds when you're scrounging, and the sawzall won't be practical for bigger logs. I only go through about 2 cords of wood in the winter, but I can't imagine having my wood pile comprised of mostly small stuff. Too much work!!

    I do have a couple 18v Ryobi chansaws new in the box if you're interested. Just need to purchase battery and charger from Home Cheepo. The (cordless) chainsaw will handle bigger stuff than your sawzall, but max diameter cut is still in the 6-7 " range.

    **TIP**----wax your sawzall blade and it will go through the wood much easier.

    hth...
  14. suematteva

    suematteva New Member

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    Hello Jabush,

    what are looking for the cordless chainsaws? thanks
  15. jabush

    jabush Feeling the Heat

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    PM sent...
  16. njtomatoguy

    njtomatoguy Feeling the Heat

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    Jabush-
    Thanks for the tip. I will definitely try that..
    Most of the wood I pick up is smaller stuff-or precut by tree crews into rounds already..

    Here's a dumb question- What is the safest chainsaw I can buy?

    It seems like they are very dangerous, from all the posts and books I've read..

    Thanks

    Bob
  17. jabush

    jabush Feeling the Heat

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    All chinsaws need to be handled very carefully. As far as the safest saw...I'll defer to others here that have more experience with what's out there today as my gas saw is twenty plus years old. I think the most important thing is to read the owners manual carefully and heed all the warnings. Familiarize yourself with the saw and take it slow at first. Gear wise you'll want a hardhat system as mentioned in your original post (with hearing protection) as well as gloves, chainsaw chaps to protect your legs, heavy boots. You will also need to have gas/ 2cycle oil, bar oil, a file to touch up your chain, etc... It is more of an investment than just the saw, so you have to decide if it's something you want to get into.

    If you have a power source close to where you process your wood, a corded electric saw eliminates the need to store the 2 cycle gas mix. From what I understand there are some real nice electric saws out there. As far as cordless saws...I haven't seen anything out there that beats the 18v Ryobi. It's a nice little saw(10" bar), and it works nicely for it's intended purpose. Like all cordless tools, battery management is a must. MAX cut is in the 6-7" range, but I do break mine out for small pruning jobs.

    Whatever you decide to go with, make sure you have the proper safety gear and pay attention to what's going on while using the saw.
    I'm sure others can add a lot to my post on this stuff, as I tried not to ramble too much. Also I tend to take some of the safety knowledge for granted as I spent several years working in the woods back in the day.

    hth Bob...

    joel
  18. Roospike

    Roospike New Member

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    NO chainsaw is safe . The newer more modern chainsaws are a little more safe than the old ones . The new modern style chainsaws have a chain brake in case of kick back . The most dangerous chainsaw is an electric chainsaw . They are less likely to stop if you were to hit some body part .
  19. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    Having hit a body part with Ol'Yaller I am here to tell ya that a five horse gas saw ain't likely to stop either.
  20. suematteva

    suematteva New Member

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    Another safety item on a chainsaw is the tip guard. I have never run a saw with this on it..Many people remove them...One thing I have done with my saw is that the chain brake is physically very close to my top hand, almost touches my hand..I run an 80 cc husky that is over 20 years old. (hence Vintage 181) Not sure if you can do this with new saws, as the design of the trip arm is different.

    Remember hearing some research on chainsaw cuts. Research documented the speed of the saw chain on a typical pro saw and how many teeth would travel through the cut before you felt it...It is staggering..respect the saw...
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