I’m Back! Window Quilts to hold heat in?

ispinwool Posted By ispinwool, Nov 9, 2011 at 6:52 PM

  1. ispinwool

    ispinwool
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    Feb 5, 2010
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    Hi Folks!
    I haven't been around much...I got totally disgusted with a smokey woodburner that wouldn't
    cooperate no matter what we did. We even quit burning too early because it was such a nuisance.

    SO....the chimney man was here today--we now have a beautifully TALL chimney going straight UP!

    I can't wait to try it out!!!!

    ....As usual...I have a question: Does anyone out there have thermal window "quilts" to help
    keep the heat in? I'm wondering how effective they are.....

    Thanks!
     
  2. webbie

    webbie
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    I had a number of window quilts in my last home and they made a vast difference in the warmth. As you say, they hold the heat in well.

    We had single glazed Andersen windows with good storm windows there.

    So, yes, the answer is that they are very effective!

    Here's hoping your smoke problem is fixed.
     
  3. smokinj

    smokinj
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    I have fleece backers for all the window. Double pane windows, but its a major difference.
     
  4. woodgeek

    woodgeek
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    Some older folks here liked to cut thin rigid foam (poly-iso) into a friction fit, and then cover them in a pretty fabric using a spray adhesive. Only problem--where to put them during the day?
     
  5. Shari

    Shari
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    Craig & SJ - Could you better describe the construction of your 'shades'?
     
  6. oldspark

    oldspark
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    Yea I would like to have manufactors names as I too am looking into this.
     
  7. pyper

    pyper
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    Another problem: rigid foam, at least all I've ever bought, is a fire hazard. See warning on p.3:
    http://www.rmaxinc.com/downloads/DataSheets/rmp3.pdf

    To the original question, I don't have window quilts, but even just curtains do a great job at reducing convection (drafts). Quilts would add a little R value, which would be a good thing, but I bet stopping the convection is even more important.
     
  8. peakbagger

    peakbagger
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    I use the double cellular blinds with side tracks in place of window quilts. The R value and air sealing is similiar and they take up a lot less space when they are retracted. I also have some without side tracks and although still good, they definitely leak more than the ones with side tracks
     
  9. mellow

    mellow
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    I didn't do a quilt but we went to a local fabric shop and found the thickest material that looked nice and made our own drapes to put over the windows, made a big difference and keeps the sunlight out in the morning for sleeping in, well atleast that was the case before we had kids.
     
  10. velvetfoot

    velvetfoot
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    Thing is, doesn't the room air infiltrate around the quilt and condense on the window?
     
  11. Dune

    Dune
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    Do a search of this site. We had a big thread on this a while back. Tons of info.
     
  12. woodgeek

    woodgeek
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    agreed. If I were doing this (I'm not), I would use the stuff with foil on both sides, and foil tape the edges. Of course, in a house fire, it would still outgas nasties...
     
  13. ispinwool

    ispinwool
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    I'm wondering the same thing......
     
  14. Dune

    Dune
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    velcro.
     
  15. ispinwool

    ispinwool
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    thanks! :)
     
  16. Dune

    Dune
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    If you found it, it would be kind of you to put a link to it here in this thread.
    Thanks.
     
  17. kenora

    kenora
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  18. sesmith

    sesmith
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    We made some homemade window quilts many years ago. They worked, but we ended up leaving them either up or down all the time. We then tried interior storms that we cut out of acrylic and held in place with magnetic tape on the acrylic and steel tape on the window trim. Those worked great. We eventually replaced all the windows over the years, but I still use them over my velux roof windows and use one on my bathroom window that since developed a leak. I use velcro to hold these in place as I haven't been able to find the steel tape. Besides cutting down on the leakage, they significantly cut down on moisture collecting on the glass.
     
  19. ispinwool

    ispinwool
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    Here's a good one:

    http://hearth.com/econtent/index.php/forums/viewthread/3903/P0/
     
  20. mayhem

    mayhem
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    I have heavy drapes in my living room to cover my three sets of sliding doors. They definitely help reduce any draft from the windoes, but IMHO the best solution is to use the heat shrink plastic window wraps to stop the air exchange.
     
  21. GaryGary

    GaryGary
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    Hi,
    We use the Symphony cellular shades with the side track -- have had some for quite a while and just added a couple more. I think they work well, and the side tracks seem like a good idea.

    I've collected a bunch of DIY window thermal treatments here:
    http://www.builditsolar.com/Projects/Conservation/conservation.htm#WindowTreatments

    We actually use the triple wall polycarbonate inside storms, and also the "half insulating" shutter, and a few windows with bubble wrap -- they all seem to work.

    I was thinking yesterday that the top-down, bottom-up cellular shades might work out well. For situations where you want some light, you could open the shade from the top down a ways to let light in the top part of the window, while the bottom part of the window remains insulated by the shade.

    Gary
     
  22. semipro

    semipro
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    We also use the Symphony shades and they work well.

    Even if you're not into those you should check out the thermal IR images they have at their website showing how cold air moves around window treatments. It should help with DIYers.
     
  23. jeromehdmc

    jeromehdmc
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    I've heard of people cutting bubble wrap to size spritzing the window with water and sticking the bubble wrap to the window. It lets the light through and insulates also. I haven't tried it but it sounds like it wouldn't hurt.
     
  24. Amaralluis

    Amaralluis
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    I like this window quilt system.
    Does anyone know if theres an equivalent of these quilts but one that would be transparent?

    Right now we use the home hardware window kits with the plastic sheet and double side tape, but we remove them every year and the tape leaves a nasty yellow line on the trim and its making it hard for new tap to stick...
    This system would eliminate the neeed for this double work every year but we would want a transparent one so we would have sunlight coming into the room...
     

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