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I got a free wood stove, need installation advice.

Post in 'Classic Wood Stove Forums (prior to approx. 1993)' started by walter stern, Nov 3, 2013.

  1. walter stern

    walter stern New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2013
    Messages:
    2
    Loc:
    walnut grove, mn
    I Moved into a new house last May. The guy that used to live here had a wood stove he'd used all 9 years he lived here, but he took it with him when he left. My boss got a new wood stove, and gave me his old one. [It is 32" wide by 28" deep.]
    [​IMG]
    The "freebie" is very old, it used to be in the basement of an old farmhouse, but in the last 10 years or more of its use it was just inside a shop on that same farm. I have no idea the make model year or anything.
    It has an 8" exhaust vent (I think called a flue? sorry I'm new at this) and 4" fresh air intake beneath it.
    [​IMG]


    The problem I run into is that the house I live in has a brick chimney in the center of the house, but the chimney tap hole that was used by the previous guy's wood stove is only 6".
    [​IMG]
    I hear its a bad idea to reduce the size of the exhaust from 8" to 6", so I talked to a local HVAC guy and he said I should just hammer drill around the opening to make it larger. I thought that wouldn't be too much of a challenge for me. However once I get the hole large enough, what do I install to receive the 8" stove pipe? right now there is a solid metal ring in the chimney that is 6" but i do no know what that is called or if its the proper way to tap into a chimney.

    I've been googling around the web for a while and this site seems to have the most relevant info, thanks in advace for your help

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  2. webbie

    webbie Seasoned Moderator Staff Member

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    Nov 17, 2005
    Messages:
    12,100
    Loc:
    Western Mass.
    Well, a few things.
    First, the avatar. Check out our FAQ:
    http://www.hearth.com/talk/faq/avatars-signatures-pictures-etc.11/

    Now to the stove. I don't like the looks of it. It has a homemade or local-made look and I highly doubt that this stove has any manual, testing or listing. In plain language that means most building codes would not allow it to be installed in a modern residence and the same with insurance companies.....

    If you were going to install it, you'd need to use NFPA "generic" stove specs and clearances, for which you can find a lot of info on this site (search about, check the info articles for "wood stove clearances").

    Now the chimney......before you consider an installation, you should have a pro inspect the chimney from top to bottom. Most chimney sweeps will tell you that many (maybe a majority) of chimneys they see are not up to present standards or have gross defects which render them unsafe.

    If the chimney passed muster, the same sweep can probably install a larger thimble - this is another job that must be carefully looked at and done or could be dangerous. Even if you did that, the vertical part of the chimney might be small (you or the sweep should measure it) so you may be downsizing anyway.

    Sorry to be the bearer of bad news, but that's why we are here - to try and assure your safety!
  3. BP in ME

    BP in ME New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2013
    Messages:
    2
    Loc:
    Hampden, ME
    It does look like a beast. Is there a manufacturer's plate on the back?
  4. walter stern

    walter stern New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2013
    Messages:
    2
    Loc:
    walnut grove, mn
    Sadly, there is not, I've looked, but haven't seen any real markings
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    What size of floor protection is needed, I thought I had read 18" in the front, and 8" on the sides and rear, is that correct?
  5. fossil

    fossil Accidental Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
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    Loc:
    Bend, OR
    Since you have no documentation on that thing, you must default to NFPA 211, which is a set of standards that define what you must do. First off, there must be 36" clearance from the nearest combustible material on all sides of the appliance. THere are approved ways of reducing these clearances by the use of wall heat shields. The shields must be constructed and installed as defined in NFPA 211. Floor protection must extend 18" on all sides. The exact nature of the required floor protection will require some study, but since it looks like the floor is combustible, the stove will have to sit upon a composite of masonry units and sheet metal.

    Quite frankly, I don't think that thing's worth all the trouble and expense. I would not burn in that thing in my home. Rick
  6. dmmoss51

    dmmoss51 Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2013
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    355
    Loc:
    Michigan
    Free things are hard to pass up but this will be far from free by time you make necessary modifications by then get a newer efficient stove so you don't go through so much wood. Lots of great resources and reviews on the site. Welcome
    Motor7 likes this.
  7. Motor7

    Motor7 Feeling the Heat

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    Nov 10, 2009
    Messages:
    384
    Loc:
    East TN.
    I have to agree. I have never seen a stove like that one, doesn't mean it's bad, but you will spend a lot of time and $ to make it a safe install. I would sell it on CL(it wil make a great shop/garage stove) then do some research on a newer stove with a 6" flue. Plug it in and enjoy the heat.
  8. jjs777_fzr

    jjs777_fzr Feeling the Heat

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    Loc:
    NorthShore, MA USA
    If you can afford it - go out and buy a new stove. The efficiency of a newer stove will likley save you a ton of wood. Plus - newer stoves usually have a glass view window. There's nothing like watching the fire. Some old stoves are worth saving and using...some aren't.
    Defiant likes this.
  9. Defiant

    Defiant Vermont Castings Geek

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    Old Lyme CT
    I concur with the opinions above, I have seen a few of these in our local scrap yard, the finials have me thinking it is a Franklin Stove product, but none the less find yourself a 6" vented unit, you will have more heat in the house;)
  10. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    South Puget Sound, WA
    With the raked back on this stove it looks more like an insert. If so it wasn't designed for freestanding use. The grey areas at the welds concern me. I wouldn't want this thing losing a side weld with a raging fire inside. Personally I would get a better stove to start with.
  11. petee2

    petee2 New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2012
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    Loc:
    New jersey USA
    Sorry but free is sometimes more expensive..... I am in NJ My town has restrictions and codes for the woodstove my "free stove" did not go over well
    I have an 8" flue ( not allowed to reduce without mfg statement) clearences were rediculous without papers saying what they should be. (42' on all sides)
    and the other issue was my insurance they wanted professional install without the papers as well
  12. petee2

    petee2 New Member

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    Loc:
    New jersey USA
    I now have a beattibul BEAST it's a Waterford 103
  13. My Oslo heats my home

    My Oslo heats my home Minister of Fire

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    Loc:
    South Shore, MA
    I'd say it has seen it's time and is about to to be set to pasture. I think it holds more risk than good. The cons outweigh the pros.
  14. valley ranch

    valley ranch Feeling the Heat

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    Ranches in Sierra Nevada mts,Calif & Nevada
    Put that thing in a heat with it for a while. You can figure out/find out what is needed. Sit in front of it and have a large brandy. When you're ready to get one with a glass in door, step up. My first stove was a barrel stove I made at work, it worked well, I cooked on it as I built the house. I heated water to bathe on the porch until I put in the water heater. Then one day I bought a brand new stove, they cost $240 at the time, I put glass in the door. Now I'm building a tube rack so I can see the secondary burn.

    Now if you live somewhere, you haven't the freedom to install the stove, go to plan B. If you want to have wood heat and want to start with this one, don't be heckled or bullied out of it. You'll soon step up or fabricate up. Do it and have fun with it. Happy Thanksgiving.

    Richard
  15. fossil

    fossil Accidental Moderator Staff Member

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    Bend, OR
    Well, Richard...encouraging folks to do things that are patently unsafe is not what we do here. Nor do we heckle or bully. If the OP decides to use this appliance in his home, that's his business, but he came here asking for advice, and he's getting advice that he can accept or reject. Rick

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