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I have gotten so used to burning partially seasoned wood in the past

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by lowroadacres, Dec 17, 2010.

  1. lowroadacres

    lowroadacres Minister of Fire

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    I have gotten so used to burning partially seasoned wood over the years that the glass on the stove used to need cleaning almost daily.

    This year I had only cleaned it once when one piece of wood left a black patch where the moisture and smoke came out on the glass as I loaded North-South.

    This morning as I reloaded the stove I thought that maybe I should give the glass a wipedown. While there wasn't much on the glass it was enough that when I looked at the fire after it seemed like a brand new stove.

    I can only imagine what joys await next winter when we get into wood that has been seasoning for more than 12 months. I wonder how many people have been turned off of wood heat because of impatience and improperly seasoned firewood. Imagine how many stoves are sitting idle in basements and garages due to these factors? If I had the patience and money right now I would very much like to get my WETT certification because there has to be a significant market in our region for "wood heat coaching". The challenge would be getting people to pay for it when the very nature of being a wood heat fan means we are self sufficient and independent by nature.

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  2. LLigetfa

    LLigetfa Minister of Fire

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    Ja, they are by nature a bunch of know-it-all cheapskates. The second challenge is to prove that what the firewood mongers call "seasoned" is anything but.

    Having good wood is just a small part of it. Having a proper install and properly balanced air in the home is as big a "Joy" factor in burning wood.
  3. ControlFreak

    ControlFreak Feeling the Heat

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    "I can only imagine what joys await next winter when we get into wood that has been seasoning for more than 12 months. I wonder how many people have been turned off of wood heat because of impatience and improperly seasoned firewood. Imagine how many stoves are sitting idle in basements and garages due to these factors? If I had the patience and money right now I would very much like to get my WETT certification because there has to be a significant market in our region for “wood heat coachingâ€. The challenge would be getting people to pay for it when the very nature of being a wood heat fan means we are self sufficient and independent by nature. "

    PREACH IT BRO!
  4. ChillyGator

    ChillyGator New Member

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    I hear ya....burning wood c/s/s'ed October 2009 (Water Oak) and what a difference from last season......next year I'll have 2 year seasoned wood which is like 10years up north!
  5. firefighterjake

    firefighterjake Minister of Fire

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    You might be right . . . many folks seem to think burning wood is dirty as they may be thinking of dealing with the creosote and black glass . . . other folks may think of wood burners and think of a house that smells like smoke . . . and others may think of a fire that doesn't give off a whole lot of heat.

    Just wait until you get your hands on some 12+ month seasoned wood . . . it's a whole other experience . . . and the clean glass is just one small aspect -- having the wood light up quicker with less kindling on a fresh start, having very intense and long-lasting secondaries and being able to often close the draft more than usual to prolong the fire are some of the more tangible benefits that come with using good wood.
  6. woodchip

    woodchip Minister of Fire

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    The best advert for a decently installed woodburner is to invite the sceptics round and make sure you have a really hot room (not usually difficult), burning the best seasoned oak you have, and clean round the stove before they arrive (I often drop bits of bark off the wood I bring in).

    Just watch the faces as they get knocked back by the heat, and surprise at the neatness of the stove :)
  7. Slow1

    Slow1 Minister of Fire

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    +1 on this point. I have had several friends who have expressed surprise at how clean we burn. Things like "I don't smell your stove" and such. I've enjoyed the surprise when talking to someone at the house about burning as they realize that not only am I serious about burning but that the house is currently heated by the wood and they didn't even realize it when they walked in. Lack of visible smoke outside or noticeable smell anywhere while keeping the house up to temp is one of my criteria for 'successful' wood burning. Then there was the one person who had a hard time believing that the fire with the wispy flames was really real despite all the heat of the stove (it does take all sorts eh?).
  8. lowroadacres

    lowroadacres Minister of Fire

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    I find that interest in heating with wood is cyclical. Many people will try it for a period of time in their lives but circumstances such as work schedule, injury, a move, a change in family dynamics, an improvement in one's economic position or any other number of factors moves people away from heating with wood.

    I see the same dynamics at play with gardening, hunting, small heard livestock production, and other self sufficiency based activities.

    Let's be honest with our selves in that there is a lot of work involved in our pursuit of warming our homes with a natural and renewable substance. We have all read the humorous and all too real pieces about "How I Save Money Heating With Wood" that talks about the three chainsaws, the trailer, the half ton, the broken rear window of the truck, etc etc.

    I still believe very firmly that as a society we would be far better off if we relied less on the combination of corporate and government structures when it comes to basics that we are capable of providing for our selves. Even if it is just as a backup plan.

    Yes, having friends and family experience proper wood heat at work is the best possible advertisement for our pursuit. Far too many people have tried to use wood heat without any real understanding of the dynamics beyond "light it and give it lots of air" and in the end they have been disappointed.

    Funny thing though. My parents have recently purchased an older house that has a tiny little fireplace which they have begun to use occasionally. As Dad and I were talking this week about the Fisher Baby Bear we installed in two different homes he got a bit nostalgic. He asked me to keep my eyes open for one as he would consider putting it in the garage if he could get his insurance company to play ball.
  9. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    Yes, the dirty is a big part of why some folks won't have wood heat. Many moons ago we bought a stove that was basically new. Only 3 or 4 fires had been in this stove. The female of the house just didn't like the dirty wood. Of course, that bright white carpeting she had in the stove room told the story. I'm betting they vacuumed after every time wood was brought in. Oh well, I got a nice deal!


    On the seasoned wood. People are amazed when they start burning wood that has seasoned for a year and sometimes 2 years. Yet, there can still be a big difference in time. We've been burning wood that was 6-7 years in the stack and this year we are burning some that was split and stacked early in 2009. Yes, the wood is dry and burns good....but we can surely tell the difference between the 6-7 year wood vs. the 1-2 year wood. The older is the best and we've noticed when burning the newer wood that it takes more wood for the heat we get.
  10. LLigetfa

    LLigetfa Minister of Fire

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    It's also the reason some folk opt for an OWB thinking that it will keep the dirt and smell outside. Later, they find out that OWBs spew crud all over your yard and stick to your boots. They spew stink as well and even if you're lucky enough not to have the wind blow the stink into the house, the stink gets on your clothes when you're out feeding the monster which you then bring back into the house with you.

    Now, I tend to tar all OWBs with a broad brush but there probably is one in a hundred that is the exception and that one will probably flame me for what I said.
  11. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    I couldn't agree more LLigetfa. Those things can be nasty. I have one neighbor that installed his a long ways from the house. He probably loses a little heat in that distance but he also heats a shop with it. Being a long distance it doesn't seem bad there. On top of it, there is woods on the north and west side of the boiler so the smoke usually isn't too bad there. I still don't want one.
  12. Larry in OK

    Larry in OK Member

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    One of my neighbors down the road uses a homebuilt outdoor wood furnace. It works well to heat his house but you could fit a couple of grown men inthe firebox with out cramping them too much. When I go out early in the mornings when the wind is right I can smell his smoke and he's a good 200 yds down the road from me
    He burns a bunch of wood and burns green wood as he can't keep enough seasoned wood.

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