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I need a clue on clearances for my older Schrader stove

Post in 'Classic Wood Stove Forums (prior to approx. 1993)' started by jaffro, Jun 4, 2011.

  1. jaffro

    jaffro New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2011
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    2
    Loc:
    Oregon
    My actual stove box is 16.5"wide x 19"deep. The floor is fairly simple. The info i find ranges 12" to 18" on the sides. I am good with 18" on the front & sides (mostly) for floor protection. I can reduce the wall clearance to 12" with a proper barrier. The width of the base would be 52.5" (shooting more for 50"). This happens to be the same width/space i have to make my wall barrier. It is between a door on one side & a window on the other. This is all on the same (long) wall. Now comes the headache. The info i find says that i have to measure diagonally from the back corner of my stove to the edge of my wall protection witch must be at least 36". To get this clearance i would have to put my wall protection over my window or with a 50" wide wall protection move my stove out to 30" from the wall. Moving it out would put the floor protection about 70" into the room. This would be the middle of my living room. What am i missing. I have seen similar stoves in much smaller spaces. I would like to do this right, i even bought the triple wall pipe & roof kit, but the numbers i am coming up with seem a little extreme. I don't under stand how the floor protection is good at 52. 5" wide (and doesn't deviate) but the wall protection is so huge. Any help would be greatly appreciated, thanks.

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  2. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    Welcome jaffo. Caveat here, you do know that installing this stove in Oregon is illegal, correct? In OR and WA the stove must be an EPA stove.

    Here's an article on clearances that should be a helpful start. If you have a wall shield, then the clearance are reduced depending on the construction of the wall shield. Pictures or a simple diagram can help us see what other complications there might be. http://hearth.com/econtent/index.php/articles/wood_stove_clearances_installing_it_safely
  3. fossil

    fossil Accidental Moderator Staff Member

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    10,184
    Loc:
    Bend, OR
    You haven't given us much information about the stove, but a quick check of the current list of EPA approved wood stoves showed no Schraders. That means it's illegal to sell or install in Oregon. That means no permit. No permit = no inspection. No permit, no inspection = no insurance coverage. I s'pose that if you're hell bent on installing and burning this thing in your home, you could probably figure out how to do it safely...a thorough understanding of the recommendations laid out in NFPA 211 would be a start...but you'll have to keep the whole thing under the radar. And if anything should ever go wrong, you'll be SOL. Rick

    http://www.deq.state.or.us/aq/burning/woodstoves/buysell.htm
  4. jaffro

    jaffro New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2011
    Messages:
    2
    Loc:
    Oregon
    my house was built in the 40's and the stove was installed long before i bought the house. the current hearth & old double wall are in need of an upgrade. i am just attempting to do it up right (so i can sleep at night). It would be nice to get a newer stove but i just dropped a chunk of change on triple wall piping materials. I am hoping my "grandfather clause" isn't lost just because i am trying to upgrade degraded materials.
  5. fossil

    fossil Accidental Moderator Staff Member

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    Loc:
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    Depends on when you bought the house. Check the link to Oregon DEQ in my last post and do some exploring around on that site. Rick
  6. webbie

    webbie Seasoned Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2005
    Messages:
    12,290
    Loc:
    Western Mass.
    If this is up on a decent pedestal, I think you would be fine with 12" floor clearance on the sides where there is no loading door. Heat does not radiate downward on an angle very much - floor protection is mostly for sparks (in front).

    As an example - enclosed is from a medium-large Kuma woodstove...notice it is tested to 6" on the side.

    BUT, if you have no owners manual or label or other information, the installation is subject to the AHJ - meaning the Authority Having Jurisdiction... the Building and Fire Officials!

    It is understandable that the clearances you mention do not make sense. Many stoves were not even tested for clearances - or at least never tested for what the best possibly clearances are...and unless they were tested that way. the label and manual cannot mention it might be safe with closer specs.

    Attached Files:

  7. stoveguy2esw

    stoveguy2esw Minister of Fire

    Joined:
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    Loc:
    madison hgts. va
    go here.... http://www.nfpa.org/aboutthecodes/AboutTheCodes.asp?DocNum=211&cookie;_test=1 give e mail then NFPA will send a request for e mail verification click on their link in the return e mail then open the "realread" version, you cannot copy it but you can read it online at no charge

    this is what to look for;
    NFPA211 specified clearance to unlisted woodstove, or listed woodstove which does not have a clearance chart on the data tag of the unit or if tag is missing : floor protection minimum 18 inches in all directions, and 36 inches clearance to combustibles in all directions with wall shields this can be reduced in respect to the clearances but the floor protection is not reducable in these cases. refer to the chart on page 42 of the 2010 version i linked you to for verification of clearances, refer to page 43 chart with descriptions of acceptable wall protection and their specified reduction some allow as close as 12 inches (or a reduction of 66%) bear in mind if using single wall pipe for your chimney connection (stove to wall or ceiling) 18 inches is required from the pipe to combustibles (reduceable also see pages 28 and 29) page 30 deals with the floor protection requirements.


    hope this helps ya

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