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I'd like to identify/upgrade this old stove...

Post in 'Classic Wood Stove Forums (prior to approx. 1993)' started by aardquark, Oct 2, 2012.

  1. aardquark

    aardquark New Member

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    Loc:
    Wappingers Falls, NY
    I have this old stove that I cannot identify:

    [​IMG]

    The problem is, it has no air inlet, and can only be burned with the doors open or ajar. I'd like to modify it by adding an air inlet, and/or possibly new doors with glass. So can anybody help with:
    • identify the stove (possibly from the 1980's, based on the age of the house)
    • source of replacement doors
    • aftermarket parts such that I can add a new input air control (slider, etc.)
    Thanks everyone. I look forward to your input.

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  2. BrowningBAR

    BrowningBAR Minister of Fire

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    Looks like an old Jotul Combifire or a knockoff.
  3. sebring

    sebring Member

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    Looks like a good place for a modern stove, where you could see the fire.
    Seasoned Oak and ScotO like this.
  4. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    I think that might be a Morso 1125.
    webbie likes this.
  5. aardquark

    aardquark New Member

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    By golly, I think you've done it! I googled it and the photos match exactly. My hat's off to you sir!

    Now the next step is parts/modification...
  6. BrowningBAR

    BrowningBAR Minister of Fire

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    I was close! :)

    But, yeah, I forgot about Morso's equally strange stove.
  7. aardquark

    aardquark New Member

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    I see from reading a manual I found online that the stove has a hollow handle that let in air. The stove sits in another state so I can't quickly check, but it must be a very small inlet. I searched all over that stove and never noticed any way for air to enter (other than leaving the door open).
  8. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Before modifying the stove make sure the wood is well seasoned. Poorly seasoned wood can make a fire seem like it needs more air too.
    hilbiliarkiboi likes this.
  9. aardquark

    aardquark New Member

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    My initial concern was what to do at bedtime with a fire still burning: close the door tight and worry about possible CO poisoning... or leave it open and worry about a log falling out onto the floor. But now I feel a little better about closing the door, knowing the stove actually has an air control (however small). I don't think I will need to add any more input air. However, glass doors would be nice... Maybe I'll think about fabricating a new set of doors. Anybody done anything like that?
  10. webbie

    webbie Seasoned Moderator Staff Member

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    Morso 1125 gets air through the hollow handle - and, the handle is designed to close partially, which allows some air in through the doors. It is a fine fine stove! If you have good wood and a good draft, it should really heat up a storm.
  11. hilbiliarkiboi

    hilbiliarkiboi Member

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    Look and sounds like a good setup. Top vent, straight up to chimney? What type. is chimney? Welcome to the best source I've found for all info needed to burn.
    Man I love that avatar. Is that something u have had built or stock photo?
    Been burning that Morso very long?
    Are the doors gasketed? U could try the dollar bill test or smoke test around the doors.
    That vent looks like is should draw very well- 6 or 8" pipe? Visual inspection?

    Looks nice and functional! Keep us informed, and fabersham.
  12. aardquark

    aardquark New Member

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    That is a custom heat-storage stove (aka Finnish fireplace) that I designed and built back in the '90's. It is still in use providing (supplemental) heat to our home. I took that photo last night. 'Tis a wonderful thing to pass by in the dead of winter and feel the warmth radiating from it, 12 hours after the last fire has died out.
  13. aardquark

    aardquark New Member

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    Yes, top vent, goes straight up with 8" single wall pipe to near the ceiling, then to what appears to be double or triple wall stainless.

    No, just recently purchased the house, have only burned one fire. It seemed to start easily, good draw, as to be expected from the approx 30 foot chimney height. The door gaskets are in fair to good condition, seems to seal pretty well, but only time (more fires) will tell. My guess is that in spite of the age, this stove has not seen much service, as this property is really a "summer" house and probably was rarely used in the heating season.
  14. hilbiliarkiboi

    hilbiliarkiboi Member

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    Wow! Avatar looks a little like an oven.

    My father has a monthly 'breakfast' with buddies, and saw a similar situation with a lightly used stove in a lake cottage.
    Gonna follow up on that for some folks here at the hearth.
  15. innkeeper

    innkeeper Member

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    Morso 1125 probably 1976-80. I ran one from 1976 until 2007 when I replaced it with a VC Encore 2550. It was a great stove and put out a lot of hear for us through the years. With the doors open and the screen in was a pretty fireplace. It is very simple to run...look at the back of the handle and you will find a screw cam...there is a slight warp designed into the doors so that when just lightly closed a lot of combustion air is allowed into the firebox, if you close the handle more tightly, the air supply is reduced. There is also a 1/4" hole thru the handle so that there is always a little air getting in so the fire never really just smoulders. You should also have a damper in the flue collar which will help control the draft. It always burned cleanly for us...not much to clean out of the chimney.
    I sold it to a friend when we bought the encore and it is still running nicely.
    It will not pass the dollar bill test with the doors just closed lightly, but should if you close it down hard..watch the condition of the door gaskets and replace as needed....

    Enjoy the stove if you decide to keep it...if not, it can sell for $300-400.
    hilbiliarkiboi likes this.
  16. aardquark

    aardquark New Member

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    I had the opportunity over the weekend to build a fire in the Morso. I like it. Even though (to me) the air control seems a little unconventional, it was fairly easy to maintain a stack temperature between 400-500 F during most of the burn, until the charcoal phase at the end. I think I'll keep it.
  17. Seasoned Oak

    Seasoned Oak Minister of Fire

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    I agree,you can buy a good EPA stove very cheap these days. From $500 and up. I cant imagine not being able to see the fire (A big consideration) and also the chimney and creasote fires associated with these old smoke dragons.

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