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Ideas for stacking w/ little real estate?

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by Bster13, Aug 22, 2013.

  1. Bster13

    Bster13 Minister of Fire

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    I see folks with a good amount of land being able to stack a lot of wood, but are there any tips/pics/videos/examples of folks cramming in a lot of wood in a small amount of space?

    Already, I would no longer stack some of my first stacks individually, but I would lean two stacks into each other. The other thought is to use some very tall garden stakes (the big green, metal ones) at the ends of my stacks. This would allow me to stack "regular" right up until the very end and not have to criss cross the ends.

    And of course I could stack higher, but it looks like in order to do this in a stable way I'd have to put perhaps 3 or 4 rows tightly together for the additional stability as I stack higher.

    My wife is sensitive of looking too "country" in the neighborhood, so I hope to keep it relatively clean and neat. (Heck she wants me to install a fence in front of my stacks, but that would increase the payoff time for switching to wood heat)

    Thoughts?

    Here is my current setup:
    http://youtu.be/Mckx8d5uaOA

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  2. peakbagger

    peakbagger Minister of Fire

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    Ideally all the stacks should be in a single row in full sun aligned with the prevailing wind. In reality you work with what you got. The idea of using steel posts or even saplings on either end with a rope through the stack to hold them upright is good. I have also used small straight branches laid between adjacent rows that have a 8" gap between them to tie the stack rows together so they don't fall over sideways, Just stack in long pole with the firewood every few courses. One thing to consider is to get rid of the plastic on the tops of rows, unless you can install the plastic so that water runs off to the sides or ends, it usually slows drying rather then speeds it up. I would suggest checking out home centers or the local recycling center to see if you can get some bent or odd spec metal roofing to lay on top of the stacks, it gives good air circulation and sheds water well. If you do decide to stack high make darn sure that you don't have little folks around that might climb the stacks and get hurt.
  3. CTFIRE

    CTFIRE Member

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    feb3.JPG
  4. gzecc

    gzecc Minister of Fire

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    IMO the best way to manage wood inventory is to have the best wood possible. Best equals, highest output and fastest seasoning. These species are Ash, Locust, Beech, Hard Maples. Stay away from Oak. it requires 2-3 yrs of seasoning. I have 2+acres and don't have room for wood to season for 3 yrs. The only way I take oak is if someone drops it in my yard for me. That sometimes happens.
  5. Bster13

    Bster13 Minister of Fire

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    I don't believe in Holzhaufens, but they do look nice.

    As a scrounger, I'd love to be selective, but if someone gives me free wood (even Oak ) I need to take it at this point.

    The idea of putting a straight stick in between rows and then stringing piles to keep the upright is a nice idea. The clear plastic was my way to minimize how much the stacks stick out to the neighborhood (and to the wife). But perhaps next time I will cut the strips wider so it ensues the rain runs off.
    basod and Backwoods Savage like this.
  6. CTFIRE

    CTFIRE Member

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    Not sure belief systems enter into it, but have you ever tried one? My stuff dries quickly and they do look good. Good luck
  7. Applesister

    Applesister Minister of Fire

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    I think cubes might work if you elevate the pile off the ground and I like stacking on elevated gravel beds. . With airflow under the stacks you could probably get rid of the random plastic.
    In my opinion what looks crappy with wood piles is plastic tarps and random shaped roofing. (which is what I have, lol.) Neatly stacked even topped stacks are way more appealing visually. The cross hatching cribbing is a pain in the A$$ but looks really sharp. Privacy fencing blocks airflow to the area. Dont waste your time or money on that.
    You dont want a rodent den.
    Spray weed vegetation with Round Up and cut back tree limb overhang to just neaten your work area.
    Top covering with roofing keeps the wood tan colored instead of black and gray but color isnt as critical as neat stacks.
    But you have ALOT of wood. It was probably best that you focused on volumn of wood instead of the visual esthetics of pile hoarding.
    Personally I'd stack on the lawn in full sun. Buy the wife a dress. Okay...maybe a BMW Z4.
    Gark and Bster13 like this.
  8. Bster13

    Bster13 Minister of Fire

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    My belief was based off searching hearth.com for a few days. If they work well for you that's cool.

    Backwoods Savage likes this.
  9. MrWhoopee

    MrWhoopee Minister of Fire

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    Firewood5.jpg
    Soundchasm, HDRock, Trooper and 4 others like this.
  10. CTFIRE

    CTFIRE Member

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    Where in CT are you Bster?
  11. Bster13

    Bster13 Minister of Fire

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    Where all the rich jerks are who think having a woodpile is too country. :p
  12. Bster13

    Bster13 Minister of Fire

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    Good point about blocking wind with a privacy fence...that's out.

    I did cut down a large limb that overhung so far as to cover part of my roof a few months ago:
    https://sphotos-b.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ash3/s720x720/923042_841124218336_907655854_n.jpg

    Many what a nightmare to clean up the trimming and restart parts of my pile, but it had to be done. You're correct, further trimming will continue, especially the sassafras overhanging my two stacks in the neighbor's yard. that stuff grows so quickly...and the vines that attach itself to the tree, even quicker. :(

    I don't want to invest any more $, but if I can find some garden stakes, I might go that route. I also feel like other folks on hearth.com have more uniform stacks and larger splits than my avg split. I have come to think this is because of my newbie stacking ability, and the fact that I've split my stuff as small as possible to aid in drying this first year. Perhaps this will get easier in coming years.

  13. Applesister

    Applesister Minister of Fire

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    Easiest thing work wise would be to spray back the weeds and trim tree limbs and even up the height of your piles so they are all level. Then if you do cover them it will be easier. Use the wood from the piles that fell over to crib the ends of the stacks.
    The ground stays damp in shaded areas of your lawn. Use pallets or rot resistant woods at the bottom of your stacks. Locust cedar sassafras oak.
  14. Bster13

    Bster13 Minister of Fire

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    I would agree the plastic on top doesn't look great, but I could straighten it out some. Do they make dull gray colored tarps? :p (that won't disintegrate like the typical blue plastic tarp after a year)
  15. Bster13

    Bster13 Minister of Fire

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    I bought bricks from HD and put my stacks up on them with the aide of 2 x 4s I had leftover. I also use part of a fence I had replaced to stack stuff on top. Evening off is a fine idea, and using the wood the wood that fell over to crib is cool too, but I'm lazy, if I can find garden stakes, game on. :p
  16. CTFIRE

    CTFIRE Member

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    I am in Trumbull if you wanted to come check a Holtz in person. They only good thing about where we are is there are a lot of opportunties to get free wood
  17. Applesister

    Applesister Minister of Fire

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    Tarps are expensive and none of them last. Scrap metal roofing (but now you are getting woodchucky again). My sister bought tarps off of Amazon last year and they are all sun rotted.
    I agree with Backwood Savage that wood self retained by cribbing is the cheapest and most esthetically appealling way to stack piles. Zero money investment. zero garbage.
    Backwoods Savage likes this.
  18. ScotO

    ScotO Guest

    Nice even stacks, cross-tied rows every 8', and reclaimed rubber roofing as the top cover......I have almost 30 cord stuffed in a 65' x12' x5' area.....
    works like a charm.

    2013-08-04_20-29-55_147.jpg 2013-08-04_20-30-33_215.jpg
    HDRock, NortheastAl, basod and 2 others like this.
  19. Bster13

    Bster13 Minister of Fire

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    Where do you get reclaimed rubber roofing? I only see shingles and then plaza stores with a tar like substance slathered on for a roof. Definitely not educated in this area...
  20. Applesister

    Applesister Minister of Fire

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    In the long run it doesnt really matter. It all gets cooked in the stove no matter what the curbside appeal is.
    Its all good.
    Im lazy too. Cribbing looks beautiful but its a total pain to do.
  21. ScotO

    ScotO Guest

    Rubber roofing (or EPDM) is what they use on flat roofed buildings, I got mine from a locally demolition salvage dealer. (4) 32'x6 1/2' for $40.00 total! Stuff will be reusable for literally a decade or more.......plus it helps raise the temp up a little in the stack when the suns beating down on it....
    NortheastAl likes this.
  22. NE WOOD BURNER

    NE WOOD BURNER Minister of Fire

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    hmm! that's how I do it right on the front lawn. got two now about 9 cords. one 8 foot diameter and another 12foot diameter.


    got another 8-9 cord lined along driveway with cribbed ends doesn't take any longer to stack cribs if you throw the good crib pieces to the ends as your stacking.

    a while ago there was a poster on here that had an example of how he did it with cement blocks on ends and dimensional lumber for bottom and ends looked easy and very inexpensive.

    IMHO wood looks the best CSS no matter how you stack it!
    CTFIRE likes this.
  23. Bster13

    Bster13 Minister of Fire

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    Is anyone aware of any studies involving the Holzhaufen vs traditional stacking?
  24. NE WOOD BURNER

    NE WOOD BURNER Minister of Fire

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    Lots of discussion on it regarding drying time. But you can't beat the space requirement! you can stack as high as you want just increase the dia. Stacks fast as long as you have access to the whole circumference.
  25. clemsonfor

    clemsonfor Minister of Fire

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    The stakes you talk about are called "T posts" there profile looks like a T. They sell them at Lowes. The big ones like 6-7ft are pricy. I think like $7-9 a peice. They almost never wear out so u orilly won't find discarded ones. They sell some cheaper versions that are more like C posts but they bend if u have hard ground. They sell both at Lowe's usually maybe unless you have a big city Lowes??

    For roofing call commercial roof companies.

    Once your wife starts feeling hoe warm the house is with wood heat she will ease up a bit. And the money saved.

    They make brown tarps, but they still will deteriorate pretty fast. U need some old rusty metal roofing. It blends well.

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