Indeck produce more carbon build-up in the firepot...

Post in 'The Pellet Mill - Pellet and Multifuel Stoves' started by Lake Girl, May 23, 2013.

  1. Lake Girl

    Lake Girl
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    Since Spring seems to be here finally, didn't want to buy a ton of Heartlands that would require storage through the summer (Single bag cost is $3 more per bag - insane). Have been limping along with Indecks from Menards. With a longer period of use than my initial try, I've decided I'll only use the hardwoods under duress. I am consistently getting more carbon build-up in the firepot that is more difficult to remove than with the Heartlands (adjusted draft to compensate for hardwood) . Tried Somersets and Marth pellets also - Somersets not as bad but still not a fan.

    Since the ash seems denser also, do smoke pathways become clogged quicker?

    Likely still have a little while left with night time burning to remove the "chill":(
     
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  2. imacman

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    If the latest burning with the Indeck's has been on the lower heat settings, that may have contributed to the extra carbon build-up. Higher heat settings as in cold month's may reduce build-up.
     
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  3. Lake Girl

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    Understand that burning on low produces more carbon build-up for all pellet types. Was using low settings for all the varieties with an increase of draft for the hardwoods. The carbon build-up from the softwoods flakes off the burnpot in larger pieces and has less stubborn spots. Just my observation:)
     
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  4. smwilliamson

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    Not all units do this on low. I have a Whitfield Advantage II-T that has never had a build up of anything in it. Even burning inferno's...Possibly my best performing stove in the cache. A lot of this really had to do with air flow and burn pot design. Thinking their pot was one of the best I've ever seen. Travis makes a good one too. Enviro (not m55 style) has to be one of the worst.

    No, take that back...Breckwell and US Stove and AES make the worst burn pots, then Enviro.
     
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  5. Don2222

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    Hello

    Burn air and air flow does have alot to do with the issue. A big part of this issue is damp air in the house with no OAK or having an OAK And being in an area that has damp outside air, such as near a lake or ocean. Travis has a secret they will not discuss in their stove, a square hole in the OAK tube inside the stove. So in their stoves when an OAK is used, some of the air is still pulled in from the back of the stove and therefore some of the air is still dried and pre-heated going into the burn pot. One of the best solutions is the Selkirk DT venting system that dries and pre-heats the OAK air. There is no guarantee this will completely fix your problem but it may be worth a try. I did it for both of my stoves. It is a bit costly up front but to have a cleaner stove with less ash buildup in the long run is worth it for me!
    See pics > http://www.hearth.com/talk/threads/raised-waterproof-wood-pellet-stove-hearth-for-garage.104197/

    Also I am good friends with a National Sales Manager at a Major stove manufacturer who has a bigger picture of the country than I do. She said the Selkirk DT has more sales in my area. Gee I think I know why. LOL
     
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  6. skibladerj

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    Just my humble opinion for removing stubborn carbon on the burn pot. If you can shut it down for a hour or two, just take the burn pot out ( I have a US Stove) and put it in a bucket with dish soap and water. Normally the carbon just falls off with out any scrubbing...
     
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  7. Don2222

    Don2222
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    Hello

    The carbon can be removed better and quicker with a wire wheel on your drill/driver. I use it as part of my pro-cleaning.
     
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  8. Lake Girl

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    I take out the burn pot and soak it in water while I clean the interior :)
     
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