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Installing a wood stove… need some advice

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by Hodmokrin, Dec 11, 2012.

  1. Hodmokrin

    Hodmokrin New Member

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    Hello all. Thanks ahead of time for offering any suggestions.

    I have a new construction 24' x 48' garage that is two stories. It is partial block construction (to middle of 2nd floor) and finished on the top with wood (trusses etc). The floor plan is very open. I plan on installing a wood stove listed below:

    Manufacturers Number:B2350B
    Brand:United States Stove
    Fuel Type:Wood/Coal
    Hopper Capacity: 50 lb. Log Size: 23 in.
    BTUs: 106,000

    I want to install it on the first floor (concrete floor). My question is where should I run my chimney?
    Should I plan on going up through the ceiling of the first floor, into the second floor and through that ceiling into the attic, then through the roof? (the garage is something like 22+ feet tall to the eaves) I could build a steel grate to be around the pipe to prevent anyone from touching it etc on the second floor. I would obviously use double wall pipe for the length between the floors, and preferable single wall in the first and second floor in the "open air" spaces to get the most form the heat, followed by double wall for attic/roof. I have heard of people going through closets, etc, does that seem ok?
    My other option is to go through the block wall on the first floor, but then have an ugly, and expensive run of about 20ft insulated chimney pipe to get the desired height above the roof to ensure proper draft.

    I am doing this on as tight of a budget as possible. I have considered pellet stoves, but have an steady unlimited local supply of wood available. I realize it may not heat the second floor completely, so I will supplement with another type of heater up there when needed. I do not have hvac installed in the garage, and would rather not install any. The garage is a very basic rectangle shape. I plan on insulating it very well.

    I'm not sure if I posted this in the correct part of the forum, and I apologize if I did.

    Any suggestions would be appreciated.

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  2. webby3650

    webby3650 Master of Fire

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    Hi, and welcome. Either way you go you will need to do double wall class A chimney from the ceiling below, through the second floor and then continue through the roof. Class A is required to be used from the ceiling up, even if it is open after the "first"ceiling. In the upstairs, where the pipe will be exposed, it is required to be enclosed in a chase of sorts. It's OK to use single wall until you reach the ceiling support. It is also not a good idea to extract as much of the heat from the flue as possible, it may produce some heat in the upstairs, the result will be excessive creosote build-up from reducing the temp. of the flue gases too much. I hope this helps.
  3. DAKSY

    DAKSY Patriot Guard Rider Staff Member

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    You don't indicate where you are located, but if you're gonna hafta deal with a building inspector/code enforcement official, you may find that you can't do this. For the most part, having a wood burning appliance in a garage is a no no. There are just too many HIGHLY flammable items (Gasoline, Brake Cleaner, Solvents) that may combust when their fumes are introduced to an open flame, like when you re-load. Maybe you should re-think this, & consider an OWB or the like...
  4. Hodmokrin

    Hodmokrin New Member

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    Thanks for the replies:

    I'm located in KY.

    I'm new to wood burning forums, and I'm not sure what "OWB" is.

    I spoke to the insurance company, and they seemed to be more concerned about utility vehicles such as atvs etc being in the garage. I store gasoline outside. I have some solvents etc, but they are sealed in proper containers, and located quite a ways from where the stove will be (not to mention I am considering buying some locking metal cabinets to store such items before I install the stove, and plan on storing them in a separate room from the stove)

    The building inspector informed me I just needed to apply for a permit (of course they want some money), and then get it inspected. Apparently I am the first one to actually call the building inspector in this area for a wood stove since the county inspector referred me to the state inspector, which still didn't know exactly what I would need, and had to check on it himself and call me back =). He didn't express too many concerns about the fact that it was in a detached building, and I even explained my plan of running the stove pipe through the second floor to which he said was fine (with proper insulated pipe etc). My experience with my county inspector thus far has been that he likes to briefly glance at something, and then spend most of his time making small talk instead of inspecting which i guess is in my favor, but will require me to know the code better than he does since he doesn't seem to require much, and I want to be safe.
  5. firefighterjake

    firefighterjake Minister of Fire

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    OWB = Outdoor Wood Boiler
  6. Hodmokrin

    Hodmokrin New Member

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    I think the outdoor wood boiler is beyond my budget. I went to some websites that sell them, and as soon as I saw the word "financing" before they offered a price, I knew it was out of my budget (they wanted $10k+ for some basic models). I'm trying to get this done for around $1200.00 to $1400.00 give or take a few hundred. I'm into the garage over 25k already (that may not seem like much to some, but I bought the materials, and built it myself, and was the only way I could afford the garage of my dreams). If you know of any systems even close to my budget, I would be glad to check them out. Thanks for the help.
  7. David Tackett

    David Tackett Member

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    Personally, I would center locate it on 1st floor with a pipe running through the 2nd floor and out the ceiling. With a surround around the pipe on the 2nd floor. Of course all double wall pipe.
  8. DAKSY

    DAKSY Patriot Guard Rider Staff Member

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    NO. That is in total violation of the national fire code. Connector pipe can ONLY be run to the FIRST floor penetration & everything from there up MUST be Class A chimney.
  9. Hodmokrin

    Hodmokrin New Member

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    Isn't most listed double wall pipe class A? Forgive me if that is a stupid question.
  10. DAKSY

    DAKSY Patriot Guard Rider Staff Member

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    Not a stupid question..There pretty much are NO stupid questions when it comes to putting fire in your home (or garage). Class A is chimney. Double wall pipe is connector. Connector does just that. It connects the stove to the chimney & it can be single-wall or double-wall. It is not allowed to penetrate a floor. Only chimney - Class A or masonry - can be used for a floor penetration.
    webby3650 likes this.
  11. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Considering this is new construction I would simplify things unless you are very mechanically inclined and have a big budget. I just put up a new garage and shop. Instead of running heat in the floor I insulated the shop well and laid down interlocking 1/2" flooring (like an exercise mat material). The space is very easy to heat and very comfortable underfoot. Currently I am just using an electric space heater but have a pellet stove I am renovating for the larger garage area. The house is heated independently by a wood stove.

    If I haven't discouraged you and a boiler is in your dreams, then you need to repeat this posting in the Boiler Room forum hear on Hearth.com. They will help you out with the details.
  12. Hodmokrin

    Hodmokrin New Member

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    That's the problem, I am extremely mechanically inclined (used to work in fab shop, tons of mechanical/electrical/welding experience too), but I am restricted by my budget. I think I am going to go with the wood stove listed originally, in the center of the garage, and run the stove through both of the floors and the roof with the appropriate size/insulation pipe/chimney and guards. I am also going to install some vents to help with evenly distributing the temperature between the floors.

    The only problem I have now is figuring out the best place to buy piping/chimney, floor and ceiling kits at the lowest price. Its absurd what some places want for a single length or piece.

    Thanks for everyone's input so far, I think I've got it figured out.
  13. DAKSY

    DAKSY Patriot Guard Rider Staff Member

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    If you're not going to install this correctly, there's no point in thanking us. You DON'T have it figured out SAFELY. Nobody here will approve of an unsafe install & that's what you are going to have. You asked for our advice & you are disregarding it completely. You are putting fire insde a building. Fire will do two things. It will HEAT your home or it will EAT your home. Guess which one you're looking at? It'll never pass inspection.
  14. Hodmokrin

    Hodmokrin New Member

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    I'm not sure what you mean.

    I'm going to use the appropriate pipe type "connector" for the first floor connecting to exhaust on the stove.

    Then connect it to the ceiling insulator adapter where it becomes class A chimney.

    The class A chimney will continue through the open space on the second floor with appropriate guards around the pipe in the open space.Class A chimney will contine to the ceiling will it will be met with a vertical installation ceiling/attic/roof kit with all appropriate pieces and flashing. It will be 2 ft above the ridge of the roof.

    What am I missing here? Can you be SPECIFIC?
  15. jjs777_fzr

    jjs777_fzr Feeling the Heat

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    I don't want to get in between here the wrong way -

    but if what I read from your statement you will use appropriate piping and materials then it should be fine.
    What I mean is - if stove is installed on first floor and smoke pipe installed up to ceiling - to appropriate adapter where it transitions to CLASS A till it exits roof - then that sounds good.
    Lowes for example carries the very popular selkirk brand of CLASS A.
    Its going to get expensive for just the chimney alone but pricing at the box store is way cheaper than most mom and pop stores.
    So figure $89 per 36" CLASS A length pipes...and its gets pricey quick.
    Then buy the standard through the roof install kit which includes various shields etc and cap.
    You will need to know what pitch your roof is so you get appropriate flashing.

    You are lucky - in my state it is in fact illegal to put a solid fuel heating appliance in a 'garage'.

    EDIT - I believe if you have exposed CLASS A running through the second floor - it must be enclosed in a soffit or otherwise protected from being hit or damaged from impact.
  16. Hodmokrin

    Hodmokrin New Member

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    Thank you jjs77_fzr!

    There are some people that are rather helpful and friendly around here, and I appreciate it.

    There are also some who comment in a forum for people seeking help and advice who are scolding, condescending, rude, and unhelpful.... and will scare people away from a good forum like this one with their attitude.
  17. jjs777_fzr

    jjs777_fzr Feeling the Heat

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    Nawww don't take it that way - they are looking out for us all. Sometimes in 'print' things sound harsher then they are meant.
    I'm in no way blessing the install - but remember this.
    The town inspectors are generally approving a install that is done based on local codes AND the installation manual of the product.
    In other words...in my state you need to supply the selkirk install manual, the stove manual, while applying for the permit.
    If the install does not meet the manufacturers recommended install then they won't pass it.
    Like you I consider myself mechanically inclined - I definitely don't know everything - but please adhere to all clearances listed for the product you get.
    If you start safe then you are more inclined to stay safe with routine maintenance.
    BTW - have you considered a pellet stove instead ? I won't go into too many pros/cons but if you weigh the cost of a pellet stove and its associated (cheap) venting requirement versus a wood stove with class A pipe - then it gets interesting.
  18. weatherguy

    weatherguy Minister of Fire

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  19. DAKSY

    DAKSY Patriot Guard Rider Staff Member

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    I didn't read it that way, but if that's what you are planning to do, it is the correct way to do it. I read that you intended to run connector thru the first floor TO the Class A. I stand corrected.
    jjs777_fzr likes this.
  20. David Tackett

    David Tackett Member

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    Sorry, that is what I meant, I just used the wrong terminology.
  21. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    I've had good luck with prices and all parts arriving in good condition from www.dynamitebuys.com. Others report good deals at Menards if there is one in your area.
  22. webbie

    webbie Seasoned Moderator Staff Member

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    Not sure if this has been addressed, but if that garage is not a typical residential garage (cars stored, attached), then it very well may be classified as simply an outbuilding and would avoid the NFPA code about garages. That particular code item, IMHO, is meant to address the typical attached garage where cars, lawnmowers, etc. are stored...
  23. Lumber-Jack

    Lumber-Jack Minister of Fire

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    David I know that different areas have different code on garage installations, but in my area one of the codes concerning wood stoves in garage installations, in fact the only code that was different than regular house installation, was that the stove hearth had to be elevated 18" off the ground. The idea being that the extra elevation would help in case there was any flammable fumes on the ground, which is not that unlikely a scenario in a garage that might have cars parked in it.
    Personally I think an elevated hearth is a great idea, not only safer, it can also make it easier to feed the stove without bending down if you get it high enough, although I only went with an 18" rise in my garage hearth because I was limited in vertical clearance by my 8 ft ceiling. If you have a 10 ft ceiling you could go even higher if you wanted.
    David Tackett likes this.
  24. seaken

    seaken Minister of Fire

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    Another issue that may come up for some folks is the 7 foot rule. If you raise the stove on an 18" platform you will need at least 8-1/2 feet of ceiling height. If you have less than 7 feet from the hearth to the ceiling you may have to install using "Alcove" instructions. read the manual.
  25. seaken

    seaken Minister of Fire

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    Yes, sometimes we do get a little scolding. It's not meant to be unhelpful. But you have to remember that newbies often use the wrong terminology and do not explain themselves very well. Sometimes it's clear that a new poster has not used the search function and read upon the subject but just start asking questions without knowing what or how to ask.

    I believe Craig has a wiki on here and explains a lot of terms. I have read several posts already today where the terminology is incorrect. As a general note to all newbies: Take the time to learn the terminology and then draft your question using the best grammar and sentence structure you can. Use a word processor in another window and read and re-read your question and make sure it is clear. Once you have it in good shape use the cut and paste feature to enter it into the forum editor. Re-read it before you click "post".

    Communication is always a two way street. Maybe what you see as a bad attitude is simply a reaction to your own attitude. (I'm not saying you have a bad attitude. I'm only suggesting that attitude is hard to devine from a forum post and your own attitude may be slanting your opinion of the other guy's attitude)

    Finally, internet forums are not for the faint at heart. It's understandable that some might get scared off. But believe me, this place is like going to church! There are other places that get really scary!

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