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Installing interior/exterior stone veneer; is it a PITA?

Post in 'DIY and General non-hearth advice' started by sebois, Sep 5, 2011.

  1. sebois

    sebois Member

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    I'm thinking of covering my brick chimney inside the house and outside the roof with a stone veneer (also the lower 36" of the exterior of my house, but that is more of a dream than a plan). Although I have experience working on everything from wiring to cabinetry to sheetrocking, I have never worked with stone veneer installation.

    Does anyone have any experience with this stuff? Specifically, is it something I should contract out or is it reasonably easy to work with?

    ETA: This would be for aesthetics only; the wife just doesn't like the looks of brick.

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  2. firefighterjake

    firefighterjake Minister of Fire

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    I will be following this post as well . . . I have given some thought to putting up a stone veneer wall around my woodstove for the aesthetics . . . but no previous experience.
  3. JDC1

    JDC1 Feeling the Heat

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    We will be doing the same for behind the new woodstove. Based on the online videos, it doesnt look hard. I watched a crew do the exterior of a home and they make it look really easy.
  4. lukem

    lukem Minister of Fire

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    Those cast "stones" are really pretty easy to work with. I would assume they would be fine to go over existing brick, but I would check with the manufacturer as the coefficient of expansion between the brick and the stones may differ enough to pop them loose....but I HIGHLY doubt it.

    We did my BIL's gas fireplace hearth and chase (interior) with them and it was really easy...glue them up with liquid nails, let them sit, then grout them in. If you have any home repair skills, you can handle this job. Just plan it out and take your time. Get a masonry blade for an angle grinder for trimming and cutting.
  5. sebois

    sebois Member

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    From what I can see, it doesn't LOOK that difficult... I'll be using real stone veneers rather than cultured stone, so I don't know if I should use Liquid Nails or cement/grout.

    Is the use of LN more effective for heat distribution (and "pop-out" elimination)?
  6. gpcollen1

    gpcollen1 Minister of Fire

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    I would only use real stone too, as the fake stuff looks 'fake'. There is plenty of info for this in this forum and I am no expert but i do know that with real stone you are best off doing a scratch coat over the brick and then using mortar for attaching the stone.
  7. Trail_Time

    Trail_Time Member

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    I have been a big fan of Eldorado Stone. Huge selection. I have used it on 5 homes now. Looks real and I always get a lot of compliments. It is not hard to do, but can be time consuming especially if you are a perfectionist. I would stay away from dry stacking on your first project it is much more difficult. Do not use liquid nails. Mortar is not expensive and it works.

    Price out the materials and you can always get an installed price. On my most recent project (lot of stone) I paid someone else to do the work. It took 2 guys about 8 working days. Would have taken me longer. It really did not cost that much more and my time was worth more to me.

    If you have the time do it yourself. Nothing like looking at the finished project with a great sense of accomplishment.
  8. Trail_Time

    Trail_Time Member

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    Here is an example of Eldorado stone. This is one I did myself.

    Attached Files:

  9. sebois

    sebois Member

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    Thanks for the info - and that installation looks fantastic.

    Any tips on what I might need for tools (I'll be doing the interior first, so three-sided brick chimney, floor-to-ceiling, plus the hearth)?
  10. Trail_Time

    Trail_Time Member

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    Are you gong over existing brick everywhere?

    Won't need too much if so:

    Something to mix the mortar in (wheelbarrow)
    Pan to move the mortar to the work area.
    Notched trowel for scratch coat.
    pointed trowel for buttering stones
    Rock hammer/chisel
    Grout bag
    Optional diamond saw blade to cut stones where necessary

    Good instructions on Eldorado's website.

    http://www.eldoradostone.com/flashsite/
  11. ironpony

    ironpony Minister of Fire

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    for the size of the area you can definately do it yourself
    my wife and I stoned 3000 square feet outside of our house
    outdoor kitchen and inside fireplace over a two year period
    very time consuming and tedious on large areas
    definately use mortar and add a little lime to it to make it stickier
    grout as you go so you keep up on the grout process
    if you have to go back and grout alot at one time its not fun
    stick about 20 sq ft and then grout it and continue to stick stone and grout
    if its hot out dampen the wall so the moisture is not sucked out of the mortar to quickly
  12. Beardog

    Beardog Member

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    I've done a couple of veneers in the past, not all that difficult. Used flag stone and mortar. You will want to use wall ties as you go up as well. The last thing you want is to see your work on the ground.

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