Interesting Cinder Block Idea

Post in 'The Green Room' started by Vic99, Nov 22, 2011.

  1. Vic99

    Vic99
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  2. Hass

    Hass
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    Minister of Fire

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    indeed!
    I kept thinking about what happens when water mixes with it over a long period... I didn't hear them mention anything.
    It really reminds me of cellulose insulation.
     
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  3. begreen

    begreen
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    It looked like they were doing water absorption tests in the video. The bricks were soaking in a big vat.
     
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  4. EatenByLimestone

    EatenByLimestone
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    It's kind of like strawbale, but you could stack and finish them off easier. And fire retardant.

    Matt
     
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  5. GaryGary

    GaryGary
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    Hi,
    Thanks for finding that -- really interesting product.

    I talked to one of the folks at GreenstarBlox and got a bit more info.

    It seems to me the key advantage of this stuff over papercrete (which it basically is a form of) is that they 1) they save you the effort of making the blocks, 2) they use a precise recipe and process, so the blocks consistently meet a standard, and 3) they are planning to have building code approval for the blocks in early 2012.

    The cost is of course a lot higher than making papercrete, but it appears its very competitive cost wise with other wall building techniques.

    I think the building code approval is really a key item -- I'm guessing it would be very tough in most locations to get a papercrete house bought off by the local building department.

    I came away thinking that this was a really interesting product and it might be a great thing for an energy efficient, owner built home.

    My notes from the conversation are here: http://www.builditsolar.com/Projects/SolarHomes/GreenstarBlox/GreenstarBlox.htm

    Gary
     

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