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Introduction and a plea for help!!

Post in 'The Pellet Mill - Pellet and Multifuel Stoves' started by Jcannon, Oct 21, 2013.

  1. Jcannon

    Jcannon New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2013
    Messages:
    2
    Loc:
    N.E. Pa
    Hello everyone!

    You guys and gals have amassed an amazing amount of knowledge on this site! My wife and I just bought her grandparents farm house. It has a new roof, insulated attic, siding and windows, and we are still spending 800 a month in fuel oil for the house!

    A friend of ours gave us his QF Classic Bay 1200 insert when he upgraded this summer. I am running into problems with people not wanting to install it because it wasn't purchased from them. I have decided to do it myself! I am embracing country living and becoming a DIY'er. Very handy around an old house that needs everything! But I do have some questions!

    The chimney in the house currently has a 6" oval liner, but my stove is a 4" inch round (I believe). I haven't had any luck finding an adapter that is oval to round with a left offset (An offset would make it easier for install). So my questions are... 1) Anyone know if they can be found, bought and from where? 2) Can I run a length of 4 inch pipe inside of the existing liner?


    Thank you guys so much! I look forward to learning and sharing my knowledge!!

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  2. tjnamtiw

    tjnamtiw Minister of Fire

    Joined:
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    3,911
    Loc:
    North Georgia
    How tall is the chimney? Both of my stoves use flexible stainless pipe all the way up. There's a flat piece of galvanized steel sealed to the top of the chimney lining with roofing cement. A length of straight pipe is attached to that plate and the flexible pipe is screwed to the bottom of that. Then a cap is screwed onto the top of the pipe. You don't need straight pipe. Get the flexible. Much easier to get through the smoke shelf and to pull the stove out when you need to work on it or clean it at the end of the season. Look in the owner's manual for the EFL. With the pipe just going straight up with almost no bends, you probably can get away with 3" pipe, which makes life even easier. I have 17' of vertical chimney and 3" works great on both of mine.
  3. tjnamtiw

    tjnamtiw Minister of Fire

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  4. mtalea

    mtalea Feeling the Heat

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    Bristol, Connecticut
  5. PutnamJct

    PutnamJct Member

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    Loc:
    Putnam County NY
    I just did a flex liner on my 1200i. The exhaust outlet on the stove has a funky flange that you need to connect to a 3" to 4" adapter and go from there. I messed around with a lot of different adapters and attempts at getting it hooked up right. Save yourself a lot of aggravation, connect this to the flange on the stove (using hi-temp RTV) and you will now have a true 4" outlet on the stove end:
    http://www.woodstovepro.com/store/C...ser-Galvalume-3PVP-X4AD-3PVP-X4AD-p14826.html
    I connected this to the flex and all is good. With a true 4" outlet, you can make your piping decisions from there.
    John
    PS Stove seems to run much better with more heat now that I run a 4" exhaust instead of a 3". DK if I can scientifically prove that though LOL
    Last edited: Oct 22, 2013
  6. imacman

    imacman Guest

    Just run a 4" liner from the stove to the top of the chimney and add the proper cap. This is a place i've purchased stuff from in the past, and they are great to do business with, plus free shipping:

    http://www.dynamitebuys.com/store/cart.php?m=product_list&c=464

    Also, you can call Eric at Kinsman Stoves. He's a great guy, a forum member, and gives discounts to Hearth.com members....call the Brookfield store:

    www.kinsmanstoves.com
  7. tjnamtiw

    tjnamtiw Minister of Fire

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    Loc:
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    You're in NE Pa, so your altitude is not very high. Looking at the chart in your manual, you will see that for every two feet of vertical pipe, the equivalent feet is one. So, even if your chimney is 30 feet high, that's only 15 'equivalent' feet and you are WELL below the line where 4" pipe is needed. With the insert, everything is vertical and there are no horizontal bends or 90 degree angles.Unless you are sitting on top of a very high mountain, save yourself some money and hassle trying to snake 4" pipe up that small chimney and stay with 3" IMHO. Also, the 3" will probably draw better since it will stay warmer.
  8. mtalea

    mtalea Feeling the Heat

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    4" greater volume of air flow I would assume
  9. tjnamtiw

    tjnamtiw Minister of Fire

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    That's debatable (which seems to be a favorite pastime here ==c) because the air flow is set by the exhaust blower, not the size of tubing. While the 3" would have a little more restriction to flow, the warmer tubing might mitigate that with a higher draft. In any event, I KNOW that 3" piping works just fine for 17' vertical.
  10. Jcannon

    Jcannon New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2013
    Messages:
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    Loc:
    N.E. Pa
    Thank you guys so much!!! I have installed and fired it up tonight! I noticed a clunk after start up and noticed a heat tube fell down. So i will have to figure that out but so far it is warming the house right up !

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