is a pellet stove safe for the garage?

UpTheHill Posted By UpTheHill, Aug 12, 2008 at 7:59 PM

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  1. UpTheHill

    UpTheHill
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    Aug 12, 2008
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    did a search but couldn't find anything like this, sorry if this is the 100th question on this subject.

    I have a 2 1/2 car garage with a 1 bedroom guest house above it.
    the guest house has electric heat and a wood stove, the garage has nothing but plumbing.
    it is insulated and I was thinking of putting in a pellet stove set on low to keep everything from freezing and to add to the heat upstairs.

    in the winter the garage houses my pickup and a Kubota tractor.
    any danger with the pellet stove about 10 feet from the truck and tractor?

    TIA, Dave
     
  2. stoveguy2esw

    stoveguy2esw
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    per NFPA-211, 12.2.4 "solid fuel burning appiances shall not be installed in any garage"


    so for code reasons you cannot install a pellet stove in the garage.
     
  3. cac4

    cac4
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    why is that, anyway?

    (just curious. don't even have a garage)
     
  4. gpcollen1

    gpcollen1
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    Flame + gasoline appliances/vehicles = bad
     
  5. UpTheHill

    UpTheHill
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    it can't be that simple, since you are allowed to have a propane heater in a garage, and that has a flame.
    a propane heater must be at least 18 inches above the floor though.
     
  6. cac4

    cac4
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    my oil furnace has a flame, too. but it is more than 18 inches above the ground...

    I wonder if the "propane heaters" that are allowed are "catalytic heaters", which don't actually have a flame. (and, if I recall correctly, were actually invented for the purpose of heating "garages" (airplane hangars, actually) safely).
     
  7. billb3

    billb3
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    I don't think you can have a propane heater in an attached garage unless it is vented.
    Everyone I know with a natural gas heater in the garage it is mounted on the ceiling.


    The rules usually change with an Un-attached garage.


    Most of those portable propane space heaters have big warning stickers on them to use in well ventilated spaces and to open alll windows and doors, which is kinda dumb except they are local space heaters, they're not supposed to be heating a room, just a space. Even the tent heaters they warn you to leave windows and doors open.

    They also don't want solid fuel burning where vapors could collect on the floor. Some gasses sink. Many stoves have air intakes on the bottom. Boom.
     
  8. UpTheHill

    UpTheHill
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    so I guess I'll scratch that idea off my to do list for this winter, and stick with an electric heater of some sort.
    it's not like I want to bring the temps up to 70, just keep the pipes from freezing, which can be done with some heated tape i guess.
     
  9. webbie

    webbie
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    The garage codes have changed over the years.....it used to be that certain appliances - even wood furnaces - were allowed as long as they were elevated. Now they are not allowed at all as per NFPA.

    Even standard mechanical codes have addressed this...for various reasons. A central heater in a garage could, in theory, suck exhaust into your house. Other systems, like pellet stoves and wood stoves, would be too close to parked vehicles and other stored combustibles.
     
  10. drizler

    drizler
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    Well, electric rates being what they are in the NE you should be able to do better than that. Have you thought about one of those Coleman or Mr Heater propane radiants? I have used one for quite a while and it works pretty well. Mounts right on top of a bbq bottle and needs no electricity. Mine runs at between 10 and 35 K btu if I remember right. The small output is somewhat made up for by its portability. It comes in pretty handy when something is busted outside in the cold too. In a pinch it is enough to heat the house enough to keep it from freezing up at least. I just looked on ebay and see the only one like this listed is by Mr Heater. Here is the URL for that and it will give you the idea what I am talking about. Of course like any other heat appliance you have to have enough brains to turn it off when there are fumes present. Legal no but at least its not permanently mounted so no one has to know about it. Around here about half the garages seem to have wood stoves in them right or wrong. Personally I like the propane better anyways as it recovers faster when you open that huge door and all your heat takes a hike. http://cgi.ebay.com/Mr-Heater-28-000-BTU-Propane-Tank-Top-Radiant-Heater_W0QQitemZ130245339762QQihZ003QQcategoryZ159906QQssPageNameZWDVWQQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem
    Woops, read this again and I see your problem won't be solved by my idea. It's not something that you can leave unattended. Probably some sort of modine heater is all you can use for long term heat like you want.
     
  11. Redox

    Redox
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    Methinks the key word here is "solid fuel". In the event of a fuel spill, you will not be able to put out the flame fast enough. Oil and gas can be shut down almost instantly, thus are marginally safer. Anything that uses inside air for combustion is a potential problem, but could be improved with an outside air kit. An unventer heater is probably worse than a vented stove due to the possibility of CO, but are allowed in some jurisdictions. I personally wouldn't want to use anything that falls in this "gray area". YMMV

    Chris
     
  12. kinsmanstoves

    kinsmanstoves
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    Good call Mike.

    Always check with your local zoning and or insurance agent. They would also be able to tell you before you spend hard earned money on a purchase and or install.

    Eric
     
  13. lvfd50

    lvfd50
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    I'm wondering what the "code" is for a work shop that is in a garage. I currently have a pellet stove in the house I just purchased and will be switching to a woodstove in about a year, been burning wood for a while and still have a stock pile. I was thinking about using the pellet stove with the outside air kit to heat my shop. The shop happens to be located in a garage, but is separated by a wall and a door to the parking side of the garage. Also the garage is a detached one. Does anyone know what the "code" would be with this? Does it make a difference if you use an OAK compared to not?
     
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