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Is anybody familiar with a Washington Stove Works Olympic-Crest????

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by BikeMedic2709, Sep 6, 2006.

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  1. BikeMedic2709

    BikeMedic2709 New Member

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    I am attempting a rebuild of this stove. It has been a daunting task so far. This is my first rebuild. I can find little to no info on this stove. Any help would be wonderful.
    How much stove cement should be used at the joints? How do you know when there is enough cement on the joint? Just goop it on and scrape off the excess? Like I said, I am new to rebuilding stoves. Thought I would give it a try as opposed to spending the money on a new stove. (Strict budget.)
    Any suggestions on door handles? The doors have the cast part with a threded rod sticking out of them, and the handles are more than gone. I have attempted making hardwood handles, but these dry and crack off in a few months. I am looking for a better solution.

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  2. webbie

    webbie Seasoned Moderator Staff Member

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    That stove is almost an exact copy of a Vermont Castings Defiant (original one), so if you can get ahold of the rebuild manual on that stove, it may help. Try Black Swan Stoves in CT (google them).

    Most of the stuff is common sense. Better more furnace cement than less, although you have to clean the excess from places where it shows on the outside of the stove.

    The handles will always get hot. That is why VC and other stove makers went to removeable handles....something like a tube that could be put over the threads (assuming the threads are already at a 90 degree to the latch shaft.
  3. elkimmeg

    elkimmeg Guest

    Having just rebuilt a Defiant encore and a Resolute Acclaim I apply a generous amount of refactory cement to both sides of the joint
    using my finger I smooth off the joit inside and scrape and wet rag the excess out side. It is possible to re-seam joints without disessembly. by re caulking both the inside and outside of existing cast iron joints. . If you have already taken apart the seams then scrape off all the old cement wire brush them then slightly damp wet rag both sided before applying the refactory caulk If you stage has gone pass this I remove the top I use a ratchet banding strap first to hold the rest of tha cast sides and back in position
    I used wood spacers inside. All this to avoid complete rebuilding but acccess to all major joints I have rebuilt a few stoves the past 3 years I hope these tips are helpfull I also made up my own handles Using Bazillian Mahonagy turned in my lathe
  4. BikeMedic2709

    BikeMedic2709 New Member

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    Thanks (again) Elk!!
    It turned out to be a complete rebuild. I reduced the stove to pieces. Wire brushed and cleaned as best as I could. Then began the rebuilding process.
    I did exactly what you mentioned; using a ratchet type load binding strap. It worked very well! Excellent advice. Wish I would have asked this question 3 days ago. I would have had a much easier time!
    The stove looks great with the new paint.I am now extremely satisfied with the self reliance and money savingaspects of a rebuild.
    It is nice to know that I can add the cement after the fact if need be!

    Have you ever had them "leak" after a rebuild? What did you do?
  5. elkimmeg

    elkimmeg Guest

    There are places and positions one cannot get a caulking gun at rubber glove and a finger loaded with refactory cement does the trick
    If you read my past post then its time for th light leak test. If you find a leak the squeeze tube or loaded finger trick will work.
    who cares if a little excess appears inside the stove as long as it is sealed. glad to have helped
  6. BikeMedic2709

    BikeMedic2709 New Member

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    How long should I wait until I fire the stove? It has been 4 days. I think I may have to do the ol' goop-up-the-finger & slather-it-on trick... Oh well. I am pretty jazzed at my first rebuild!
  7. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    With furnace cement the sooner you heat cure it the better. I try to fire whatever I have applied it to within twenty four hours. Heat curing drives out the water that is in cement that keeps it pliable during storage and use. In the case of a stove rebuild a low fire for an hour or so will also start the paint curing process. All of this is better if you have the stove outside for the curing fires.

    Start a low, less than 200 degree, fire for an hour or so. Let is cool back down and then do a second one keeping it low for an hour or so and then gradually increase the temp.

    Also, driving out the water in the cement as soon as possible gets it out of contact with that cast iron where it will just sit there and cause rust in the joints.
  8. BikeMedic2709

    BikeMedic2709 New Member

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    Again, I wished I would have asked these questions sooner. I took the stove apart. took everything outside, where I wire brushed eveything. Then I took everything back to the hearth where I reassembled it. Due to the size and weight of this stove. (I don't know exactly how much the stove weighs; but it is heavy.)
    Will it hurt that I have not fired it? I was thinking that by waiting I was allowing it to "cure" so to speak.
    Thank BB!
  9. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    Nah. Just open the doors and windows when you are firing it. It will be fine. I am assuming you repainted everything and that is what is gonna smell bad.
  10. BikeMedic2709

    BikeMedic2709 New Member

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    MooHaaahaaaaaahaaa...Ahhhhaaa ahhaahaahaahahaaaaaa!!!!

    My wife would love that!
  11. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    "But honey, that is the same smell you get from starting up a brand new stove. And that would have cost us $2,500."
  12. BikeMedic2709

    BikeMedic2709 New Member

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    Again.. Mooohahahahahhhhhaaaaaaahaaaahaaahaaahaaa Ahhhhahhhhaahaaaahaaaaaaa!

    I will probably have to use that line anyway. I painted the stove, too. I am sure it is going to smell nice. If nothing else I will have the house to myself that day!
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