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Is this Squire big enough for our house?

Post in 'Classic Wood Stove Forums (prior to approx. 1993)' started by Berrley, Oct 25, 2011.

  1. Berrley

    Berrley Member

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2011
    Messages:
    6
    Loc:
    Middle TN
    I am trying to find out if a Squire insert we recently picked up for cheap is big enough for our house or if we should hold out for something bigger. I do not know exactly which model it is, but it is either model 51000 or 53000. It has both model numbers on the back with check boxes in front of them, but neither is checked. The serial number is 27796. The outside dimensions from the widest points are 29 1/2"W x 23"T x 20 1/2"D. The opening measures 18 1/2"W x 10"T. And it has a blower.
    Now about our house: The area we are heating (supplementally) is about 1500 sq./ft. all on one level. I recently tore out the firebox to our fireplace in order to install an insert, and the dimensions to the hole in the fireplace where we can put an insert are 42"W x 32"T x 21"D. So there is plenty of room for a larger insert, but the Squire that we picked up is quite nice and inexpensive. But we also do not want to skimp.
    Does anyone know the square footage this stove would be rated for? Thanks.

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  2. mellow

    mellow Resident Stove Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2008
    Messages:
    3,129
    Loc:
    Salisbury, MD
    Squire inserts are nice, but they are old outdated burning appliances. If it was me I wouldn't install it as it will need to be burned at high temps to keep from creating creosote in your chimney. Most of them were installed by just pushing them into the fireplace and starting a fire, if you are going to install it you will need to make sure you have at least 15ft of chimney and you need to install an insulated chimney liner.

    You will need to get a rectangle to round boot adapter to put on top of the insert to mate it to the 6" round stainless steel liner.

    The stove will heat 1500 sq easy, but will eat wood like no tomorrow.

    It also sounds like you have a zero clearence fireplace, this would not be approved for that kind of install.

    Post some pictures of your setup.

    Does your Squire look like this?

    Attached Files:

  3. Berrley

    Berrley Member

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2011
    Messages:
    6
    Loc:
    Middle TN
    Yes, that is exactly what our Squire looks like, only with a bit of a smaller trim kit.
    Here is a picture of the space I am working with and what it looked like before. It had a stone facing on it that was pulling away from the wall, so I disassembled it all and after we find a suitable insert, I will be framing around it for a new, lighter weight stone face. The masonry looks really bad, but I had it inspected and it is sound, just sloppy.
    With what you said about Squires being inefficient, would the same be for any older stove? How do you feel about Buck model 26000? I see a lot of those for sale. Our budget allows for either a new, inexpensive stove from somewhere like Northern Tool, or a used, trusted name brand. We've been told that we are better off getting a good condition, used quality stove. What is your opinion?
    Thanks.

    Attached Files:

  4. mellow

    mellow Resident Stove Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2008
    Messages:
    3,129
    Loc:
    Salisbury, MD
    First thing you will have to factor in getting your chimney lined, that is going going to cost around $600 if you do it yourself, maybe more depending on your chimney height. With the looks of that chimney I would not burn in it without an insulated liner for safety reasons, even if it has been passed by inspectors.

    Sadly, you are going to pay dearly for a stove this time of year that is worth burning in, any stove that is a newer EPA certified stove will fit the bill. Old Bucks and Squires are just big steel boxes that do not have any type of secondary combustion technology and you will eat through wood like no tomorrow.

    If that is your only choices as long as you hook it up to a liner and burn hot and clean your liner monthly to prevent creosote buildup you could make it through the winter, hopefully you already have at least 2 cords of Seasoned wood ready to go.

    Other people might tell you it is ok to just put that Squire insert in and start burning, but it is not, take it from someone who has had 2 chimney fires and almost burnt my house down to come to that realization.

    You have done a lot of work on that chimney, finish it out right.

    The only stove I would buy from a big box store would be an Englander.

    http://www.overstockstoves.com/50tnc13i--epa-certified-noncatalytic-wood-stove--1550131500.html

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