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jotul 602 rebuild

Post in 'Classic Wood Stove Forums (prior to approx. 1993)' started by bulldog, Mar 3, 2011.

  1. bulldog

    bulldog New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2011
    Messages:
    4
    Loc:
    Northern Mn.
    Hello, I'm new to the forum and would like some opinions on rebuilding an older Jotul 602 (early 70's I think). It was in a cabin we bought last year and when I fired it for the first time, everything looked OK until I got up late that night to put more wood in I could see light coming out from around the front of the door frame (not the door itself) along the verticle edge where it meets the side. Are there gaskets along that corner or would stove cement work AND if it is warped (it appears to be slightly), at what point does it make sense to not fool with it. The rest of the stove is in pretty good condition...the top baffle, the inside side plates etc. Anything on this stove that I should look out for? Thanks

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  2. Fsappo

    Fsappo Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2008
    Messages:
    3,878
    Loc:
    Central NY
    Never rebuilt a 602, but I've done a bunch of other cast iron stoves. Normally its just a matter of nuts, bolts, cement and putting stuff back together in the right order. Cleaning the joints real good is a must. You may be able to find rebuild instructions thru a Jotul dealer.
  3. bulldog

    bulldog New Member

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    Mar 3, 2011
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    4
    Loc:
    Northern Mn.
    It does look to be a fairly straight forward process of dismantling and some input that I got elsewhere said to put a strap around it before removing the top to keep everything from falling apart. I've got an older VC Intrepid II (1308) in a different cabin that I'll be trying to sell and I'm thinking maybe I'll swap the two and keep the VC and leave the Jotul as is.
  4. defiant3

    defiant3 Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2010
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    408
    Loc:
    No. NH
    Unlike the Intrepid, a 602 is all bolted together so really no need for strap. 602 is like the easiest stove ever to rebuild, and the question is "why not?" Oh, I know; the back! The backs of those guys have a nasty habit of cracking, so have a look back there. Otherwise, fix it, use it!! A replacement back might be available from Woodman's Parts Plus though, should you need one. Happy Heating!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
  5. bulldog

    bulldog New Member

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    Mar 3, 2011
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    4
    Loc:
    Northern Mn.
    Thanks again, I haven't been out to look at the stove since we closed it up for winter but I'll take a real close look at the back with a strong light inside the next time I'm out there. I will more likely rebuild it even if I swap it out unless there's damage. I wouldn't feel right selling a small cabin with a bad stove in it. The VC I bought 11 years ago was used, but I'm betting no more than 6 or 7 cords have been burned in it. The cat's in great shape and it has the usual chips in the enamel but it really heats nice. Found a dead squirrel in it once between uses and in an effort to get out he pulled out the gasket between the top and primary air lever control. I take it that a wire wheel on a drill will sufice in cleaning the joints to be cemented or are there residue cleaners that are used?
  6. webbie

    webbie Seasoned Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2005
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    12,381
    Loc:
    Western Mass.
    The 602 is a simple enough stove to probably be fixed without taking it apart.

    If you clean the joints well on the inside and dampen them...and then use your fingers (gloved if you like) to squash black furnace cement into them, you will likely be able to do a decent repair.
  7. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    49,112
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    Agreed, the front seams are easy to reach without dismantling the stove. Check to be sure the front frame is still straight and not warping or cracked.

    Given the age of the stove, it would be good to check all seams. In a darkened room, take a bright light and put it in the stove, close the door as best as possible. The carefully examine all the seams for any light leaks. If you find several, then it may be time for a rehab. I did this in a few hours. It's a very simple stove to rebuild.
  8. bulldog

    bulldog New Member

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    Mar 3, 2011
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    Loc:
    Northern Mn.
    Sound advice and a great website.....enough said....I'll get the cement and get to work.

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