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Just picked up new project an old timberline wood stove any info on this make would be great!

Post in 'Classic Wood Stove Forums (prior to approx. 1993)' started by 716Auto, Oct 1, 2013.

  1. 716Auto

    716Auto New Member

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    Just picked a older timberline wood stove up and haven't found much info on them. If anyone know general info on them it be great! Thanks

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  2. pen

    pen There are some who call me...mod. Staff Member

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    Is it a single door or a double door unit?

    Have any pictures?

    Is there any information that you need in particular?
  3. 716Auto

    716Auto New Member

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    I will post some pics tonight. But its a double door with a forest and mountain landscape embossed into it. I was just inquiring on the stove its self, quality,heat output reliability and what to look out. Thanks!
  4. mellow

    mellow Resident Stove Connoisseur

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    Cracks, holes, signs of general abuse in its 30+ year lifespan. They throw good heat but will eat wood like tomorrow, I would make sure the firebrick is good and then install a baffle on it, some came with a basic baffle.
  5. Beetle-Kill

    Beetle-Kill Minister of Fire

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    Good stove, solid, heavy as heck but good welds. Add a gasket to the opening, not the doors, it will help a bunch. If you want to go to secondary-air for a long and clean burn, PM me and I'll send pictures of what I did. It wasn't tough and for a project stove, definitely worth the effort. Mine was a double-door with the mountain casting also. "Coaly" has some additional information on these stoves. JB
    pen likes this.
  6. Indiana farmer

    Indiana farmer New Member

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    I have a Timberline we bought in the late 1970's. It has heated our chalet all these years. I am debating whether to buy a more efficient stove or stay with the old Timberline. Our's is the largest model with double doors and a simple baffle. The baffle warps after time. I just take it out; flatten it out with a sledge hammer, and put it back in the stove.
  7. Indiana farmer

    Indiana farmer New Member

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    Our old Timberline (bought it in the late 1970's does not use that much wood (about four cords in an average winter) since we did a major insulation and metal roofing job on our chalet. We are debating the advantages of replacing it with a more efficient stove (like a Vermont Castings Defiant).
  8. Beetle-Kill

    Beetle-Kill Minister of Fire

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    Gotta ask, Indiana farmer- can you weld?

    A little metal, a little welding, a little drill-press work, and a few hours of work = long, clean burns for minimal cost.
    If that interests you, PM me, you'll save some coin. Just say'in. JB
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2013
  9. Indiana farmer

    Indiana farmer New Member

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    Here is a picture of our set-up. At this point, it looks like we are going to stay with the old Timberline, at least for this winter. The Vermont Castings stoves are beautiful, and it is likely they are more efficient, but they do not appear to be very heavy duty. Our Timberline has been heating our chalet for about 35 years.
    I would like to see what your add-on looks like.

    Attached Files:

    tfdchief and billb3 like this.
  10. coaly

    coaly Fisher Moderator Staff Member

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    For company history start with the Fisher Stove Story. (available on this site) There is a lot about Calvin and Joice Cotton in it. He is related to the Moore's that had the Pennsylvania Fisher fabricator license and lost his license to build Fishers by copying the stoves he was to be building. Started in Idaho, later bought NY license and moved east to run the Fisher plant there. He then became Timberline. (with patent infringement suits)

    Use the search feature at the top of page and search "Cal Cotton" for more information.
  11. Indiana farmer

    Indiana farmer New Member

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    Thank you for all the information. We are debating a new stove, but we are "afraid" we will miss the ambiance of the old Timberline (560 pounds). Another nice thing: we can put anything in the old stove: stumps, huge logs that cannot be split, and it will hold a nice fire all night: no matter how cold. Also, our rat terrier likes to sleep under the stove.

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