1. Welcome Hearth.com Guests and Visitors - Please enjoy our forums!
    Hearth.com GOLD Sponsors who help bring the site content to you:
    Hearthstone Soapstone and Cast-Iron stoves( Wood, Gas or Pellet Stoves and Inserts)

Just talked with Fred Seton ..

Post in 'The Boiler Room - Wood Boilers and Furnaces' started by patch53, Dec 29, 2009.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. NNYorker

    NNYorker Member

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2008
    Messages:
    245
    Loc:
    Upstate N.Y.
    Good idea with the board. How about a mod on your idea -- use a screw drive similar to a garage door type to move an aggressive scraper/cleaner back and forth with a stop at the end of the vessel (where it starts to 90). Drive it with your 1/2" drill or ratchet..... Probably never hold up to the heat--just throwing ideas out there.

    Helpful Sponsor Ads!





  2. Jesse-M

    Jesse-M Member

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2008
    Messages:
    191
    Loc:
    Columbia City, IN
    Cut it in half and weld a handle on it you'll have a custom fit scraper.
  3. Jesse-M

    Jesse-M Member

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2008
    Messages:
    191
    Loc:
    Columbia City, IN
    Two aluminum cans a week.
  4. NNYorker

    NNYorker Member

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2008
    Messages:
    245
    Loc:
    Upstate N.Y.

    I used the Rutlands too with results similar to yours. I did not have a mixing valve but a temp gauge in a well directly behind the unit. Not as foolproof as the mixer but I could monitor my return temps. I still use it with my Econo in the same location. Never tried the the Chimney sweep. The Rutlands is not that expensive--I've seen where Tractor Supply and Home Depot will drastically reduce prices on this at the end of the season
  5. Gooserider

    Gooserider Mod Emeritus

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2006
    Messages:
    6,737
    Loc:
    Northeastern MA (near Lowell)
    My understanding has always been that the mixing valve or loading units, etc. were never really intended as a creosote prevention method, that any benefit of that sort was just a good news side effect... The reason I've always seen given for doing return water protection was to prevent condensation of corrosive combustion gases on the boiler interior, especially right near the return water connection... If condensation was allowed, it would cause the steel in the area to corrode, the corrosion would flake off exposing fresh steel, repeating until the HX rusted out from the firebox side in... By getting the boiler HX up to temperature as rapidly as possible, the condensation would be kept to a minimum, and driven off before it could do a lot of damage...

    Gooserider
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page