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Just thinking ahead

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by Nixon, Feb 6, 2013.

  1. Nixon

    Nixon Minister of Fire

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    This spring (and when weather allows) ,we'll be finishing the processing of a load of oak , and a load of BL . It's basically two triable loads of poles. Now to my question for the resident haorders..... Do we wait 'til all of it is stacked to order a mixed load ( cherry,maple..... ) ? Or, leave a bit of the oak and Locust to mix with the newer load. I'm kind of leaning towards the latter option . Basically , I'm trying to avoid using oak and locust during the shoulder seasons as it would be a waste . Opinions , plans ,ideas , and suggestions welcomed .

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  2. Gasifier

    Gasifier Minister of Fire

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    I am still learning that is seems better to keep the wood seperated if you have room. When things get cold you want the best btus you can get your hands on. And the shoulder season wood to be seperate. I have had to move a little shoulder season wood, luckily not very far, but had to move it still. This was so I could get to the good stuff of Ash and Cherry I wanted.
    dzych2 and Nixon like this.
  3. Nixon

    Nixon Minister of Fire

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    As I tend to do , I could have worded things better :) My concern is that I'll have a lot of Oak and Locust either "seasoned " ,or in the process of getting there ,but very little mixed (shoulder season . ) .I've got what amounts to 2 years worth of it ,but I'd like to come up with a plan to get much further ahead . The reason being is that I'm really feeling the years ,and I want to make hay while the sun still shines .
  4. Ralphie Boy

    Ralphie Boy Minister of Fire

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    I keep most wood types separate. Makes it easier it develop "gourmet" loads for all types of weather.;)
    Nixon and milleo like this.
  5. fabsroman

    fabsroman Minister of Fire

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    Yep, keep it separate. I am spending time/energy dealing with poplar mixed with oak. My dad decided to stack it for me in 2011 when I did not have the time to do it, and he put the poplar with the red oak. Well, the poplar is at 19% or less and ready to burn right now, which is good because I need something other than the black locust (debatable as to whether that is what it is) I had been planning on using since it is coming back at 37% and burning like crap. Problem is the red oak mixed with the poplar is 24% to 25%, and I could stand to wait until next year to burn it. So, I went through one stack so far and separated. Nothing quite as fun as having to go through a stack and then re-stack some of it. Good news is that it was mostly poplar so there wasn't quite as much oak to re-stack. Bad news is that there wasn't quite as much oak.

    Once I finish getting all the wood I need this spring, everything is going to be oak except for 2 cords of "black locust" so I shouldn't have any problems figuring out what I am going to burn. Pretty much going to be oak all the time.
    Nixon likes this.
  6. Locust Post

    Locust Post Minister of Fire

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    I would keep the oak separate but if you want to mix the locust in that would be fine. BUT I had a lot of locust mixed in the pile I am working on and I keep moving it aside and burning the other stuff unless I need an extremely long burn or it is really cold. I just know that locust (most of what was dead and barkless when I cut it) will be just as good next year or the following decade.
    ScotO and Nixon like this.
  7. bogydave

    bogydave Minister of Fire

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    I have 2 types of wood , birch & spruce.
    I keep them separated . If needed I put some of each in the inside woodbox
    to mix or burn spruce in the day & birch thru the night.
    With several choices, I'd keep the low, medium & high BTU woods seperated.
    Can always mix if needed when burning.
    Nixon likes this.
  8. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    What would worry me is the oak. It won't be good for next year. So I'd get the mixed load just as soon as possible and also get it split and stacked as soon as possible. Even that will be marginal for next winter. Stack it loose; don't try to stack it tight and make it look really neat. It needs air going through the stack; lots of air. And yes, I would separate those types of wood. Cherry may be fine for early fall and it depends upon what kind of maple it is. Soft maple would be no problem. Hard maple will be marginal.
    midwestcoast and Nixon like this.
  9. midwestcoast

    midwestcoast Minister of Fire

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    I'm with Sav, if you need something for next year I'd get a load of fast drying woods delivered, split & stacked ASAP.
    Otherwise I'd get the Oak & Locust stacked separate, wait 'till your back recovers & then work on the next load.
    I would rather have all my wood separated by species, but don't have the room, so I just try to keep it stacked by when it'll be ready to burn and keep shoulder season stuff separate from the best stuff. This means oak always gets stacked alone & maybe a year or so later I stack some shoulder wood on top of it.
    BTW if you really want shoulder season wood don't be afraid to go with lighter woods than Cherry and Maple. Basically I'd buy whatever is the cheapest, or free. Soft Maple, Pine, Poplar, whatever is abundant & unwanted in your area.
    Jon1270, TimJ and Nixon like this.
  10. PapaDave

    PapaDave Minister of Fire

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    I tend to keep things separate. I usually put the fall shoulder stuff up front in the shed, calculate roughly when I'll get to the spring shoulder wood, and put that back a little farther.
    The oak is the rest.
    The first 3 years or so, I struggled just to get the oak ready. I should have adopted the shoulder wood plan sooner. >>
    chvymn99, TimJ and Nixon like this.
  11. Nixon

    Nixon Minister of Fire

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    Dennis, just re-read this . I'm at least 4-5 years ahead right now if I don't process another stick of wood . Just trying to think ahead ,and manage the various wood types so that I'm not wasting the really primo wood during the shoulder season . Seems like I'll have to deliver some dreaded news to My wife ."We need another wood shed ! Dennis said so (kinda ) " !
  12. Locust Post

    Locust Post Minister of Fire

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    Just start building it Nixon......easier to beg forgiveness than ask permission.
  13. Nixon

    Nixon Minister of Fire

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    Been married to the wonderful wife for 35+ years . That particular theory has been proven wrong many times here ! :) She has a concealed carry permit , 2 chainsaws ,and a Black belt in Yoshukai Karate . :)
    Backwoods Savage and chvymn99 like this.
  14. Locust Post

    Locust Post Minister of Fire

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    Congrats on the years Nix that's the way it should be. So what your saying is "There's an old sheriff in town" (not callin her old don't want to tangle with that)
  15. Nixon

    Nixon Minister of Fire

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    She's as good as they get .She'll work as hard as anyone I know ,likes the same things as I do ,gave me a great Daughter ,and thinks getting a chainsaw as a birthday present is great . (Anniversary ,Valentines Day, and Christmas are another matter :) ) . As a matter of fact , She'll be getting a set a Ruby ear rings for Valentines Day . She was really looking at them hard a while ago . It's either that ,or a new vacuum cleaner :) :)
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  16. BobUrban

    BobUrban Minister of Fire

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    everyone has their own plan as to how or if they separate wood in the stacks. I stack it by drying time and just cut good stuff as much as available and don't worry about shoulder vs. deep winter wood. Being 3+ years ahead my ash, cherry, elm and maple all goes together and burns together. I do keep the oak separate due to it taking so long to dry - beyond that it goes in as a cocktail and seems to work well for me in mid-Michigan. If I had a significant amount of osage or locust I would likely keep it separate for the really cold spells like the one the we recently had - just seems to make sense.
    Backwoods Savage and Nixon like this.
  17. Locust Post

    Locust Post Minister of Fire

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    I got a good one too Nix. I think I would stick with the ruby ear rings....course you know that by now.
  18. osagebow

    osagebow Minister of Fire

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    I am making a few mixed stacks based on drying time also, mixing sass and maple in with my PITA to light locust to finish next year's supply. I have some oak in the works that i'll stack in the woods for at least three years with some Hick thrown in. About 2 cords of live, easy to get to locust on my road and more shoulder stuff is a "stategic reserve" In case i get banged up or the truck dies.;)
    Nixon likes this.
  19. nate379

    nate379 Guest

    I stack all mixed, I'm not fussy. Mostly birch but some cottonwood and spruce mixed in.

    Just don't do like me and count on having 4 cords of birch ready to go only to realize that it's 75% cottonwood. :eek: For as crap as that wood is, actually hasn't been too bad for me. Have only burned about 1.75 cords so far.
    Nixon likes this.
  20. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    Hang on to her Nixon. Also please remind me of these things should I ever stop for a visit.
    Shane N and Nixon like this.
  21. Nixon

    Nixon Minister of Fire

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    :) that's not the issue ! Some day she may wake up and ask herself "This Turkey has spent this much for saws ,etc to save this much on heat , is it worth it ? Should I keep him around , or ............ "
    That, and if she ever got wind of the dilemma that I went through when Master Mech posted the 038 Mag thread . :) My survival instinct kicked in ,but it was close !
    So, I'm just a lucky man to have such a brilliant bride ,even though her ability to judge character has been call to question several times by her family and friends .
    As to You ,or for that matter ,anyone visiting , I'd be honored . Body armor ,and first aid kits are recommended if you don't call before hand . :) :)
    swagler85 and Backwoods Savage like this.
  22. Paulywalnut

    Paulywalnut Minister of Fire

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    This is just another thing I do that people question my sanity.
    I keep all my wood varieties seperate. Rotating old and new stuff coming in.;)
  23. ScotO

    ScotO Guest

    I pretty much have three side by side stacks going on in my hoard.....one entire stack is pretty much dedicated to the really good stuff (honey locust, black locust, elm, white oak, red oak, hickory). The other two stacks are the rest of the local hardwoods (cherry, ash, soft and hard maple, walnut, etc). I bring some of each stack into the basement, using the really good stuff for long burns or overnighters, and using the 'lesser' woods for daytime burning.......
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