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Location for Probe Thermometer

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by lumbering on, Feb 18, 2013.

  1. lumbering on

    lumbering on Feeling the Heat

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    I want to install a probe thermometer. My chimney connector has a pre-drilled hole about 6 inches from the collar.

    1. Is this hole designed for a probe thermometer. If not, what is it there for, and can I use it anyway?

    2. Is it too close to the stove to get accurate readings? (I'm reading most people have theirs at 18" but my masonry chimney would prevent that.

    Please see picture below.

    Thanks in advance.
    photo.JPG

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  2. pen

    pen There are some who call me...mod. Staff Member

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    That's a double wall connector?

    Are you using any other thermometers currently on the stove top or pipe?

    pen
  3. lumbering on

    lumbering on Feeling the Heat

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    I honestly don't know if it is a double wall connector. I'm having a "second opinion" overview of the whole set up when I get it swept this spring.

    No thermometers yet.
  4. pen

    pen There are some who call me...mod. Staff Member

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  5. Highbeam

    Highbeam Minister of Fire

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    Probe meters are for double wall pipe. If that is not double wall than a regular magnetic surface meter is the right thing.

    In an insert type installation, this location might be the best you can do. Obviously you want to be able to see the dial and you only have a short section of pipe to work with. Condar instructs you to install the meter at 18" it's not some random height, it is dictated. Yes, you may get high readings closer or you may get some effect on the probe from the stove itself but I use my probe meter so much that it would be worth these drawbacks. Put the probe as high as possible while still being able to read it.
    soupy1957 and Jon1270 like this.
  6. lumbering on

    lumbering on Feeling the Heat

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    I just ordered a stove top thermo.

    It's a bit tricky with the chimney, but how low can I put a magnetic surface thermo on the pipe and still get accurate readings?

    And what is that hole there for anyway?
  7. Highbeam

    Highbeam Minister of Fire

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    Looks like a predrilled screw hole.
  8. pen

    pen There are some who call me...mod. Staff Member

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    If it is single wall and you use a magnetic, you'll get accurate readings no matter where you put it. The only thing that may be off is the "optimal" zone that is marked on the thermometer since that correlates to a higher position on the stove pipe.

    For example, if you place it there you may find that the thermometer has 450 as your "redline" you'll have to mentally adjust that for being located closer to the stove.

    pen
  9. soupy1957

    soupy1957 Minister of Fire

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    +1to Highbeam's response. 18 inches from the top of the stove is the recommended distance. It's where I drilled and installed mine a few years ago (double wall flue pipe), and it has become the thermostat that I use most of all, for gauging temp..

    Condar recommends replacement every two years, by the way.

    -soupy1957
  10. lumbering on

    lumbering on Feeling the Heat

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    Should I plug up that hole, then?
  11. pen

    pen There are some who call me...mod. Staff Member

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    If it's single wall pipe, and it's leading into the stove pipe (where the flue gasses are) with no use, then yes, plug it.
  12. lumbering on

    lumbering on Feeling the Heat

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    What would you use to plug it?
  13. pen

    pen There are some who call me...mod. Staff Member

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    I've used an allen plug before, but that's only because I had a few around. Otherwise, a short metal screw of the right size is fine.

    BTW, what the heck did that turn out to be? Is it single or double wall? My guess would be single, but you haven't said.

    You should be able to stick something in that hole to help. If it doesn't lead into the area where gasses are present, don't worry about plugging it.

    pen
  14. lumbering on

    lumbering on Feeling the Heat

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    Still don't know for sure. I think single.
    How would I tell?

    (don't get me started on asking the installer)
  15. pen

    pen There are some who call me...mod. Staff Member

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    I'd be taking a flashlight and a piece of wire and sticking it in that hole to feel around / inspect.

    You won't hurt anything doing that.

    pen
  16. Highbeam

    Highbeam Minister of Fire

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    You also won't hurt anything by plugging it, nomatter if it is single wall or double wall.

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