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Locust Drying Time Question

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by Zzyk, Dec 17, 2008.

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  1. Zzyk

    Zzyk New Member

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    I was experimenting with my wood selection as I suddenly realized most of my seasoned wood is not as seasoned as my new stove would like. The soft maple and cherry is great, but the sugar maple, ironwood, and red oak doesn't seem quite ready. This wood was cut and split 12-18 months ago. For comparison, locust from 6-8 months ago seems more dry.

    Anybody know if locust is a fast drying wood and how long it takes (I'm planning for next year)? I have access to plenty more and I'm hoping to target wood that will dry reasonably well by next season.

    Thanks
    Chris

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  2. savageactor7

    savageactor7 Minister of Fire

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    Locust is pretty dense wood I give it a couple summers or split it really small. ie a 6" round would get quartered.

    Very surprising your other wood isn't ready.
  3. gzecc

    gzecc Minister of Fire

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    I am burning Blk Locust as I type. It has been sittin outside under a top cover for less than a year. It is still very heavy although it is burning well. I think locust needs a year. Red oak and sugar need 18mos.
    Locust is one of the heaviest woods when dry. Thats why its so high in BTU's.
  4. JerseyWreckDiver

    JerseyWreckDiver New Member

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    I won't disagree completely about the oak but I am right now burning the Sugar Maple I split in late spring, came down green and sat for a bit before I got to it. I did take the extra step of taking the bark off it to speed things up a bit but it is dry as a bone.
  5. Cluttermagnet

    Cluttermagnet Minister of Fire

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    I've heard various different opinions regarding Locust seasoning times. I have some which is no older than a year or so. An entire tree got pushed over to get at a septic system. It laid around several months, not in contact with the ground. Then I began cutting rounds and splitting, earlier this past summer. I'll know better after the end of this heating season, but I suspect that smaller splits are usable 'same year' if the wood gets split early in the year. One thing for sure- smaller, dead branches are ready to go, and burn very well indeed. I really like Locust a lot- hot burning, great coaling wood.
  6. awoodman

    awoodman Member

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    Build a solar wood dryer along a south-facing wall and cover in plastic but let air circulate from end to end. works realy fast..........
  7. JerseyWreckDiver

    JerseyWreckDiver New Member

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    Thats an idea. It'll cost money of course but there are lots of plans online to build a solar kiln.
  8. gzecc

    gzecc Minister of Fire

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    I won’t disagree completely about the oak but I am right now burning the Sugar Maple I split in late spring, came down green and sat for a bit before I got to it. I did take the extra step of taking the bark off it to speed things up a bit but it is dry as a bone.

    I think if you were able to take the bark off immediately that tree was not that fresh to begin with.
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