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Log Lifting

Post in 'The Gear' started by DTrain, Feb 15, 2013.

  1. DTrain

    DTrain Burning Hunk

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    Looking for some advice about chain hoists, block and tackles. I need to purchase one. I have my new pile of logs in the back of the property that I need to start processing. I use a 4' one man saw, and a 6' two man saw to buck the logs. I want to be able to roll the logs to a poll with a block and tackle to lift the log so I can lower it onto my saw buck. Any one have any thing to offer on the subject?

    Thanks. 2013-02-01_15-17-28_436.jpg

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  2. nate379

    nate379 Guest

    Use a chainsaw and cut from the pile?
    Nixon, TreePointer and Wildo like this.
  3. Joful

    Joful Minister of Fire

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    I'd buy a cant hook (Logrite ~ $100) and a decent 65cc (Stihl 036'ish ~ $300) chainsaw, and have that job done in an afternoon.
  4. DTrain

    DTrain Burning Hunk

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    Have a cant hook. Not looking for alternatives, that's how I want to do it.
  5. Ehouse

    Ehouse Minister of Fire

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    Amazon has a decent block and tackle for a four part line for $14.60. you supply the line.
  6. Ehouse

    Ehouse Minister of Fire

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    A chain fall is great for heavier loads lifting vertically, but they tend to bind up pulling diagonally. They are also slow. I'd say either a 4 part B@T that you can unreeve down to 2 part for speed with lighter pulls, or one 4 part and one 2 part. They're cheap enough. If you really want to get basic, you can rig one from a couple of steel rings or carabiners. I wear a belt with a double brass ring buckle (you've seen 'em) for emergency use or when I forget a come along and need to pull a lawn tractor on a trailer. It's a bit of old time sailboat rigging.
  7. DTrain

    DTrain Burning Hunk

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    Thanks for that info. Hadn't considered being able to have different config for different uses. I will roll the logs to my post and lift one end straight up then set the buck under the log. So I should be able to lift fairly vertically. Any specs I should consider when buying the blocks and rope?
  8. bogydave

    bogydave Minister of Fire

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    You'll figure out what works best for you.
    500 lb area should work for what I see.
    Levers, pulleys & ropes & you can move lots of weight!

    Your way the wood warms you up several times in several ways.
    Sounds like you have the time to put toward processing the wood.

    Move the saw buck close to the pile of logs ;)
    Have fun.
  9. Ehouse

    Ehouse Minister of Fire

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    Just make sure the rope is sized for the block, probably 5/8" or 3/4" and is good work rope rated for the pick, probably nylon, but protect it from the sun. UV will weaken and destroy the fibers. Manilla will rot if stored wet. Look for a B@T with a pinch slot or fall stop on the top block to hold the load in the air, but never get under the load to arrange your gear and don't leave it unattended. A chain fall/hoist for the vertical lift has the advantage of holding the load in position until you reverse the fall line to lower it. You can get one for about 50 bucks.
  10. Como

    Como Minister of Fire

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    [​IMG]


    Something like this with off road wheels?
  11. Joful

    Joful Minister of Fire

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    My sailing club has one of those with pneumatic off-road wheels, for lifting sailboats off their trailers to install or remove bottom covers. It does not roll well on gravel.
  12. Valhalla

    Valhalla Minister of Fire

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    Saw buck... why not just cut it up and toss it in a pickup or small tractor w/trailer. Haul it to your shed for splitting or stacking area closer to your house.
  13. MasterMech

    MasterMech Guest

    'cause he's doing it with human-powered saws, not a chainsaw. I'm sure the sawbuck makes that much easier.
  14. pen

    pen There are some who call me...mod. Staff Member

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    Make sure responses are aimed at helping DTrain with what HE is trying to accomplish.
  15. Ehouse

    Ehouse Minister of Fire

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    Another advantage of the chain fall is no lower block so it's easy to give the log a slight lift grab the chain and position the log for the next cut.
  16. Joful

    Joful Minister of Fire

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    I have three chain falls, and two block and tackles, and all have upper and lower blocks. How would a block and tackle work without a lower block?
  17. Dune

    Dune Minister of Fire

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    A block and tackle wouldn't, but lots of chain falls have no lower block.
  18. Ehouse

    Ehouse Minister of Fire

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    I think there's some confusion in the naming of these. The he old chain falls used to get hay up were really block and tackles using chain instead of rope with a sprocketed wheel (I used to have one myself). I'm seeing the single block version (which is a really, really handy device) referred to as a chain fall/hoist. Google will get you several pics. I can't explain how they can get such great mechanical advantage with one small block as most of them are closed construction. The fall (the part you pull) is looped back up to the block and you can raise or lower with equal ease. there's a slack loop of chain that droops down and varies in length as you raise or lower, and a single lead with a hook. It will hold the load where it is if you let go of the fall. You'll see powered versions on trollys in many shops for moving heavy stuff. One slick invention I'd say.
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  19. Joful

    Joful Minister of Fire

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    The single head type are geared inside, but when I say chain fall, I'm always thinking the traditional type. You are correct, in that it's really a block and tackle with chain in place of rope, but that's what "chain fall" meant for a hundred years before the geared type!
  20. Ehouse

    Ehouse Minister of Fire

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    Out of curiosity, I googled chain fall, chain hoist, and chain block and tackle. Almost all the photos for each of these entries were of the single block, single lead "modern" type, with only one or two of the older style. Probably "chain hoist" or "chain fall/hoist" is best to avoid confusion.
  21. Ehouse

    Ehouse Minister of Fire

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    DTrain, maybe this is more info than you want, but if you always had your logs in the same place to process, you could set up a swinging trolly arm or just a swinging stiff arm (pipe over a post) and use a chain fall/hoist to move them over and then lift them onto the buck.
  22. NH_Wood

    NH_Wood Minister of Fire

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    Could you get a heavy pulley and strong rope above the pile (on thick limb near trunk), and use a vehicle (truck) to pull the rope hoist the logs. Just brainstorming. Cheers!
  23. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    zaz.png


    Mount this to a splitter....
  24. MasterMech

    MasterMech Guest

    His splitter is kinda short on mounting options. ;)

    [​IMG]
  25. lukem

    lukem Minister of Fire

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    An 8' section of 20" red oak will weight 1,100 lbs.

    Assuming you can get it in position to your lift and only need to go vertical, I'd consider building an A-Frame with a chain hoist mounted overhead. Roll/pull sawbuck out of the way...drag/roll log into position...lift the log...put the sawbuck back in place...and lower it down.

    You could build the A-Frame out of some treated 6x6 and get a $50 2-ton chain hoist from Harbor Freight.

    If you are talking about getting them off the pile and into position that's a different animal.

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