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longwood stove pipe drips water

Post in 'Classic Wood Stove Forums (prior to approx. 1993)' started by jeremy turner, Nov 28, 2012.

  1. jeremy turner

    jeremy turner New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2012
    Messages:
    2
    can anyone help me figure out why the stove pipe on my longwood drips water out of it? it only happens when I have the ash pit door completley closed. the furnace is for the pole barn. was used in the house but upgraded to a hot blast. it never did this when it was in the house.

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  2. Corey

    Corey Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2005
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    2,152
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    Midwest
    Sounds like the seams on the pipe may be put together backward? The 'big' pipe should be on the bottom with the smaller pipe fitting in from the top. This way, any water running down the pipe is funneled inside the lower section and ultimately vaporized as it gets back closer to the stove. If the small section is on bottom with the big one fitting over on the top, when the water runs down the inside of the pipe, it leaks out the seam.

    Though, it might not be bad to look a little closer and ask why is water condensing in the pipe in the first place? Is the wood too wet? Is the flue uninsulated and allowing the flue gases to cool and condense? It sounds like you may be burning pretty low when the door is closed, so not a lot of heat going up the flue - this will also add to the problem.
  3. jeremy turner

    jeremy turner New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2012
    Messages:
    2
    I never thought it mattered how the pipes were assembled until this happenned. now I know and I think you are right about the reasoning behind it condensing also. yes, its pretty green wood I have been burning in it. no, the flue isn't insulated. and when I close the ashpit door it almost puts the fire out but keeps it "suspended" unitil I am ready for more heat. I have only been heating with wood for about 6 years now and every year is full of new lessons. thanks for your help!
  4. pen

    pen There are some who call me...mod. Staff Member

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    If by ash pit, you mean ash pan door (i was thinking you were talking about the chimney cleanout when I read your post originally) then you seriously need to find yourself some better seasoned wood!

    Even with poorly seasoned wood, leaving that bottom ash pan door open, and allowing air to come up from underneath, can damage those grates!

    As a temp get-you-through solution, you may find better success (after aiming the male ends of your single wall pipe towards the stove) by mixing in some man-made fuel, such as eco-bricks, bio-bricks, etc.

    My local Tractor Supply sells a different brand of these http://www.tractorsupply.com/redstone-trade-ecobrick-pack-of-6-1001261

    [​IMG]

    While doing that, get next year's wood on hand now, have it split, stacked, and seasoning so you don't wind up fighting poor fuel again. It's frustrating, most all of us have been there.

    Good luck!

    pen

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